¿Sabes pedir lo que necesitas?


imagen de la noticiaRRHH Press – Actualidad y noticias sobre Recursos Humanos, RRHH, laboral y empleo

Recursos Humanos RRHH Press – Cuando tenemos una carencia y no la podemos satisfacer nosotros mismos, necesitamos pedir ayuda. Esta necesidad nos posiciona en una situación de vulnerabilidad que a algunas personas les resulta difícil aceptar por miedo o vergüenza.

En general, cuando realizamos una petición quedamos expuestos a que nos digan que no, que el otro se incomode, que la relación se deteriore o que nuestra imagen pública se vea perjudicada.

Y en el ámbito laboral no cambian las cosas. Nos cuesta, por ejemplo, pedir una promoción, un miembro más para nuestro equipo o una mejora salarial, lo que nos puede generar frustración o resentimiento.

Para realizar peticiones efectivas:

  • Elige el lugar y el momento adecuados. Es importante prestar atención al contexto y procurar que sea el más adecuado posible. Esta idoneidad hay que buscarla atendiendo tanto a las circunstancias físicas y del entorno (lugar libre de interrupciones), como a las emocionales (receptividad del interlocutor).
  • Sé claro, directo y honesto. Haz la petición de manera abierta, asegurándote de que el interlocutor ha entendido lo que quieres. Procura ser muy específico y define la fecha en la que lo necesitas. No pierdas tiempo pensando en las posibles consecuencias negativas. Si la respuesta es afirmativa, lograrás lo que necesitas, y si es negativa, ahorrarás tiempo en elucubraciones y podrás buscar otras opciones. Leer más “¿Sabes pedir lo que necesitas?”
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World of Warcraft blocked in Iran


 

tgdaily.com

Blizzard has cut off access to World of Warcraft in Iran, citing US trade sanctions.

For the last week, players in the country have beencomplaining that they can no longer connect to the massivelymultiplayer game.

Finally, though, Blizzard has posted a statement on its player forum.

“United States trade restrictions and economic sanction laws prohibit Blizzard from doing business with residents of certain nations, including Iran. Several of you have seen and cited the text in the Terms of Use which relates to these government-imposed sanctions,” it reads.

“This week, Blizzard tightened up its procedures to ensure compliance with these laws, and players connecting from the affected nations are restricted from access to Blizzard games and services.” Leer más “World of Warcraft blocked in Iran”

From encryption to darknets: As governments snoop, activists fight back

In Iran, they would think about jamming as a first countermeasure.

In the wake of the Occupy protest movement in cities around the world, some online activists have gathered together to create The Darknet Projectand the Free Network Foundation, two rather quixotic attempts to re-engineer mesh networking to the point that it would encircle the globe and act as a giant encrypted network.

“With an ISP, the government can tell an ISP to cut that connection,” wrote a Reddit user named pomegranati in a recent post. “With a public network, especially if all the connections are anonymous, they won’t know where something is coming from or where something is going. They can track what’s happening, but they won’t be able to shut it down unless they go to every specific node and physically shut them down. Now, if the network is encrypted, then they won’t know what’s being sent.”

The problem for activists is that, just as in the mobile world, there are also real-world attacks that can compromise physical networks.

WiFi uses the same band of energy (2.4 GHz) that microwave ovens do, so getting a few people to stand on rooftops, Say Anything-style, would probably do much to disrupt any local mesh WiFi network within a radius of tens of meters.

“If you want to jam a wireless signal, you can just put a microwave on the roof and set it to full power,” Kaplan said. “In Iran, they would think about jamming as a first countermeasure, because it’s so extremely cheap.”

Plus, if the network is designed to have new nodes join easily, then it will be just as easy to add fake nodes, and to inject fake instructions into the network, confusing traffic or causing it to come to a halt entirely.

Doing the most good

Knowing how to use much of this technology at the level of detail required to stay reasonably safe is beyond most common users. For the majority of activists, properly vetted software and hardware protection of mobile phones and Internet connections may be too expensive or too complicated to set up and maintain properly.

But for those not well-versed in security, the hope for secure communications isn’t over. Some of the most dramatic worldwide gains come when the tech behemoths that we all rely on everyday start re-thinking their own approach to privacy.

“When Google turned on SSL by default, in January 2010, in one day that company did more to protect the privacy of activists than the rest of us have done since,” Chris Soghoian concluded.

“If Google encrypted the contents of your Android phone by default, that would provide a huge protection [for] people whose phones are stolen or are seized by the police. Those are the kind of protections that we need,” he added. “All these applications that people are creating, that activists are creating, and then abandoning six months after their funding runs out—those are just a waste of time. Those are never going to go anywhere and they’re never going to be used by anyone. We need technologies that can be used by millions of consumers, without playing with configuration options.”


By  | http://arstechnica.com
The Free Network Foundation has worldwide plans
The Free Network Foundation has worldwide plans

Darknets

Other projects have moved beyond mobile phones, trying to create new infrastructure that can be used by activists to spread an Internet connection across a wide area through either mesh networking or a related project spawned out of Anonymous and reddit, often referred to as a “darknet.”

For years, mesh networking projects have sprung up across the world as a way to share an Internet connection over a large geographic area. The idea is that each individual node can share data (including an Internet backhaul) with other local nodes, eventually cobbling together a much larger network.

Many community wireless projects got started in the early 2000s as a way to provide Internet access to underserved, and particularly rural communities. Since then, many have collapsed due to a corresponding rise in commercial Internet service, particularly 3G service provided via local mobile providers. Of the community WiFi networks that still operate, few are designed for encrypted, heavily secure communication. Activists instead are now trying to create community networks that are built from the ground up with security in mind.

Some have been more successful than others. Since 2003, for instance, the FunkFeuer network in Austria has worked on expanding its wireless network across many parts of the country. This past weekend, the two main hubs in Vienna and Graz were connected via a new node over the Alps, with the Graz network extending southward into neighboring Slovenia. Other similar city-scale projects exist in St. Louis, Oakland, Vancouver, Montevideo, and Athens.

“What you want to have is end-to-end encryption the whole time,” said Aaron Kaplan, one of the leaders of FunkFeuer. “If you rely on the encryption happening in between, it just takes one link to cheat on the encryption, which decrypt the packets, stores them, and then encrypts them again—like a man-in-the-middle attack.” Leer más “From encryption to darknets: As governments snoop, activists fight back”

Is YouTube Citizen Journalism Desensitizing Us?

YouTube has recently become one of the most popular mediums for spreading the word about human rights violations around the globe, from the death of female protester Neda Agha-Soltan after last year’s election in Iran to police brutality in Zanzibar and human rights abuses in Russian prisons. But while this influx of amateur footage of human rights violations is certainly giving us a better idea of the inhumanity going on in other parts of the world, I can’t help but wonder whether these snuff-like videos aren’t desensitizing us to these atrocities. The more videos we see of people being killed, beaten and treated like animals the less shocking it is. Is human rights citizen journalism desensitizing us?

YouTube has been working on a blog series with WITNESS, human rights video advocacy and training organization, and in their most recent post they ask YouTubers for their opinions on human rights in a series of questions. One of the most interesting questions that they ask regards our desensitization to human rights footage:

“In the past, in many countries, human rights images were largely filtered through the news media. But today, nearly everyone has seen a video or photo on the Internet that has made them aware of injustice. With access to these kinds of images getting easier, and more stories appearing from more places, the sheer quantity of this content risks either overwhelming viewers, or desensitizing us to its value. How do you think people can stay alert to the power of these images without becoming immune to them?”


Posted by Megan O’Neill

Every Human Has RightsYouTube has recently become one of the most popular mediums for spreading the word about human rights violations around the globe, from the death of female protester Neda Agha-Soltan after last year’s election in Iran to police brutality in Zanzibar and human rights abuses in Russian prisons.  But while this influx of amateur footage of human rights violations is certainly giving us a better idea of the inhumanity going on in other parts of the world, I can’t help but wonder whether these snuff-like videos aren’t desensitizing us to these atrocities.  The more videos we see of people being killed, beaten and treated like animals the less shocking it is.  Is human rights citizen journalism desensitizing us?

YouTube has been working on a blog series with WITNESS, human rights video advocacy and training organization, and in their most recent post they ask YouTubers for their opinions on human rights in a series of questions.  One of the most interesting questions that they ask regards our desensitization to human rights footage:

“In the past, in many countries, human rights images were largely filtered through the news media.  But today, nearly everyone has seen a video or photo on the Internet that has made them aware of injustice.  With access to these kinds of images getting easier, and more stories appearing from more places, the sheer quantity of this content risks either overwhelming viewers, or desensitizing us to its value.  How do you think people can stay alert to the power of these images without becoming immune to them?” Leer más “Is YouTube Citizen Journalism Desensitizing Us?”

The Growth and Impact of Social Media

This presentation looks at the growth of social media in the last few year and it also shares some important episodes from the social world that made an impact whether it’s Nestle caving to pressure on Palm Oil to elections in Iran or that fake BP PR account that won more followers than BP’s official twitter account.


What the F**k is Social Media NOW?

View more presentations from Espresso’s Infiltrators.

Social Media is now too big to ignore.

This presentation looks at the growth of social media in the last few year and it also shares some important episodes from the social world that made an impact whether it’s Nestle caving to pressure on Palm Oil to elections in Iran or that fake BP PR account that won more followers than BP’s official twitter account.

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JASON ELLIOT / THE NETWORK: VIRAL EMAIL PROMOTION

Now we are well aware that all of you lovely connected people will no doubt receive umpteen forwarded emails every day, bearing constantly amended titles such as: ‘You have to check this out’, or ‘So so funny – you have to read’ or the ever-intriguing ‘Awesome Friday fun LOL’.

Obviously, the clearly fake sarcastic email correspondance between a man and his uncooperative insurance company or pictures of cats on trampolines (can I haz bounce?) which follow, are almost always a dissapointment. Imagine our delight, therefore, when we were sent one that we actually enjoyed reading… [Más…]

It is perhaps no surprise that the copy was slick, sharp and engaging – it was keyed by a critically acclaimed writer, Jason Elliot. He is best known for his travel-based nonfiction, specifically, An Unexpected Light, Travels in Afghanistan and Mirrors of the Unseen, Journeys in Iran. His latest work, however, is something of a departure – a rip-roaring, Bourne-esque espionage thriller set just before the events of 9/11.

His email – sent presumably to most of the contacts in his address book – begins: ‘This message is to acquaint you with a new book released this week in the UK by Bloomsbury. It is not the kind of book I would normally read but, since I wrote it, I did have to study it quite closely.’

He follows by explaining, ‘Those of you who did not fully relish my last book about cryptic metaphysical symbolism in Persian geometric art will be relieved to know that The Network is a page-turning thriller. The terms ‘epistemological’ and ‘ontological’ do not appear. Instead, there are lots of details about guns, explosions, and descriptions of women from hot countries.’


JasonElliot_01.jpg

Now we are well aware that all of you lovely connected people will no doubt receive umpteen forwarded emails every day, bearing constantly amended titles such as: ‘You have to check this out’, or ‘So so funny – you have to read’ or the ever-intriguing ‘Awesome Friday fun LOL’.

Obviously, the clearly fake sarcastic email correspondance between a man and his uncooperative insurance company or pictures of cats on trampolines (can I haz bounce?) which follow, are almost always a dissapointment. Imagine our delight, therefore, when we were sent one that we actually enjoyed reading… Leer más “JASON ELLIOT / THE NETWORK: VIRAL EMAIL PROMOTION”