Innovation posts of the week: Organizational Innovation


http://www.game-changer.net/2010/10/03/innovation-posts-of-the-week-organizational-innovation/

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Insights first, ideas second

A more strategic way of generating ideas is to focus on building ideas on top of insights. Don’t get me wrong, thinking stuff up is fun. You let your imagination run wild, think of the impossible and think all kinds of stuff only you can imagine. It’s your own dream world! Mostly all these ideas will be way ahead of their time or not even doable. That’s why we need to combine our imagination with our intellect. Our intellect drives our capability to discover insights and our imagination helps put the pieces together in a new way.

So how do you discover new insights?


(…)Abstract
By Jorge Barba, an Innovation Insurgent | http://www.game-changer.net

Insights, they’re the seeds of new groundbreaking ideas.

A more strategic way of generating ideas is to focus on building ideas on top of insights. Don’t get me wrong, thinking stuff up is fun. You let your imagination run wild, think of the impossible and think all kinds of stuff only you can imagine. It’s your own dream world! Mostly all these ideas will be way ahead of their time or not even doable. That’s why we need to combine our imagination with our intellect. Our intellect drives our capability to discover insights and our imagination helps put the pieces together in a new way.

So how do you discover new insights? Leer más “Insights first, ideas second”

Innovation. What gives? | By Jorge Barba

Spotted this tweet a few minutes ago: #Innovation is rare. Proof: millions of cookbooks sold and read all with practically the same recipes. What gives?

What gives? Human nature.

Innovation is about people and whatever beliefs, habits and attitudes people have are the limiting factors that prevent them from adopting new viewpoints or ideas. Yes, innovation can be taught but as Jose Briones says: it requires that people have an open mind and that is an incredibly scarce resource.


By Jorge Barba, an Innovation Insurgent
http://www.game-changer.net

innovation what gives

Spotted this  tweet a few minutes ago: #Innovation is rare. Proof: millions of cookbooks sold and read all with practically the same recipes. What gives?

What gives? Human nature.

Innovation is about people and whatever beliefs, habits and attitudes people have are the limiting factors that prevent them from adopting new viewpoints or ideas. Yes, but as  Jose Briones says: it requires that people have an open mind and that is an incredibly scarce resource.

My amigo Jonathan Amm from  @ThinkTank_ probably said it best when he described the work we do as psychology work because those of us who are innovation insurgents are really in the business of opening people’s minds, . As far as all the recipes in books go, I wouldn’t be surprised that 10 years from now we’re still be talking about because human nature is one itch most don’t like to scratch. Most don’t and can’t think for themselves and resort to copycatting, which is essential to human evolution but detrimental to an organizations ability to be innovative. Leer más “Innovation. What gives? | By Jorge Barba”

Prepare for the unexpected

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation. It’s a scenario that’s outside your direct experience, you find it hard to accept it as possible and even worse adapting to it.

Now think about it this way:

What if businesses were judged on their ability to create ‘happiness for customers’? What if all those like buttons had less to do with becoming a fan and more to do with specific actions an organization took to actually make a customer happy? What if you hired people based on how happy they’ll make your customers? What if there were a ‘customer happiness index’ dashboard (Tweetdeck) and we’d all have access to it just like the stock market? What if businesses were penalized for wasting people’s time?


A smiley by Pumbaa, drawn using a text editor.

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation. It’s a scenario that’s outside your direct experience, you find it hard to accept it as possible and even worse adapting to it.

Now think about it this way:

What if businesses were judged on their ability to create ‘happiness for customers’? What if all those like buttons had less to do with becoming a fan and more to do with specific actions an organization took to actually make a customer happy? What if you hired people based on how happy they’ll make your customers? What  if there were a ‘customer happiness index’ dashboard (Tweetdeck) and we’d all have access to it just like the stock market? What if businesses were penalized for wasting people’s time?

Imagine how every business would behave. Leer más “Prepare for the unexpected”

Remove the associative barriers that hinder new ideas

For example if I say ‘car’ someone might say ‘tire’ because our minds make that connection automatically because we know it exists. But how about if I say ‘granola’ and someone else says ‘water’, which makes no sense to some of us but if you put the two together that person might see ‘river’.

So in other words when someone sees something different out of the unknown it’s because that person has very low associative barriers.

One of the reasons why most of us can’t make insightful new connections between dissimilar things is because we have ‘high associative barriers’. A person with high associative barriers will quickly arrive at conclusions when confronted with a problem since their thinking is more focused. He or she will recall how the problem has been handled in the past or how others in similar situations solved it. A person with low associative barriers, on the other hand, may think to connect ideas or concepts that have very little basis in past experience, or that cannot easily be traced logically.

The question then is how do we remove these barriers?


Image via Wikipedia

Model of hydogen bonds in water in English.

Last week I mentioned that the is the ability to free associate, to make connections between dissimilar things. I just stumbled into  Ellen Di Resta’s post on the where she probes further into the concept to which I left a comment:

(…)
I think it comes down to people’s ‘associative barriers’, or the ability to make new connection between dissimilar things.

For example if I say ‘car’ someone might say ‘tire’ because our minds make that connection automatically because we know it exists. But how about if I say ‘granola’ and someone else says ‘water’, which makes no sense to some of us but if you put the two together that person might see ‘river’.

So in other words when someone sees something different out of the unknown it’s because that person has very low associative barriers.

One of the reasons why most of us can’t make insightful new connections between dissimilar things is because we have ‘high associative barriers’. A person with high associative barriers will quickly arrive at conclusions when confronted with a problem since their thinking is more focused. He or she will recall how the problem has been handled in the past or how others in similar situations solved it. A person with low associative barriers, on the other hand, may think to connect ideas or concepts that have very little basis in past experience, or that cannot easily be traced logically.

The question then is how do we remove these barriers? Leer más “Remove the associative barriers that hinder new ideas”

From noticing to insight

There are a lot of ways to have insights, from quieting your mind to cultivating happiness all around you. Yet it doesn’t stop there, these are conditions that contribute to having insights. But what about active insight recognition?

That’s where observation comes in. Engaging one’s attention, not just seeing, contributes to the ability to make distinctions and then wondering why those distinctions exist.

For example have you noticed that some people, especially women, sit very close to the wheel of the car as if almost driving with their teeth? This can be attributed to many things such as their height, but that’s not entirely true. Elderly people come to mind when thinking about this but they have some physical limitations such as strength, shortsightedness and height. So why do some people drive almost with their teeth?


There are a lot of ways to have insights, from quieting your mind to cultivating happiness all around you. Yet it doesn’t stop there, these are conditions that contribute to having insights. But what about active insight recognition?

That’s where observation comes in. Engaging one’s attention, not just seeing, contributes to the ability to make distinctions and then wondering why those distinctions exist.

For example have you noticed that some people, especially women, sit very close to the wheel of the car as if almost driving with their teeth? This can be attributed to many things such as their height, but that’s not entirely true. Elderly people come to mind when thinking about this but they have  some physical limitations such as strength, shortsightedness and height. So why do some people drive almost with their teeth? Leer más “From noticing to insight”

Innovating your business model

Competition in industries is essentially competition between business models. A recent tweet by @TimKastelle which led to a post about the evolution of the business model concept reminded me of a great creative exercise to help you look at your and other industries dominant business model as a lego kit, which when broken apart can be reconnected like building blocks to create new types of business concepts.


Competition in industries is essentially competition between business models. A recent  tweet by @TimKastelle which led to a post about the reminded me of a great creative exercise to help you look at your and other industries dominant business model as a lego kit, which when broken apart can be reconnected like building blocks to create new types of business concepts. Leer más “Innovating your business model”

Are you looking for some great readings? You just found it!

Por jabaldaia

Who is an Ethnographer? by Idris Mootee

Ethnography is hot. Many are quick to claim that they do ethnography by observing people. It is like saying anyone who drives a taxi in NY is a screenwriter. Or anyone who knows how to operate a camera can be a photojournalist

Apple iPad and Google Buzz: Harsh Reality of Innovation by Hutch Carpenter

Nothing like putting your heart and soul in an innovation, and then getting this:

Innovation tip – look for remote as well as local opportunities by Paul Sloane

Most businesses look for new opportunities in obvious places, adjacent to their current position. They typically ask two questions:

Innovation Case: Creating A World Class Innovation Unit by Stefan Lindegaard

A global and well-respected company in a fast-growing industry wants to set up a new innovation unit. Their current innovation efforts are technology-driven but there is a growing understanding that innovation efforts need to focus beyond technology and R&D.

The Golden Age of Innovation – Newsweek via Ralph-Ohr

Despite stereotypes of entrepreneurs as fresh-faced youngsters, new research has found that older workers are more likely to innovate than their under-35 counterparts.

Leadership from the Inside Out — Part II by Gary Hamel

In my previous post, I introduced you to Drew Williams. For seven years Drew served as assistant vicar at St. Andrews, an Anglican parish in Chorleywood, England. When he arrived in 2003, Drew found a church that was big but not growing, and a congregation that was loyal but not energized. Mark Stibbe, head vicar at St. Andrews, challenged Drew to develop a plan that would change this.

Watch the disruptors, not the incumbents by by Tom Hulme


10-08-00 Italy
Image by Andrea Vascellari via Flickr

Por jabaldaia

Who is an Ethnographer? by Idris Mootee

Ethnography is hot. Many are quick to claim that they do ethnography by observing people. It is like saying anyone who drives a taxi in NY is a screenwriter. Or anyone who knows how to operate a camera can be a photojournalist

Apple iPad and Google Buzz: Harsh Reality of Innovation by Hutch Carpenter

Nothing like putting your heart and soul in an innovation, and then getting this:

Innovation tip – look for remote as well as local opportunities by Paul Sloane

Most businesses look for new opportunities in obvious places, adjacent to their current position. They typically ask two questions:

Innovation Case: Creating A World Class Innovation Unit by Stefan Lindegaard

A global and well-respected company in a fast-growing industry wants to set up a new innovation unit. Their current innovation efforts are technology-driven but there is a growing understanding that innovation efforts need to focus beyond technology and R&D.

The Golden Age of Innovation – Newsweek via Ralph-Ohr

Despite stereotypes of entrepreneurs as fresh-faced youngsters, new research has found that older workers are more likely to innovate than their under-35 counterparts.

Leadership from the Inside Out — Part II by Gary Hamel

In my previous post, I introduced you to Drew Williams. For seven years Drew served as assistant vicar at St. Andrews, an Anglican parish in Chorleywood, England. When he arrived in 2003, Drew found a church that was big but not growing, and a congregation that was loyal but not energized. Mark Stibbe, head vicar at St. Andrews, challenged Drew to develop a plan that would change this.

Watch the disruptors, not the incumbents by by Tom Hulme Leer más “Are you looking for some great readings? You just found it!”

Some great readings this week! Really!!

por jabaldaia

Enjoy it!

What Is A Social Enterprise? There Is Still A Lot Of Debate? By Idris Mootee

Social enterprise is a hot idea. Being asocial entrepreneurship these days is way cooler than being a iBanker. I think we are only seeing the beginning of a long term trend, people realize it takes a new kind of enterprise to solve the world’s problem. And NGOs are not the solutions.

Innovation Failure & Ownership: What happens when we own our successes and abdicate our failures by Andrew (DrewCM)

Innovation is a high-stakes endeavor. Much may be risked on the hoped-for chance of reward. The success or failure of a single innovation may win or lose reputations and careers. In some organizations, the retribution for failure may be swift and harsh, while the rewards for success may be just as fickle

Is Innovation a Process or an Outcome? By Karen Christensen via Ralph Ohr

You believe that everything we know and desire is the outcome of a single discovery that was made 1.9 million years ago. Please explain.


por jabaldaia

Enjoy it!

What Is A Social Enterprise? There Is Still A Lot Of Debate? By Idris Mootee

Social enterprise is a hot idea. Being asocial entrepreneurship these days is way cooler than being a iBanker. I think we are only seeing the beginning of a long term trend, people realize it takes a new kind of enterprise to solve the world’s problem. And NGOs are not the solutions.

Innovation Failure & Ownership: What happens when we own our successes and abdicate our failures by Andrew (DrewCM)

Innovation is a high-stakes endeavor. Much may be risked on the hoped-for chance of reward. The success or failure of a single innovation may win or lose reputations and careers. In some organizations, the retribution for failure may be swift and harsh, while the rewards for success may be just as fickle

Is Innovation a Process or an Outcome? By Karen Christensen via Ralph Ohr

You believe that everything we know and desire is the outcome of a single discovery that was made 1.9 million years ago. Please explain. Leer más “Some great readings this week! Really!!”

The Chain of Experience: Jobs and Innovation

I enjoy it!

by Stefan Lindegaard

I really like this sentence – the chain of experience – as put forth by Andy Grove in the How to Make an American Job article in BusinessWeek.

Different Forms of Filtering Create Different Forms of Value by Tim Kastelle

Ethan Zuckerman wrote a very interesting post today called What if Search Drove Newspapers? He talks about several different initiatives designed to gauge readers’ interest in different news stories, particularly those that are currently under-reported, and then devising methods for reporting stories on these topics. He asserts (correctly, I think) that this is basically search-driven content development. In particular, this is a strategy that will work well with Google.


Fly or Die
Image by vaXzine via Flickr

Por jabaldaia

I enjoy it!

by Stefan Lindegaard

I really like this sentence – the chain of experience – as put forth by Andy Grove in the How to Make an American Job article in BusinessWeek.

Different Forms of Filtering Create Different Forms of Value by Tim Kastelle

Ethan Zuckerman wrote a very interesting post today called What if Search Drove Newspapers? He talks about several different initiatives designed to gauge readers’ interest in different news stories, particularly those that are currently under-reported, and then devising methods for reporting stories on these topics. He asserts (correctly, I think) that this is basically search-driven content development. In particular, this is a strategy that will work well with Google. Leer más “The Chain of Experience: Jobs and Innovation”