Design Inspiration: Text Art Showcase

Typography is a major aspect of web and graphic design. With text art, typography and text effects can be used in unique, creative ways to design. In this post we’ll showcase some beautiful examples of text art. If you see something you like, click on the image and you will be led to the source.


http://vandelaydesign.com/blog/galleries/text-art/

Typography is a major aspect of web and graphic design. With text art, typography and text effects can be used in unique, creative ways to design. In this post we’ll showcase some beautiful examples of text art. If you see something you like, click on the image and you will be led to the source.

Australia Post Ad

Australia Post Ad

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix

Cover Girl

Cover Girl

Typographic World Map

Typographic World Map

Freedom

Freedom

Valdez

Valdez

Am I Your Type

Am I Your Type Leer más “Design Inspiration: Text Art Showcase”

Meet the Idiots [WTF!!!]

Making Art With Your Spouse—and Living To Tell the Tale
By Joshua Wolf Shenk

Illustration of Robbi and Matthew. Click image to expand.The creative pairs series so far: “Two Is the Magic Number” critiqued the lone-genius theory and introduced a new science of creative collaboration. “Two of Us” told the drama, in three acts, of the epic and often misunderstood Lennon/McCartney creative duel. Today, we have part one of the adventures of Matthew Swanson and Robbi Behr of “Idiots’Books,” who’ve offered themselves as human guinea pigs (or, shall we say, crash-test dummies?) to sample methods that might shed light on collaboration, relationships, and creativity.

To continue the conversation, please comment below, tweet #creativepairs, or join the Creative Pairs Facebook page.

Is grave conflict inevitable in creative pairs? Will the very flames that heat fiery exchanges always cause third-degree burns, too?

It sure is common. Gilbert and Sullivan came to loathe each other. Pete Townshend once smashed his guitar over Roger Daltrey’s head—and Daltrey hauled off and knocked Townshend unconscious. Even that rock ‘n’ roll tantrum (which makes John Lennon and Paul McCartney look like choirboys) falls far short of the violent extremes: After Oliver Cowdery, the Mormon Church’s “second elder,” challenged prophet Joseph Smith on points of doctrine, Smith’s spokesman gave a sermon declaring that dissidents like Cowdery “be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.”


http://www.slate.com/id/2267688/entry/0/

Making Art With Your Spouse—and Living To Tell the Tale

By Joshua Wolf Shenk

Illustration of Robbi and Matthew. Click image to expand.The creative pairs series so far: “Two Is the Magic Number” critiqued the lone-genius theory and introduced a new science of creative collaboration. “Two of Us” told the drama, in three acts, of the epic and often misunderstood Lennon/McCartney creative duel. Today, we have part one of the adventures of Matthew Swanson and Robbi Behr of “Idiots’Books,” who’ve offered themselves as human guinea pigs (or, shall we say, crash-test dummies?) to sample methods that might shed light on collaboration, relationships, and creativity.

To continue the conversation, please comment below, tweet #creativepairs, or join the Creative Pairs Facebook page.

Is grave conflict inevitable in creative pairs? Will the very flames that heat fiery exchanges always cause third-degree burns, too?

It sure is common. Gilbert and Sullivan came to loathe each other. Pete Townshend once smashed his guitar over Roger Daltrey‘s head—and Daltrey hauled off and knocked Townshend unconscious. Even that rock ‘n’ roll tantrum (which makes John Lennon and Paul McCartney look like choirboys) falls far short of the violent extremes: After Oliver Cowdery, the Mormon Church’s “second elder,” challenged prophet Joseph Smith on points of doctrine, Smith’s spokesman gave a sermon declaring that dissidents like Cowdery “be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.” Leer más “Meet the Idiots [WTF!!!]”

Pagaron 15 mil dólares por el inodoro de Lennon

El músico se lo había regalado a un albañil que remodelaba su casa. Le propuso que se lo quedara y lo usara como maceta. Lo conservó durante 40 años pero tras su muerte, su yerno lo vendió

Un inodoro que perteneció a John Lennon fue subastado en Liverpool por 15.000 dólares, casi diez veces el precio de partida, indicó uno de los organizadores del remate.

El inodoro de porcelana blanca y decorado con motivos florales azules fue utilizado por el célebre músico de los Beatles durante tres años, cuando vivía en Tittenhurst Park, en el condado de Berkshire (sudeste de Inglaterra) entre 1969 y 1972.

El objeto, estimado entre 750 y 1.000 libras en el catálogo, fue comprado en una subasta de objetos relacionados con los Beatles.


El músico se lo había regalado a un albañil que remodelaba su casa. Le propuso que se lo quedara y lo usara como maceta. Lo conservó durante 40 años pero tras su muerte, su yerno lo vendió

Un inodoro que perteneció a John Lennon fue subastado en Liverpool por 15.000 dólares, casi diez veces el precio de partida, indicó uno de los organizadores del remate.

El inodoro de porcelana blanca y decorado con motivos florales azules fue utilizado por el célebre músico de los Beatles durante tres años, cuando vivía en Tittenhurst Park, en el condado de Berkshire (sudeste de Inglaterra) entre 1969 y 1972.

El objeto, estimado entre 750 y 1.000 libras en el catálogo, fue comprado en una subasta de objetos relacionados con los Beatles. Leer más “Pagaron 15 mil dólares por el inodoro de Lennon”

Elvis Died 33 Years Ago Today and He’s Still Everywhere!

Today is the 33rd anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death. He was 42 then, so that means he would have been 75 today — the same age as the Dalai Lama and Woody Allen. That’s hard to imagine.

Still, I think it’s fair to say that Elvis changed the world.

Yeah, it’s easy to goof on Fat Elvis, with his sequinned jumpsuits and voracious appetite, but I’m not talking about Fat Elvis.


by jeremywaite

Today is the 33rd anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death. He was 42 then, so that means he would have been 75 today — the same age as the Dalai Lama and Woody Allen. That’s hard to imagine.

Still, I think it’s fair to say that Elvis changed the world.

Yeah, it’s easy to goof on Fat Elvis, with his sequinned jumpsuits and voracious appetite, but I’m not talking about Fat Elvis. Leer más “Elvis Died 33 Years Ago Today and He’s Still Everywhere!”

Finish Your Masterpiece with Deliberate Goal Planning

tip
by Glen Stansberry

All artists want to create massive, powerful works to be remembered by. We have visions of our own “Sistine Chapel” that we want to tackle before we die. The problem with epic projects is that they’re often started, but rarely finished. This is precisely why we celebrate massive works: they don’t come along very often. The Sistine Chapel took four years of painting the most difficult form of fresco – buon fresco – on rickety scaffolding, while bending over backwards. (Even Michelangelo was suspicious that his enemies purposely gave the project such a massive scope just to see him fail.1)

Finishing masterpieces is daunting. Over time, motivation and desire fade unless we make deliberate strides toward our goals every single day. But getting into the mindset of being deliberate with our work is a paradigm shift. Being deliberate means that when we are working, we are always working on something with an end goal in mind.

Finishing masterpieces is daunting. Over time, motivation and desire fade.

When the Beatles started a recording session, they never knew what sounds they would produce in the studio. But they knew one thing: they wanted every recording to sound different than the previous. John Lennon said this about their process: “Each time we just want to do something different… Why should we ever want to go back? That would be soft.”

If establishing such a goal during the nascent stages of a project seems daunting, it needn’t be. Laying out your end game merely means being clear about what you’re trying to achieve with a given creative project. For Michelangelo, it was as specific as paint 5,000 square feet of the Sistine Chapel. For the Beatles, it was as broad as make a record that sounds like something completely new.

The important thing is to be clear about the goal. Once you have that, you can backfill the details and tasks needed to get there – and, most likely, revise them as you gather feedback and experience along the way. Here are a few ways to get started:


by Glen Stansberry
All artists want to create massive, powerful works to be remembered by. We have visions of our own “Sistine Chapel” that we want to tackle before we die. The problem with epic projects is that they’re often started, but rarely finished. This is precisely why we celebrate massive works: they don’t come along very often. The Sistine Chapel took four years of painting the most difficult form of fresco – buon fresco – on rickety scaffolding, while bending over backwards. (Even Michelangelo was suspicious that his enemies purposely gave the project such a massive scope just to see him fail.1)

Finishing masterpieces is daunting. Over time, motivation and desire fade unless we make deliberate strides toward our goals every single day. But getting into the mindset of being deliberate with our work is a paradigm shift. Being deliberate means that when we are working, we are always working on something with an end goal in mind.

Finishing masterpieces is daunting. Over time, motivation and desire fade.

When the Beatles started a recording session, they never knew what sounds they would produce in the studio. But they knew one thing: they wanted every recording to sound different than the previous. John Lennon said this about their process: “Each time we just want to do something different… Why should we ever want to go back? That would be soft.”

If establishing such a goal during the nascent stages of a project seems daunting, it needn’t be. Laying out your end game merely means being clear about what you’re trying to achieve with a given creative project. For Michelangelo, it was as specific as paint 5,000 square feet of the Sistine Chapel. For the Beatles, it was as broad as make a record that sounds like something completely new.

The important thing is to be clear about the goal. Once you have that, you can backfill the details and tasks needed to get there – and, most likely, revise them as you gather feedback and experience along the way. Here are a few ways to get started: Leer más “Finish Your Masterpiece with Deliberate Goal Planning”