Smartphones replace newspapers as choice of reading material… for men in the toilet

The rise of the ‘boggers’: Many people now admit to using their phones in the toilet to text, email, surf the web… and even take calls

And while TV’s Royle Family head of household Jim, played by Ricky Tomlinson, wouldn’t know a loofah from a loaf of bread, the UK’s men are surprisingly well-groomed and au fait with bathroom accessories.

The new survey, carried out by shampoo brand Head & Shoulders, found that men spend longer in the bathroom than women – 19 minutes compared to 18 minutes on a typical week day.

More than twice as many men as women take two or more showers a day – 19 per cent compared to nine per cent – and men are much more likely than women to regard a loofah and nail scissors as a bathroom essentials…

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By LAURA MANNERING | http://digg.com/newsbar

 

Taking the newspaper to the toilet has long been a proud male preserve.

But now the tech age has affected even this most established of masculine habits.

Instead, Jim Royle types are swapping their tabloids and broadsheets for a smartphone.

New research shows that men are far more likely to be scrolling through their phone screens than browsing the paper.

Now one in two men regularly takes their mobile phone into the toilet to surf the internet, compared to just a third who take a newspaper.

The rise of the 'boggers': Many people now admit to using their phones in the toilet to text, email, surf the web... and even take callsThe rise of the ‘boggers’: Many people now admit to using their phones in the toilet to text, email, surf the web… and even take calls

And while TV’s Royle Family head of household Jim, played by Ricky Tomlinson, wouldn’t know a loofah from a loaf of bread, the UK’s men are surprisingly well-groomed and au fait with bathroom accessories.

The new survey, carried out by shampoo brand Head & Shoulders, found that men spend longer in the bathroom than women – 19 minutes compared to 18 minutes on a typical week day.

More than twice as many men as women take two or more showers a day – 19 per cent compared to nine per cent – and men are much more likely than women to regard a loofah and nail scissors as a bathroom essentials… Leer más “Smartphones replace newspapers as choice of reading material… for men in the toilet”

Larry King, CNN Officially Split

Larry King and CNN are officially parting ways. The network announced on Wednesday that it has decided to end the “Larry King Specials.” King said he will now focus on other projects.

King, who is 78 years old, ended his 25-year role at the network as the host of prime time show “Larry King Live” in December 2010. CNN and King agreed that the famed interviewer would host four specials a year for CNN.

His specials thus far have focused on topics ranging from Alzheimer’s to an exclusive interview with Johnny Depp. His most recent special, “A Larry King Special: Dinner With the Kings,” aired in December. King’s last special made headlines as the broadcaster revealed that he would like to be frozen after his death.

According to the Los Angeles Times, King’s staff of four will likely be let go but may have the opportunity to reapply for new jobs at the network.

King’s show was replaced with “Piers Morgan Tonight,” an interview show hosted by British media personality, Piers Morgan.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com
Larry King

Larry King and CNN are officially parting ways. The network announced on Wednesday that it has decided to end the “Larry King Specials.” King said he will now focus on other projects.

King, who is 78 years old, ended his 25-year role at the network as the host of prime time show “Larry King Live” in December 2010. CNN and King agreed that the famed interviewer would host four specials a year for CNN.

His specials thus far have focused on topics ranging from Alzheimer’s to an exclusive interview with Johnny Depp. His most recent special, “A Larry King Special: Dinner With the Kings,” aired in December. King’s last special made headlines as the broadcaster revealed that he would like to be frozen after his death.

According to the Los Angeles Times, King’s staff of four will likely be let go but may have the opportunity to reapply for new jobs at the network.

King’s show was replaced with “Piers Morgan Tonight,” an interview show hosted by British media personality, Piers Morgan.

7 Tips for an Authentic and Productive Writing Process

Does this sound familiar?

You’re sitting in front of your laptop, staring at a blank screen.

The deadline for the article you need to write is approaching, and you’re struggling to get started when you should be in the final editing stages.

As you sit there trying to put your expertise in writing, a strange insecurity creeps up your spine. You see yourself changing before your own eyes, transforming from a confident expert into a self-conscious amateur.

It’s your own Dr. Jekyll to Mr. Hyde transformation experience.

I’ve been there.
I used to hate writing

Well, actually, it was more like loathing than hating.

Anytime I needed to write anything I’d procrastinate, pretending that avoiding the project would make it go away. Needless to say, the procrastination led to a flurry of rushed writing at the last minute to meet my deadlines, resulting in less than my best work.

But my real problem wasn’t the act of writing. It was fear. Fear of making mistakes, fear that what I wrote would sound stupid, fear that my writing wouldn’t make sense to the reader, etc.
My insecurities were turning me into a monster

So there I was, a guy with more than 15 years of experience, who has won some awards and is even a judge for three international design competitions, worried about sounding stupid.

It sounds ridiculous, but my fear of screwing up made writing a miserable experience for me.

I even used to try to compensate for my fears. I’d use stiff, formal sentences and large, important-sounding words to try to “prove” I knew what I was talking about. Unfortunately, all that did was make me sound like a pretentious jerk.

It was like I was changing from Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde anytime I had to write something.
Then one sentence from my college professor changed everything

I had a job that offered tuition reimbursement benefits, so I decided to take some college classes. One of my classes was a composition class, and the professor gave me the best writing advice I’d ever heard.

“Write the way you talk.”

Wait. What?

It can’t be that easy! Seriously? What a liberating idea! That one piece of advice helped me break free of my fears and relaxed my writing style. No more procrastination. No more using large, unnecessary words to try and impress the reader. I could just relax, be myself, and write.

Now before you get the wrong impression, let me explain something: writing the way you talk does not give you permission to write poorly, or to publish content that sucks.

What it does is help break down the mental barriers of fear and procrastination that keep you from being a more engaging, and more productive writer.

Here’s how to use “write the way you talk” to squash your insecurities and avoid sounding like a pompous idiot…:


Does this sound familiar?

You’re sitting in front of your laptop, staring at a blank screen.

The deadline for the article you need to write is approaching, and you’re struggling to get started when you should be in the final editing stages.

As you sit there trying to put your expertise in writing, a strange insecurity creeps up your spine. You see yourself changing before your own eyes, transforming from a confident expert into a self-conscious amateur.

It’s your own Dr. Jekyll to Mr. Hyde transformation experience.

I’ve been there.

I used to hate writing

Well, actually, it was more like loathing than hating.

Anytime I needed to write anything I’d procrastinate, pretending that avoiding the project would make it go away. Needless to say, the procrastination led to a flurry of rushed writing at the last minute to meet my deadlines, resulting in less than my best work.

But my real problem wasn’t the act of writing. It was fear. Fear of making mistakes, fear that what I wrote would sound stupid, fear that my writing wouldn’t make sense to the reader, etc.

My insecurities were turning me into a monster

So there I was, a guy with more than 15 years of experience, who has won some awards and is even a judge for three international design competitions, worried about sounding stupid.

It sounds ridiculous, but my fear of screwing up made writing a miserable experience for me.

I even used to try to compensate for my fears. I’d use stiff, formal sentences and large, important-sounding words to try to “prove” I knew what I was talking about. Unfortunately, all that did was make me sound like a pretentious jerk.

It was like I was changing from Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde anytime I had to write something.

Then one sentence from my college professor changed everything

I had a job that offered tuition reimbursement benefits, so I decided to take some college classes. One of my classes was a composition class, and the professor gave me the best writing advice I’d ever heard.

“Write the way you talk.”

Wait. What?

It can’t be that easy! Seriously? What a liberating idea! That one piece of advice helped me break free of my fears and relaxed my writing style. No more procrastination. No more using large, unnecessary words to try and impress the reader. I could just relax, be myself, and write.

Now before you get the wrong impression, let me explain something: writing the way you talk does not give you permission to write poorly, or to publish content that sucks.

What it does is help break down the mental barriers of fear and procrastination that keep you from being a more engaging, and more productive writer.

Here’s how to use “write the way you talk” to squash your insecurities and avoid sounding like a pompous idiot…: Leer más “7 Tips for an Authentic and Productive Writing Process”