How Long Does It Take To Build A Native Mobile App? [Infographic] | readwrite.com


by Dan Rowinski | readwrite.com

The last several years have seen an explosion in mobile applications. By the end of 2013, both Android’s Google Play and the Apple iOS App Store will be hosting a million apps – and we have only seen minor signs of slowing growth.

Where the heck are all these apps coming from? Thousands upon thousands of developers are working hard to pump out games, social networks, utility and productivity apps, news readers… if you can dream it, someone is building an app for it.

So, how much time and effort is going into feeding this beast? Exactly how long does it take to build a quality native mobile app (not a mobile Web, HTML5 app)? Boston-based Backend-as-a-Service (BaaS) mobile-cloud-platform vendor Kinvey set out to answer just that question.

More Than 4 Months!?  >>> Leer más “How Long Does It Take To Build A Native Mobile App? [Infographic] | readwrite.com”

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How a New “Influencer” App Could be Your Most Powerful Content Marketing Weapon


By JOE CHERNOV
Content Marketing Institute

Last week, a member of a private Facebook group comprised of social media professionals asked if anyone could supply a list of influential event marketers. So far, only two names have been suggested. Yet in the past 90 seconds, I identified 297. Or, more accurately, Little Bird, a newly launched start-up founded by former ReadWriteWeb editor Marshall Kirkpatrick, did.

Little Bird is essentially a search engine for influencers, but unlike services such as Klout that assign a “reputation score” to people, Kirkpatrick’s tool starts with a topic and, based on Byzantine connections throughout the social graph surrounding the issue, works backward to the “insiders” who are most influential about that particular subject. 

Take “content marketing,” for example. Little Bird tells me Content Marketing Institute’s Joe Pulizzi tops the list of influencers, followed by Michael BrennerLee OddenC.C. Chapman and myself. Of course, naming the “known” people is the easy part. After all, Pulizzi runs this blog, Brenner and I were up for content marketer of the year, and Odden and Chapman have both written books on the subject. But Little Bird’s algorithm does more than surface the obvious. For example, it tells me that since making a move to OpenView Labs, Kevin Cain has begun making a name for himself in content marketing; that Deana Goldasich and Robert Rose have risen to prominence by listening to the right voices; and that nearly everything Cheryl Burgess tweets gets shared broadly.

In other words, Little Bird might just become a content marketer’s most powerful weapon, because it addresses the practitioner’s three most pressing needs: more content, better content, and wider distribution.

More content 

There is only so much you can write about your product or to your ideal customer persona before you begin repeating yourself. At some point, effective content marketers need to publish about topics adjacent to their product and buyer. They need to cast a wider net, so to speak. This is where Little Bird comes in.

Let’s say your company retrofits big offices with cables and locks to prevent laptops from being stolen. While most of your content will address the needs of IT and security personnel, you may also wish to capture the attention of facilities leaders and interior designers. You may even want office furniture manufacturers to consider integrating your attachment system into the industrial designs for future desks.

Chances are, you don’t know who these people are, what blogs they read, or what they care about. Little Bird can tell you not only who these insiders are, but also what topics they are talking about and what articles they are sharing. Imagine all of the real-time content ideas this information could inspire.

Better content (full story)

Why Your Content Must Spring Legs and Walk Around The World


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano the name of the game

This piece is from Convince&Convert, I selected it because it addresses a challenge that those of us who create or curate content face on a daily basis – how do we make our content socialable?

Here’s an excerpt:

We know how difficult it can be to find balance between intrigue and usefulness. We understand that it is much easier to talk about or simply develop a tool than it is to create a talkable tool.

Meanwhile, there is a realization that we need to develop a hybrid content marketing solution – one that is social and has substance.

Socialable content has to invite discussion, create a call to action, while informing people.

Here are some highlights:

Give your content youtility:

**Answer common questions. Does your website have a FAQ section?
**Why not translate that into useful, shareable content?
**Ask your consumer base what they need. What better way to find out what appeals to your customers than simply asking them.

Make Your Content Talkable:

**Make your content human. Sometimes utilities can fall flat if we don’t offer a way to show how they can and have impacted others
**Provide testimonials and attach real stories to your utilities so your audience can identify with their purpose.
**Add bits of entertainment, humor, fun. Is your content just boring?
**Give it elements that people would actually want to share and talk about. Simply add the ability to share. Creating something useful is more than half the battle. Often times, we just forget to let our audience spread the word. Leer más “Why Your Content Must Spring Legs and Walk Around The World”