“I’m Feeling Lucky” button launched last year | Improving video awesomeness with one click

This breakthrough in video awesomeness is possible thanks to our research team who expanded on the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button launched last year, automatically detecting if stabilization or color correction would be helpful for you. The result is a one-click option rolling out over the next few days that cures these two symptoms now, and more planned in the future.

So you keep capturing those awesome moments, and we’ll keep on ways to help you make those videos even more awesome.

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http://youtube-global.blogspot.com.ar/

Whether you’re perfecting your double backflip at the park, capturing a flash mob on your phone, or enjoying singing in a subway, it’s not easy to get your video quality perfect. Sometimes videos suffer from symptoms like “shaky-camera-itis” or “augmented-darkness-levels” that keep viewers from seeing just how awesome your video really is. We made a big step last year with the YouTube Video Editor, and now we’re adding a feature that does the work of curing these symptoms for you.

If you uploada video that’s shaky or dark, we’ll automatically offer to fix it for you, creating an updated version of your video on YouTube.When you upload a video that could use a fixup, you’ll see a notification bar on the Upload page and in your Video Manager. Click the button to fix it, and you’ll see a side by side preview to decide if you want to accept the edits.

Select “Okay” if you’d like us to update your video to the preview version (you can always undo this later). Even if you’re uploading a video from your mobile device, the Video Manager on the desktop will give you a notice if this video can be cured as well. Here’s an overview: Leer más ““I’m Feeling Lucky” button launched last year | Improving video awesomeness with one click”

JPEG 101: A Crash Course Guide on JPEG

Semantics and Disambiguation: JPEG vs. JFIF/Exif

Many people refer to any image format that uses the JPEG compression algorithm as a “JPEG file.” However, most image-capturing devices (such as a digital camera) and image-editing programs actually create a file in the JFIF or Exif format. For all intents and purposes, when people say “JPEG file” or when a software application says they’re saving your work in JPEG, you can just think of it as a file that uses the JPEG algorithm, whether it’s really JFIF or Exif.
Why Use JPEG?

JPEG allows you to control the degree of “lossiness” by adjusting compression parameters. This way, you can achieve very small files with just the minimum amount of quality that you really need.

The second important advantage of JPEG is that it stores full color information: 24 bits per pixel (that means 16 million colors). GIF, another image format widely used on the web, can only store 8 bits per pixel (256 colors). This capacity for storing colors is why JPEG compression is great for displaying images that have rich colors and that are photographic in quality.
JPEG Compression

Opposite to the PNG format (which uses a lossless compression algorithm), JPEG uses a lossy compression method.

Lossy compression reduces the image size by discarding information. Think of lossy compression as an excellent book summary of just the important and interesting parts of a book you’re reading. For example, you could summarize a book that’s long-winded and redundant in prose, to just a page worth of notes containing only the information that’s really important.

The problem, then, is when you want to recreate the original book from your one-page book summary; it wouldn’t be possible.

The other problem is that if you continue to summarize the book summary again, then you’ll lose more fidelity and accuracy from the original book.

With lossy compression, compressing an image again means losing more data, which means reduced image quality.


by Catalin Rosu
http://sixrevisions.com/graphics-design/jpeg-101-a-crash-course-guide-on-jpeg/

 

JPEG 101: A Crash Course Guide on JPEG

JPEG, a compression algorithm optimized for photographic images, is something we encounter on a regular basis. JPEG is not limited to a certain amount of color (unlike GIF, for example) and is popular due to its variable compression range, meaning that you’re able to more easily control the amount of compression, and consequently, the resultant image quality. In this guide, we will discuss the important things you need to know about JPEG.

 

Quick Overview of JPEG

Here is a list of things you should know about JPEG:

  • JPEG is a lossy compression algorithm; this means that it discards some data from an image to reduce its file size
  • JPEG is often pronounced as “jay peg”
  • JPEG is an acronym for Joint Photographic Experts Group, the organization that developed the JPEG format
  • .jpg and .jpeg are the most common file extensions of images compressed using JPEG compression algorithm; they are the same, but old DOS systems have a 3-character limit on file extensions — modern operating systems recognize both .jpg and .jpeg
  • Other file formats that use the JPEG compression algorithm are .jpe, .jfif and .jif Leer más “JPEG 101: A Crash Course Guide on JPEG”

The design process vs. design-as-product

The trouble with the word “template” is that its meaning depends on one’s point of view.

To some, a template is a ticket to an instant website. Many content management systems allow owners to change plug-and-play themes as easily as they change clothes, and inexpensive skins are just a Google search away.

To others, templates are learning tools. Studying samples of real-world code and style is more practical for them than following examples in a book or reviewing lecture notes.

Templates can represent independence. Anyone, even someone without basic design or development skills, can choose from hundreds of templates without fear that a “design expert” will question their decision.

Templates can also mean efficiency. They are generic enough to fit most information, and they are reusable. Fill the space with a dash of content and you’re done.

Many people I’ve worked with-designers, managers and clients alike-equate templates with design. To create a design is to build a chair in which the content will sit. To choose a design is to select a vehicle to carry information.

The noun “design” differs from the verb “design”: one is a product, the other a process. This thought begs the question: is web design skin deep, or are designers more than purveyors of templates?

intentional design stands out [Más…]
Chasing Keyboard Shortcuts

Thinking of the process of designing a website as “producing the best template” is the wrong approach. I know from experience.

Not long ago I was hired to design a law firm’s website. The business’ owners knew what they wanted, more or less, and provided JPG mock-ups. Aware of the tight deadline, the developer and I hammered out a database, a custom CMS and, of course, the HTML template.

Their three-column composition had pale boxes on a paler background. We measured space for ads on the right, worked to fit the search tool on the left, checked spacing in three versions of Explorer and tweaked the drop-shadows under the navigation bar. In short, we fretted over everything except the center column.

As deadline approached, we met to address last-minute problems. One person wasn’t satisfied with the arrangement of certain information. Someone suggested a solution and asked me to try it out. A few HTML changes later, we saw the new page. Everyone settled for this compromise, and the website went ahead.

After the launch, the client complimented my design skills and particularly my knowledge of keyboard shortcuts. At first, I didn’t recognize the unintended insult, but I’d been cast in the role of “button pusher,” and the field of design was button pushing. Worse, it was my fault: by acting on the committee’s whim, I put myself in this position. The job paid well, but the result was uninspired and the experience belittling.

The best way to design, and I mean the verb, is to keep on designing, to seek problems. To insist that “less is more” is the same as saying “Don’t do something unless the project suffers without it.”

template design vs. content design

How Does It Work?
1. Ask questions.

“What do we want to accomplish?” is just the beginning, and “To build a website” is not a sufficient answer.

* “Who are we trying to help, inform or influence?”
* “Why should people come to us instead of the competition?”
* “Who is responsible for what?”
* “What do we need in order to launch, and what can wait for later?”
* “How will we maintain this website? Who will make changes, monitor traffic and troubleshoot problems?”
* “Has this been done before? If so, how can we improve on it? What mistakes can we learn from?”


design-process-mass-producedhttp://www.webdesignerdepot.com

The trouble with the wordtemplate is that its meaning depends on one’s point of view.

To some, a template is a ticket to an instant website. Many content management systems allow owners to change plug-and-play themes as easily as they change clothes, and inexpensive skins are just a Google search away.

To others, templates are learning tools. Studying samples of real-world code and style is more practical for them than following examples in a book or reviewing lecture notes.

Templates can represent independence. Anyone, even someone without basic design or development skills, can choose from hundreds of templates without fear that a “design expert” will question their decision.

Templates can also mean efficiency. They are generic enough to fit most information, and they are reusable. Fill the space with a dash of content and you’re done.

Many people I’ve worked with-designers, managers and clients alike-equate templates with design. To create a design is to build a chair in which the content will sit. To choose a design is to select a vehicle to carry information.

The noun “design” differs from the verb “design”: one is a product, the other a process. This thought begs the question: is web design skin deep, or are designers more than purveyors of templates?

intentional design stands out Leer más “The design process vs. design-as-product”

jQuery webcam plugin

The jQuery webcam plugin is a transparent layer to communicate with a camera directly in JavaScript.
Overview

This plugin provides three different modes to access a webcam through a small API directly with JavaScript – or more precisely jQuery. Thus, it is possible to bring the image on a Canvas (callback mode), to store the image on the server (save mode) and to stream the live image of the Flash element on a Canvas (stream mode). If you just want to download the plugin, click here:


http://www.xarg.org/project/jquery-webcam-plugin/
© 2008-2010 Robert Eisele | http://www.xarg.org/

The jQuery webcam plugin is a transparent layer to communicate with a camera directly in JavaScript.

Overview

This plugin provides three different modes to access a webcam through a small API directly with JavaScript – or more precisely jQuery. Thus, it is possible to bring the image on a Canvas (callback mode), to store the image on the server (save mode) and to stream the live image of the Flash element on a Canvas (stream mode). If you just want to download the plugin, click here:

Download the jQuery webcam plugin

jQuery webcam example

Take a picture after 3 seconds | Take a picture instantly

Available Cameras

  • Laptop Integrated Webcam
  • Google Camera Adapter 0
  • Google Camera Adapter 1

If you activate the filter with the button on the right side of the picture, methods of my already published jQuery plugin xcolor will be used to distort the colors of the Canvas.

General information about the interface

The following snippet describes the interface of the webcam API:

$("#camera").webcam({
        width: 320,
        height: 240,
        mode: "callback",
        swffile: "/download/jscam_canvas_only.swf",
        onTick: function() {},
        onSave: function() {},
        onCapture: function() {},
        debug: function() {},
        onLoad: function() {}
});

Config Parameter

width
The width of the flash movie.

height
The height of the flash movie. Both parameters have to be changed in the Flash file as well. Follow the instructions below to recompile the swf after the size change.

mode
The storage mode can be one of the following: callback, save, stream. Details about the usage of each parameter can be found under the according heading below.

swffile
Points to the swf file of the Flash movie, which provides the webcam API. There are two swf files provided via the download archive: jscam.swf, which provides the full API and jscam_canvas_only.swf which have no embedded JPEG library (I embedded an adjusted JPGEncoder of the AS 3 corelib). Thereby, the file is only one third as large as the original.

onTick, onSave, onCapture
These callbacks are described in detail below, since they change with each mode.

onLoad
The onLoad callback is called as soon as the registration of the interface is done. In the example above, I use the callback to get a list of all cameras available:

onLoad: function() {

    var cams = webcam.getCameraList();
    for(var i in cams) {
        jQuery("#cams").append("<li>" + cams[i] + "</li>");
    }
}

Once the onLoad callback is called, a global object window.webcam is available, which provides the following methods:

  • capture([delay])
    Captures an image internally.
  • save([file])
    Saves the captured image accordingly to the storage mode.
  • getCameraList()
    Get’s an array of available cameras. If no camera is installed, an error is thrown and an empty array is returned.
  • setCamera([index])
    Switches to a different camera. The parameter is the index of the element in the resulting array of getCameraList()

debug
The debug callback is called whenever there is a note or an error you should be notified. In the example above, I just replace the html content of the output container:

debug: function (type, string) {
        $("#status").html(type + ": " + string);
}

Callback Interface Leer más “jQuery webcam plugin”