5 Ways to Get Email Overload Under Control


Mashable

Dmitri Leonov is vice president of growth at Sanebox. Follow him at @dmitri.

If you’re like most people with a connection to the internet and a job that requires you interact via email, then you probably know what email hell feels like. The only good news is that you’re not alone. In fact, the average person gets more than one hundred emails per day. The bad news is it’s not getting better.

The number of emails you receive will continue to grow every year. So what, if anything, can you do to get a grip on this email avalanche? Start with these five tips.

1. Set a Time Limit

According to a recent McKinsey Global Institute report, people spent 28% of their time writing, reading, and answering email. Most of it is unproductive because email is reactive by nature. The inherent gamification of clearing your inbox provides a brief feeling of accomplishment. But unless you’re doing customer support, your job description probably doesn’t include “respond to every email.”

Answering email is just one part of work. That’s why you should determine how much time you want to spend in your inbox on a given day, and don’t exceed it. One suggestion is to dedicate 15-minute blocks every two hours to staying on top of email without letting it take over your day.

2. Know Your Etiquette Leer más “5 Ways to Get Email Overload Under Control”

12 Ways to Optimize Your Resume for Applicant Tracking Systems


See on Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Mona Abdel-Halim is the co-founder of Resunate.com, a job application tool that tailors and optimizes your resume for a specific job. You can find Mona and Resunate on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

You filled out the job application, updated your resume and clicked “Submit.” But as the days or weeks pass, you never receive a phone call or email from the employer. What happened?

Unbeknownst to many job seekers, a whopping 72% of resumes are never seen by human eyes. Why? Well, employers large and small now use applicant tracking software to parse the information from your resume and map it into a database called an ATS (applicant tracking system). From this information, the system will assign you a score based on how well you match the job the employer is trying to fill, and then rank and sort all candidates. Naturally, the potential employees with the highest scores move on, while others are left in the dust.

Wondering how you can optimize your resume and rank highly in the employer’s ATS? Here are several tricks to improving your resume’s score.

1. Use Language from the Job Description: Look through the job listing to determine the skills required. Identify industry terms, buzzwords and jargon the hiring manager uses most frequently in the description and incorporate these words into your resume when possible and applicable — the ATS is looking for these keywords… Leer más “12 Ways to Optimize Your Resume for Applicant Tracking Systems”

Prepping Candidates and Taming Hiring Managers

Most candidates — even high-level executives — need to be prepped before the interview. The reason for this is obvious: they all think they’re great interviewees. Most aren’t. Making matters worse, the hiring managers they’ll be meeting think they’re endowed with some special instinct that allows them to accurately assess candidate competency. Most aren’t.

Since I don’t like to present great candidates who get inadvertently excluded for dumb reasons, I need to prep both my hiring manager clients and my candidates to increase the likelihood the candidates are appropriately and accurately evaluated. This way I don’t have to do searches over again and rely on luck to make placements.

To be taken seriously on this point I had to write a book: Hire With Your Head. Basically it describes a process on how to get hiring managers and candidates on the same page. From the hiring manager’s perspective, it’s describing the work as a series of performance objectives required for on-the-job success. (I refer to these as performance profiles.) From the candidate’s perspective, it’s having them describe a comparable accomplishment for each performance objective. For example, let’s assume the job required the new product marketing manager to develop and launch 25 new iPad apps over the course of the next year. During the interview you’d ask the candidate to describe in detail some comparable product-marketing-related accomplishment. I suggest spending 10-15 minutes getting lots of details for each accomplishment. (Here’s my one-question interview article I wrote for ERE in 2001 on how to do this.) These performance objectives can be split among the hiring team; then, during the collective debrief, the team can rank the candidate on how well the accomplishments compare.

At least that’s the theory. In the field other things happen to mess up this plan.


Photograph taken during the California rodeo, Salinas, 2006 edition Copyright © 2006 David MonniauxMost candidates — even high-level executives — need to be prepped before the interview. The reason for this is obvious: they all think they’re great interviewees. Most aren’t. Making matters worse, the hiring managers they’ll be meeting think they’re endowed with some special instinct that allows them to accurately assess candidate competency. Most aren’t.

Since I don’t like to present great candidates who get inadvertently excluded for dumb reasons, I need to prep both my hiring manager clients and my candidates to increase the likelihood the candidates are appropriately and accurately evaluated. This way I don’t have to do searches over again and rely on luck to make placements.

To be taken seriously on this point I had to write a book: Hire With Your Head. Basically it describes a process on how to get hiring managers and candidates on the same page. From the hiring manager’s perspective, it’s describing the work as a series of performance objectives required for on-the-job success. (I refer to these as performance profiles.) From the candidate’s perspective, it’s having them describe a comparable accomplishment for each performance objective. For example, let’s assume the job required the new product marketing manager to develop and launch 25 new iPad apps over the course of the next year. During the interview you’d ask the candidate to describe in detail some comparable product-marketing-related accomplishment. I suggest spending 10-15 minutes getting lots of details for each accomplishment. (Here’s my one-question interview article I wrote for ERE in 2001 on how to do this.) These performance objectives can be split among the hiring team; then, during the collective debrief, the team can rank the candidate on how well the accomplishments compare.

At least that’s the theory. In the field other things happen to mess up this plan. Leer más “Prepping Candidates and Taming Hiring Managers”

5 Things Recruiters Should Stop Doing

First the good news: many companies are hiring again. Now the bad news: if your company is among them, you’re probably looking at too many requisitions and too few hands on deck to fill them. And, even if you’re not in that boat, you’re probably feeling the pressure to do more with less.

In either case, your team can benefit from persuading recruiters to eliminate the five time-wasters below. By streamlining their work, recruiters will have more time to focus on the most valuable aspects of the hiring process. The results will be:

* Better hiring decisions
* An improved candidate experience
* A more cost-effective approach to talent acquisition


First the good news: many companies are hiring again. Now the bad news: if your company is among them, you’re probably looking at too many requisitions and too few hands on deck to fill them. And, even if you’re not in that boat, you’re probably feeling the pressure to do more with less.

In either case, your team can benefit from persuading recruiters to eliminate the five time-wasters below. By streamlining their work, recruiters will have more time to focus on the most valuable aspects of the hiring process. The results will be:

Frustrated at Work? Make a Case for Change

Have you ever sat at your desk, quietly cursing your boss for failing to understand your untapped creative gifts? Or maybe just biding your time until she intuits that life would be 1000% easier for you if the company had more interns? We are often guilty of waiting – particularly when it comes to innovating within our own job description or work culture. We expect our bosses and co-workers to intuit our needs. How could they NOT see that you are eminently qualified to helm the new project your company just landed? How could they NOT observe that your monitor is on the fritz and it’s killing your productivity? How could they NOT notice you’ve clearly outgrown your current position and are no longer challenged?



by Jocelyn K. Glei

Have you ever sat at your desk, quietly cursing your boss for failing to understand your untapped creative gifts? Or maybe just biding your time until she intuits that life would be 1000% easier for you if the company had more interns? We are often guilty of waiting – particularly when it comes to innovating within our own job description or work culture. We expect our bosses and co-workers to intuit our needs. How could they NOT see that you are eminently qualified to helm the new project your company just landed? How could they NOT observe that your monitor is on the fritz and it’s killing your productivity? How could they NOT notice you’ve clearly outgrown your current position and are no longer challenged? Leer más “Frustrated at Work? Make a Case for Change”

Quick Guide: Job Posting Best Practices


Monster.com
Downlad PDF

This task aid will help you create job postings to help you find the best candidates more efficiently and effectively.

Read Quick Guide: Job Posting Best Practices »

Page 1 ©2009 Monster – All Rights Reserved
Tip #1: Think Like a Job Seeker
The first step in creating a job posting is to understand what your ideal job seeker wants. Job seekers see location, company quality & security, corporate culture, work environment, schedule/hours, and salary as the most important pieces of criteria when they are deciding whether or not to apply for a job. As you can see, job seekers view every aspect of the position, well beyond just the basic qualifications. You should provide as much of this information as possible in your job posting.
You should also think about providing information such as special sign-on advantages, perks, bonuses after completing licenses, etc. that will make your postings stand out. This is yet another opportunity for you to differentiate your job from your competition.
Tip #2: Develop an Effective Job Title
The highest amount of job seeker traffic is on weekdays from 10am-11am EST, while job seekers are at work. Think about how fast they are reviewing their search results. The first job titles they’ll click on are the ones that are most relevant to the job they are seeking.
So, you need to give some thought to the job title of your posting. Here are Monster’s recommendations:

Use the industry standard for your job title. You may call your recruiters “Recruitment Consultants”, but “Recruiter” is a better bet for your job title, because more candidates will be searching on this term.

Include skills that are relevant to the position. In the “Recruiter” example, be specific – are you looking for a “Corporate Recruiter” or a “Financial Recruiter”?

Always avoid using plural job titles. You may have 5 recruiter openings, but job seekers search for “Recruiter”, not “Recruiters”.

Avoid acronyms, abbreviations, and references to internal organizations. Seekers aren’t searching for an Admin Assist. They’re searching for an “Administrative Assistant”.

Include the level of the position, but avoid using numbers and letters that represent the level of the position internally. If you need a “Senior Recruiter”, write that as your title, rather than “Recruiter II”.
Tip #3: Write a Compelling Opening Paragraph
This is a critical component of your job posting. Your opening paragraph needs to spark the interest of the job seeker! If you don’t catch their attention now, then you may lose it completely.
Your opening paragraph should include a clear overview of the position and what’s in it for the job seeker.
Information that positions you as an employer of choice should also be included. Let qualified job seekers know why they should choose you as an employer despite all of the other options.
JOB POSTING BEST PRACTICES
Page 2 ©2009 Monster – All Rights Reserved
Tip #4: Develop a Detailed, Clear, and Concise Job Description
Your content is THE MOST IMPORTANT element of any job posting. Having solid content will always help your jobs perform, particularly in the Job Description area, because job seekers take literal notice of this area. Their number one complaint is vague job descriptions. Their number two complaint is inflated requirements.
So you need to provide detailed information that is relevant and easy to read. Resist the temptation to simply copy and paste the HR/client job description; think about what you are writing and speak directly to the job seeker. Talk to people on their level and in the second person, using “you” and “your” rather than “we” and “our”.
Make sure that you describe qualifications realistically. They should describe what the job seeker will be doing in that position. It’s also important to differentiate between required and preferred qualifications. Choose your words carefully because it will affect your response rate dramatically.
Tip #5: Include Popular Keywords
As you’re selecting keywords to use, think about which ones a job seeker would use in their search. Make sure that the most popular keywords which are relevant to your job are listed in the job title. They should also be included in the body of your posting, at least twice. This boosts the relevance score of your job posting and places it higher in the list of a job seeker’s search results. If a job seeker searches by keyword, then the postings with the highest keyword match will be listed first.
Monster currently caps relevance at two occurrences of the same keyword. Putting the same keyword more than twice does not help your overall score.
Tip #6: Describe the Benefits of the Job
Top performers are typically aware that they have a choice of where they work, so they are particularly interested in hearing why they should work for your company rather than your competition.
Think about the benefits and unique features of your job that might cause someone to leave the job they have to take your position. Describe the challenges of the position and intrigue the ideal candidates. For example, will the role give the candidate the opportunity to build something from the ground up?
Remember that benefits aren’t just limited to health, dental and PTO…think of things like location, work environment, team culture, etc.
JOB POSTING BEST PRACTICES
Page 3 ©2009 Monster – All Rights Reserved
Tip #7: Specify Job Information
Job seekers use information regarding the type of job, career level, the number of years of experience, and education level to filter and refine their results on Monster. They know what they’re looking for and use these filters to find it.
By including these pieces of information, your job posting should be seen by candidates who are most interested in it, and it should attract more relevant candidates.
Tip #8: Specify “How to Apply” and “Next Steps”
It seems obvious, but closing your posting with a clear call to action is commonly overlooked. It’s important for you to provide the job seeker with clear instructions for applying to your position. It’s also important that you:

Make it easy for them

Motivate the candidate to act

Create a sense of urgency
However, you should limit the number of response options that you make available to job seekers. Too many options can be confusing.
Tip #9: Preview Your Job Posting
Search for and preview your job posting before you post it to the Monster site. Look at it from a job seeker’s perspective. Ask yourself: Is the title clear and specific? Does the opening paragraph draw me in? Is the layout appealing? Does it clearly outline the requirements and qualifications of the position? Does it differentiate our company from other companies? If I were a top applicant for this job, would I apply to this job? Hopefully, you answered “Yes!”
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