10 Post-Interview Reflections

After an interview, it’s important to take a lot of deep cleansing breaths and reflect about the “process.” If you’ve been at a job search for a while, really excited about this particular position or just aren’t sure how to gauge your performance, use these questions as a guide. More importantly, use your answers to become the better, smarter candidate:

1. Did you feel comfortable during the interview?
2. Which questions could you have answered better?
3. Where were you successful? And not so much?
4. Were there awkward silences?
5. Were you able to demonstrate your understanding of the organization?
6. How was your conversational style?
7. Did the interviewer ask questions that you couldn’t answer?
8. Did the interviewer have any concerns about your work history, candidacy or skills?
9. Were you able to ask questions at the end about the organization or position? If so, were the answers helpful?
10. Would you do anything differently next time? Or say something different?

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After an interview, it’s important to take a lot of deep cleansing breaths and reflect about the “process.”  If you’ve been at a job search for a while, really excited about this particular position or just aren’t sure how to gauge your performance, use these questions as a guide. More importantly, use your answers to become the better, smarter candidate:

  1. Did you feel comfortable during the interview?
  2. Which questions could you have answered better?
  3. Where were you successful?  And not so much?
  4. Were there awkward silences?
  5. Were you able to demonstrate your understanding of the organization?
  6. How was your conversational style?
  7. Did the interviewer ask questions that you couldn’t answer?
  8. Did the interviewer have any concerns about your work history, candidacy or skills?
  9. Were you able to ask questions at the end about the organization or position? If so, were the answers helpful?
  10. Would you do anything differently next time? Or say something different? Leer más “10 Post-Interview Reflections”

The Lunch Interview: 10 Ways to Survive a Full Plate of Anxiety

If you are new to the job search or a recent college graduate, it is highly likely that you’ll be invited to interview over a meal – breakfast, lunch or dinner. If so, you may (with good reason) be nervous. Your potential employer is interested in getting to know you better, anxious to see how you behave in a public setting and lastly, hoping that you will meet their high expectations.

Before you get too anxious about which fork to use, this etiquette refresher will help. My colleagues and I have witnessed some of the poorest manners by some of the most well- qualified candidates. For example, there was the candidate who brought her own breakfast to the “breakfast interview” and confused the table when she declined to order from the menu. It all made sense when she brought the muffin out of her purse, and placed it on the plate to eat after we’d all ordered breakfast. There is the story about the almost-CEO that talked constantly with his mouth full of food, the woman who reapplied her lipstick twice, and the young man texting while others were talking at the table. Given these examples, I am going to remind my readers of good etiquette: [Más…]


If you are new to the job search or a recent college graduate, it is highly likely that you’ll be invited to interview over a meal – breakfast, lunch or dinner.  If so, you may (with good reason) be nervous.  Your potential employer is interested in getting to know you better, anxious to see how you behave in a public setting and lastly, hoping that you will meet their high expectations.

Before you get too anxious about which fork to use, this etiquette refresher will help. My colleagues and  I have witnessed some of the poorest manners by some of the most well- qualified candidates.  For example, there was the candidate who brought her own breakfast to the “breakfast interview” and confused the table when she declined to order from the menu.  It all made sense when she brought the muffin out of her purse, and placed it on the plate to eat after we’d all ordered breakfast. There is the story about the almost-CEO that talked constantly with his mouth full of food, the woman who reapplied her lipstick twice, and the young man texting while others were talking at the table.  Given these examples, I am going to remind my readers of good etiquette: Leer más “The Lunch Interview: 10 Ways to Survive a Full Plate of Anxiety”

You and Your Rockstar Resume

I admit that I have spent way too much time trying to find the “best post” for today, and after a long weekend, I am feeling overwhelmed by all my choices and ideas. So, I’m finally done talking, and have chosen to write about two alternative resume formats including a “Social Resume” and VisualCV – both are online tools aimed at helping candidates tell their best story through personal branding. These shouldn’t replace your “old school” resume format, but they may provide additional networking opportunities:

The Social Resume: Our friends at the Brazen Careerist Network launched a new platform this past March, aimed specifically at Generation Y’ers (those born after 1978). This tool is intended to get conversation started online in “real time” and bring the younger set to the forefront of ideas, strategy and thought. If you’re an entry to mid-level career person, this site is for you. The Social Resume is a one-of-a-kind, interactive showcase of your top ideas from around the web. According to Brazen, “this online tool provides a place to organize your thoughts and ideas so that employers, colleagues and friends don’t forget just how smart your really are.” Geared to the post 1978 crowd, the Brazen Careerist site attracts recruiters to its site as thousands of potential employees showcase their potential, strategic thinking and online branding effort.


I admit that I have spent way too much time trying to find the “best post” for today, and after a long weekend, I am feeling overwhelmed by all my choices and ideas.  So, I’m finally done talking, and have chosen to write about two alternative resume formats including  a “Social Resume” and VisualCV – both are online tools aimed at helping candidates tell their best story through personal branding.  These shouldn’t replace your “old school” resume format, but they may provide additional networking opportunities:

The Social Resume: Our friends at the Brazen Careerist Network launched a new platform this past March, aimed specifically at Generation Y‘ers (those born after 1978). This tool is intended to get conversation started online in “real time” and bring the younger set to the forefront of ideas, strategy and thought. If you’re an entry to mid-level career person, this site is for you. The Social Resume is a one-of-a-kind, interactive showcase of your top ideas from around the web. According to Brazen, “this online tool provides a place to organize your thoughts and ideas so that employers, colleagues and friends don’t forget just how smart your really are.”  Geared to the post 1978 crowd, the Brazen Careerist site attracts recruiters to its site as thousands of potential employees showcase their potential, strategic thinking and online branding effort. Leer más “You and Your Rockstar Resume”

Keeping Up with the Joneses – 10 Ways to Stay Upwardly Mobile

The best part of my work involves talking directly to candidates, professionals and others searching for their next, best gig. I spend a lot of time listening carefully, asking questions, pushing for details and of course, encouraging job seekers to push the envelope whenever possible. Many times, people have one foot out the door before they should.

Are you preparing your resume and anxiously looking for your next job because you think opportunities are slim, advancement is limited or there is little room for professional growth? If so, this post is for you! I speak from experience when I give this advice – I once left a great job because I thought I had hit the wall with few chances for advancement.


The best part of my work involves talking directly to candidates, professionals and others searching for their next, best gig.  I spend a lot of time listening carefully, asking questions, pushing for details and of course, encouraging job seekers to push the envelope whenever possible. Many times, people have one foot out the door before they should.

Are you preparing your resume and anxiously looking for your next job because you think opportunities are slim, advancement is limited or there is little room for professional growth? If so, this post is for you!  I speak from experience when I give this advice – I once left a great job because I thought I had hit the wall with few chances for advancement. Leer más “Keeping Up with the Joneses – 10 Ways to Stay Upwardly Mobile”

If Google Can’t Find You, You Don’t Exist

by Rosetta Thurman May 19

Everyone thinks that young professionals have completely mastered the art of social media. The stereotype is that Generation Y is always online, and companies are eager to tap the tech savvy minds of the “Facebook Generation”. I even took on that assumption during an interview I conducted for a new position my organization was hiring for. I asked the candidate, a recent grad in her early 20s, to share her experience using social media tools. She told me she knew how to use Ning, but didn’t know much about Myspace, Facebook, or Twitter. I almost fell out of my chair. For shame! A Generation Y job seeker who didn’t even have a Facebook profile? Where had she been living, under a rock with no access to wi-fi? For a job that involved communications and marketing, this was a big deficit in her knowledge. I was also a little miffed that I couldn’t find out any additional information about her online.


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Image via CrunchBase

by Rosetta Thurman May 19

Everyone thinks that young professionals have completely mastered the art of social media. The stereotype is that Generation Y is always online, and companies are eager to tap the tech savvy minds of the “Facebook Generation”. I even took on that assumption during an interview I conducted for a new position my organization was hiring for. I asked the candidate, a recent grad in her early 20s, to share her experience using social media tools. She told me she knew how to use Ning, but didn’t know much about Myspace, Facebook, or Twitter. I almost fell out of my chair. For shame! A Generation Y job seeker who didn’t even have a Facebook profile? Where had she been living, under a rock with no access to wi-fi? For a job that involved communications and marketing, this was a big deficit in her knowledge. I was also a little miffed that I couldn’t find out any additional information about her online. Leer más “If Google Can’t Find You, You Don’t Exist”