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Willy Franzen: How The Internet Has Changed The Job Hunt

What are some of the biggest mistakes that job seekers make?
People lead with the job and I think that’s totally wrong. You go to the job board and you find a job. It’s medieval. If you don’t understand what the company is and what they do, the job doesn’t have meaning. It’s just a piece of a puzzle. You have this little piece but you don’t understand the context on how it fits in.

Instead of looking at a job posting and applying for it, take apart the details inside. Look at the company. Look at the name of the person who posted it. Is it a hiring manager or recruiter? Look at the news. What’s happening with the company? What about the industry? There’s so many plot and sub-plots here that you need to understand to be successful in that job.


According to Willy Franzen, many of us make the mistake of job hunting when we should be “company hunting.” As the founder of OneDayOneJob.com, the 27-year-old Franzen is on a mission to help recent grads find awesome entry-level jobs. To achieve this, he’s been profiling cool, relevant companies – one a day – for the past 4.5 years. That means ODOJ.com now houses 1,500+ company profiles, each accompanied by companion job openings and internship listings.I recently interviewed Franzen about how anyone in the job market can improve their job-seeking tactics as well as about his own experiences bootstrapping a web business.

What are some of the biggest mistakes that job seekers make?
People lead with the job and I think that’s totally wrong. You go to the job board and you find a job. It’s medieval. If you don’t understand what the company is and what they do, the job doesn’t have meaning. It’s just a piece of a puzzle. You have this little piece but you don’t understand the context on how it fits in.

Instead of looking at a job posting and applying for it, take apart the details inside. Look at the company. Look at the name of the person who posted it. Is it a hiring manager or recruiter? Look at the news. What’s happening with the company? What about the industry? There’s so many plot and sub-plots here that you need to understand to be successful in that job.

How have the Internet and social media changed the job search? 
The truth is that the technology doesn’t really change anything in terms of what you need to do. It changes the tactics but it doesn’t really change the strategy. You still need to make the same impression. You still need to show the person that you can do the job and that you’re going to make them look good.

But technology changes things in a few ways. First and foremost, you can learn so much more about the company and the job than you ever could have before. That can’t be understated. To find the information I put on One Day, One Job, I’d have to spend weeks researching each company because I’d have to dig through old newspaper articles, old magazine articles – it would be impossible. Now all that information is at your fingertips.

People lead with the job and I think that’s totally wrong. You go to the job board and you find a job. It’s medieval… Leer más “Willy Franzen: How The Internet Has Changed The Job Hunt”

The Market that Needs a Market Maker

Do you wonder why there were an average of 8 million jobs posted online in the U.S. every month of last year, while 13 million people continued to search for work during the exact same months? The reason is that the U.S. — along with just about every other country — is suffering from a talent mismatch: employers cannot find individuals with the skills and capabilities they need, where and when they need them. The problem is not just one of location and timing, however. There is no mechanism that reliably signals which skills employers need so that individuals and schools can develop those skills. In other words, the relationship between supply and demand is tenuous at best. The job market simply doesn’t function the way a market should.

Experts have examined the problem from every angle and concluded that, if left unresolved, the skills mismatch will continue to eat away at U.S. competiveness. Research by the McKinsey Global Institute predictsthat by 2020, the U.S. will need to create 21 million new jobs to return to full employment but, should present trends continue, there will be 1.5 million too few college graduates to meet demand and that 5.9 million people will not have the education employers require and will therefore be unemployable. That’s why at ManpowerGroup we believe that investment ought to focus on youth, who are now entering the market and who most need training. Building their skills will help unleash their potential and start to close the widening gap. Still, while I cannot overstate the importance of training, it alone will not solve the labor market’s structural dysfunction.


Tammy Johns

http://blogs.hbr.org
TAMMY JOHNS
Tammy Johns is a senior vice president at ManpowerGroup, in charge of the company’s innovation and workforce solutions.

Do you wonder why there were an average of 8 million jobs posted online in the U.S. every month of last year, while 13 million people continued to search for work during the exact same months? The reason is that the U.S. — along with just about every other country — is suffering from a talent mismatch: employers cannot find individuals with the skills and capabilities they need, where and when they need them. The problem is not just one of location and timing, however. There is no mechanism that reliably signals which skills employers need so that individuals and schools can develop those skills. In other words, the relationship between supply and demand is tenuous at best. The job market simply doesn’t function the way a market should.

Experts have examined the problem from every angle and concluded that, if left unresolved, the skills mismatch will continue to eat away at U.S. competiveness. Research by the McKinsey Global Institute predictsthat by 2020, the U.S. will need to create 21 million new jobs to return to full employment but, should present trends continue, there will be 1.5 million too few college graduates to meet demand and that 5.9 million people will not have the education employers require and will therefore be unemployable. That’s why at ManpowerGroup we believe that investment ought to focus on youth, who are now entering the market and who most need training. Building their skills will help unleash their potential and start to close the widening gap. Still, while I cannot overstate the importance of training, it alone will not solve the labor market’s structural dysfunction.

How can the U.S. labor market become more efficient? Leer más “The Market that Needs a Market Maker”

More Wives Head for Work

The effect of this gender shift in the job market isn’t simply economic. Ellen Galinsky, president of the Families and Work Institute, has produced studies that show men now struggle to balance family and career more than women do—45 percent of men report such problems, vs. 39 percent of women. “Work isn’t working very well for men,” says Galinsky.

Angela Patterson, 44, knows the struggles all too well. When the single mother of two adult daughters met her husband three years ago, she was hoping to find economic security. Instead, he lost his job as a contractor, and Patterson ended up moving from North Carolina to New York to enroll at the Grace Institute, a nonprofit that prepares women for the workforce. The training helped her become an agent for New York Life. She’s living with her daughter in New York since her husband doesn’t want to come North. “Women are born and bred to be adaptable,” she says. “When you have kids and bills to pay, you make sacrifices.”

Few experts expect the women who were pushed by recession into the labor market to leave as the economy picks up. Eroded housing values, diminished retirement accounts, and the prospect of higher taxes and anemic wage growth for themselves and their husbands provide these reluctant workers powerful incentives to stay at their jobs.

Diana Gomez, for one, isn’t giving up her job in the dentist’s office, even though her husband was recalled to his job in a sheet metal factory four months ago. The double income they have now is enough to restore a minimal sense of security. “We can function as a whole family now,” says Gomez, who has two children. “We’re able to pay the bills. The pressure’s not all on me.”


By Diane Brady | http://www.businessweek.com

As men cope with unemployment, more wives head to work

Angela Patterson is working as an insurance agent in New York while her husband looks for construction jobs in North Carolina. Diana Gomez had been staying home to care for an ill daughter. When her husband lost his job, she became an administrative assistant in a dentist’s office. Michelle, a social worker and mother of three young children in Baltimore, who asked that her last name not be used, switched from part-time to full-time work when her husband was laid off last year. She kept to that schedule after he found work earlier this year—at two-thirds his former salary.

They are the reluctant breadwinners: Women who wanted to stay home until their income suddenly became critical to the well-being of their families. In some cases they are increasing their hours to keep the bills paid. Others are taking up employment for the first time as their husbands struggle to find work. With the anemic recovery keeping the job outlook uncertain, the accelerated gender shift is likely to stick, creating new challenges for U.S. families. Leer más “More Wives Head for Work”

Little Hiring Seen for Rest of Year

You’ve heard that old saw that if something quacks like a duck, walks like a duck, it’s probably a duck? Might as well apply it to the U.S. economy.

Today’s Economic Trends Index from The Conference Board declined slightly from July. It now stands at 96.7. In July it was 97.4.

Obviously, that’s not good news, though a .7 drop in an index that is up 9.4 percent in a year might be ignorable if all it did was quack. But the Index is also walking like the duck it is. For the first time since March 2009 seven of the eight components that go into the index turned negative.

The Conference Board reported the weakening indicators were: Percentage of Respondents Who Say They Find “Jobs Hard to Get”; Initial Claims for Unemployment Insurance, Percentage of Firms With Positions Not Able to Fill Right Now; Part-Time Workers for Economic Reasons; Job Openings; Industrial Production; and Real Manufacturing and Trade Sales.


You’ve heard that old saw that if something quacks like a duck, walks like a duck, it’s probably a duck? Might as well apply it to the U.S. economy.

Today’s Economic Trends Index from The Conference Board declined slightly from July. It now stands at 96.7. In July it was 97.4.

Obviously, that’s not good news, though a .7 drop in an index that is up 9.4 percent in a year might be ignorable if all it did was quack. But the Index is also walking like the duck it is. For the first time since March 2009 seven of the eight components that go into the index turned negative.

The Conference Board reported the weakening indicators were: Percentage of Respondents Who Say They Find “Jobs Hard to Get”; Initial Claims for Unemployment Insurance, Percentage of Firms With Positions Not Able to Fill Right Now; Part-Time Workers for Economic Reasons; Job Openings; Industrial Production; and Real Manufacturing and Trade Sales. Leer más “Little Hiring Seen for Rest of Year”

Planning For Retirement at Any Age

The market crashed — then recovered. Feeling safer? To battle the uncertainty, check out our five-part series on how to plan for retirement now.

It’s All About Good Habits and Long Term Plans

If you’re in your 20s, the path to retirement is as clear as ever. Sure, there are some bumps to maneuver: the job market is tough right now, and your near-term career advancement and earnings power may have been curbed by the recession and a whole bunch of under-saved 60-somethings staying at work longer to make ends meet. But these are short-term issues that will disappear in time. Meanwhile, your young age gives you plenty of time to prepare.


The market crashed — then recovered. Feeling safer? To battle the uncertainty, check out our five-part series on how to plan for retirement now.

It’s All About Good Habits and Long Term Plans

If you’re in your 20s, the path to retirement is as clear as ever. Sure, there are some bumps to maneuver: the job market is tough right now, and your near-term career advancement and earnings power may have been curbed by the recession and a whole bunch of under-saved 60-somethings staying at work longer to make ends meet. But these are short-term issues that will disappear in time. Meanwhile, your young age gives you plenty of time to prepare. Leer más “Planning For Retirement at Any Age”

How to negotiate a better salary – even now

TARA WEISS, FORBES.COM

David Hoffman, the chief executive officer of the executive search firm DHR, in Chicago, recalls a client who was recently offered $100,000 less than he felt he deserved for a job. Instead of jumping at the offer because of the tough job market, the candidate, together with Hoffman, negotiated and managed to meet the company in the middle. They described the candidate’s unique fit for the job and the difficulty he’d have with his relocation to a more expensive city. They got the employer to boost the offer by $50,000.

Negotiating a pay rise in a tough job market can usually be done, as long as they want you in the first place.


TARA WEISS, FORBES.COM

David Hoffman, the chief executive officer of the executive search firm DHR, in Chicago, recalls a client who was recently offered $100,000 less than he felt he deserved for a job. Instead of jumping at the offer because of the tough job market, the candidate, together with Hoffman, negotiated and managed to meet the company in the middle. They described the candidate’s unique fit for the job and the difficulty he’d have with his relocation to a more expensive city. They got the employer to boost the offer by $50,000.

Negotiating a pay rise in a tough job market can usually be done, as long as they want you in the first place. Leer más “How to negotiate a better salary – even now”