Most Americans still don’t have smartphones

Editor’s note: Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

(CNN) — If you’re a tech news junkie (and that’s why you’re reading CNN.com Tech, right?), you might have gotten the impression that everyone already has — or at least wants — a smartphone. Or that smartphones and tablets are the only mobile devices that matter.

But new research from Forrester indicates that while cell phone penetration is high across all U.S. demographics (82 percent of consumers own a cell phone, and 73 percent report that cell phones are their “most used device”), only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone.

This is true even among the most digitally savvy generations: Gen X (roughly ages 31-40) and Gen Y (roughly ages 18-30).

According to Forrester, Gen Yers and Gen Xers are most likely to own smartphones. However, less than one-fourth of cell phone users in both of those age groups own a smartphone.

Also, Forrester reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.

All of which means that the vast majority (more than 75 percent) of the “digital native” generations does not use smartphones. Instead, they rely on cheaper, simpler-feature phones and limited access to mobile data-supported services.

Of course, feature phones are getting smarter. Many of the the most popular feature phones can do a lot beyond voice calls — from text and multimedia messaging to e-mail, to social media, to web browsing, to even running simple apps based on JavaME.

Granted, feature phones generally offer a more difficult and limited digital experience (especially for web browsing). But that doesn’t stop people from using feature phones in sophisticated ways.

In fact, according to Forrester’s figures, just under half of all U.S. mobile owners have internet access from their cell phone. So, since only 17 percent of U.S. cell users have a smartphone, this means that the vast majority of Americans who are able access the mobile internet use feature phones.

But being able to do something is not the same as actually doing it. Just under a quarter of U.S. mobile owners report going online from their phones.

The simplest mobile activities remain the most popular across all types of cell phones. Topping Forrester’s list is SMS text messaging, which nearly 60 percent of all U.S. mobile owners use.

Despite the booming popularity of social networks like Facebook and Twitter, Forrester found that social networking services are one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions: Only 14 percent of U.S. mobile users access such services from their phones.

In this report, Forrester seems to be trying to spin its findings to make smartphones sound like the most important current mobile trend. For instance, the report says, “Gen Yers and Gen Xers are the most likely to have smartphones and unlimited data plans, providing the tools needed to lead in mobile Internet adoption” — despite the fact that they’re describing the behavior of a minority in that age range.


Forrester Research reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.
Forrester Research reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone, a Forrester study finds
  • Less than a fourth of cell phone users in Gen X and Gen Y own a smartphone, study says
  • Study indicates social networking is one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions
  • But smartphones have spurred considerable growth in, and demand for, mobile services
RELATED TOPICS

Editor’s note: Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

(CNN) — If you’re a tech news junkie (and that’s why you’re reading CNN.com Tech, right?), you might have gotten the impression that everyone already has — or at least wants — a smartphone. Or that smartphones and tablets are the only mobile devices that matter.

But new research from Forrester indicates that while cell phone penetration is high across all U.S. demographics (82 percent of consumers own a cell phone, and 73 percent report that cell phones are their “most used device”), only 17 percent of Americans own a smartphone.

This is true even among the most digitally savvy generations: Gen X (roughly ages 31-40) and Gen Y (roughly ages 18-30).

According to Forrester, Gen Yers and Gen Xers are most likely to own smartphones. However, less than one-fourth of cell phone users in both of those age groups own a smartphone.

Also, Forrester reports that less than one-fourth of U.S. mobile phone owners have an unlimited data plan.

All of which means that the vast majority (more than 75 percent) of the “digital native” generations does not use smartphones. Instead, they rely on cheaper, simpler-feature phones and limited access to mobile data-supported services.

Of course, feature phones are getting smarter. Many of the the most popular feature phones can do a lot beyond voice calls — from text and multimedia messaging to e-mail, to social media, to web browsing, to even running simple apps based on JavaME.

Granted, feature phones generally offer a more difficult and limited digital experience (especially for web browsing). But that doesn’t stop people from using feature phones in sophisticated ways.

In fact, according to Forrester’s figures, just under half of all U.S. mobile owners have internet access from their cell phone. So, since only 17 percent of U.S. cell users have a smartphone, this means that the vast majority of Americans who are able access the mobile internet use feature phones.

But being able to do something is not the same as actually doing it. Just under a quarter of U.S. mobile owners report going online from their phones.

The simplest mobile activities remain the most popular across all types of cell phones. Topping Forrester’s list is SMS text messaging, which nearly 60 percent of all U.S. mobile owners use.

Despite the booming popularity of social networks like Facebook and Twitter, Forrester found that social networking services are one of the least popular non-voice mobile communication functions: Only 14 percent of U.S. mobile users access such services from their phones.

In this report, Forrester seems to be trying to spin its findings to make smartphones sound like the most important current mobile trend. For instance, the report says, “Gen Yers and Gen Xers are the most likely to have smartphones and unlimited data plans, providing the tools needed to lead in mobile Internet adoption” — despite the fact that they’re describing the behavior of a minority in that age range. Leer más “Most Americans still don’t have smartphones”

How to Plan Mobile Enterprise Development Using Forrester’s POST Strategy

According to a new report from Forrester, mobile development has gone from being a separate silo to being mainstream. As more and more IT departments will be called upon to create mobile applications, Forrester recommends managers and developers adopt its POST (People, Objectives, Strategy, Technology) strategy. POST was actually created for marketing and business development professionals, but the company explains how to apply it to mobile application development.


Forrester logo According to a new report from Forrester, mobile development has gone from being a separate silo to being mainstream. As more and more IT departments will be called upon to create mobile applications, Forrester recommends managers and developers adopt its POST (People, Objectives, Strategy, Technology) strategy. POST was actually created for marketing and business development professionals, but the company explains how to apply it to mobile application development.

Executive Summary

[http://www.forrester.com/rb/Research/define_mobile_development_strategy/q/id/56935/t/2?src=RSS_CustomFeed&cm_mmc=Forrester-_-RSS-_-Document-_-6]

Developing mobile applications used to be an arcane activity pursued by highly specialized developers, but no more. The surge in popularity of Android devices, BlackBerries, and iPhones has application development professionals gearing up to incorporate mobile development into mainstream development processes. The first step in taking mobile development mainstream is defining your strategy. Learn from your peers in consumer product strategy by applying Forrester’s POST method to your mobile development efforts. Begin by understanding what types of mobile users you need to support. Next, determine your objectives, and then build a strategy based on your desired offering and level of corporate commitment to mobile. Once you have completed these three steps, then — and only then — should you choose from among the six mobile development styles at your disposal and the vendors that offer mobile platforms and tools that can aid your efforts.

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Use The POST Method To Get Started, But Keep Your Options Open

WHAT IT MEANS

  • Mobile Development Is Crossing The Chasm
  • Supplemental Material
  • Related Research Documents

People

The process begins with profiling your target audience. Forrester identifies four types of mobile users:

  • Task workers
  • Information workers
  • Wannabes
  • SuperConnecteds

Each has their own requirements and you need to determine what those are before starting. Leer más “How to Plan Mobile Enterprise Development Using Forrester’s POST Strategy”