El IPv6 hace a los sitios un 80% más lentos


 

caracol

 

 

Hoy es el gran día para el IPv6, que se estrena en todo el mundo como nuevo protocolo a sustituir al ya muerto por el éxito IPv4. Sin embargo, en la gran jornada, no todo son buenas noticias. La compañíaCompuware acaba de hacer públicas las conclusiones de un análisis que apunta que el nuevo protocolo hace más lentos a los sitios.

En concreto, los sitios IPv6 son un 80% más lentos que aquellos que son IPv4, según apunta la firma en un comunicado. El IPv6 supone, aseguran, un “gran cambio en la arquitectura de internet”. La migración añade complejidad al modificar la forma de funcionamiento de los navegadores, las conexiones entre dispositivos y cómo operan y cómo se accede a los servicios.

Esta mayor lentitud puede además suponer un perjuicio para susvíctimas. Al ser más lenta, la experiencia de usuario pierde calidad y puede dañar a la reputación de la marca.

Más información sobre IPv6 en el especial sobre la materia

 

Anuncios

How to Secure Your Wireless (Wi-Fi) Home Network

It will decrease your Internet access speed since you are now sharing the same internet connection with other users.
It can create a security hazard* as others may hack your computers and access your personal files through your own wireless network.
What do the bad guys use – This is a public database of default usernames and passwords of wireless routers, modems, switches and other networking equipment. For instance, anyone can easily make out from the database that the factory-default settings for Linksys equipment can be accessed by using admin for both username and password fields.

Step 3. Change your Network’s SSID name
The SSID (or Wireless Network Name) of your Wireless Router is usually pre-defined as “default” or is set as the brand name of the router (e.g., linksys). Although this will not make your network inherently* more secure, changing the SSID name of your network is a good idea as it will make it more obvious for others to know which network they are connecting to.

This setting is usually under the basic wireless settings in your router’s settings page. Once this is set, you will always be sure that you are connecting to the correct Wireless network even if there are multiple wireless networks in your area. Don’t use your name, home address or other personal information in the SSID name.


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Learn how you can secure your wireless network fin simple steps. You can prevent hackers from intercepting your Wi-Fi network and also avoid casual users from using your wireless broadband connection.

This article describes how you can secure your Wireless Network from hackers and you’ll also learn about free tools that people generally use to intercept your Wi-Fi signals.
Wireless Networking (Wi-Fi) has made it so easy for you to use the computer, portable media player, mobile phones, video game consoles, and other wireless devices anywhere in the house without the clutter of cables. Leer más “How to Secure Your Wireless (Wi-Fi) Home Network”

This Lamp is Controlled by an Android Phone

The french developer of the unnamed project wrote this about the Android controlled lamp of awesome (this is the translation):

The brightness is changed by a vertical scrolling, the saturation by a horizontal scrolling and color varies with the orientation of the phone. The phone used in the video is a HTC Wildfire S Android 2.3.3. The application works with WiFi or mobile network (provided that the lamp is accessible from a public IP address)

The orientation of the phone is detected by the built-in compass (magnetic field sensor 3-axis) parameters hue, saturation and brightness are converted to RGB and then sent via a TCP connection to the Fox board that controls the lamp.


http://thenextweb.com

384945291_50677dea53_z

The smartphone is now becoming the hub for everything important in our lives. Social connections, payment systems, and banking are all controlled by our phone. Heck, you can even control your thermostat with an iPhone.

While turning your lights on and off with a computer or app might not be a new idea, one guy made something completely awesome and unique using Android. By swiping around on the app, the lamp responds to it. Also, the orientation of your phone dictates the lighting as well. Leer más “This Lamp is Controlled by an Android Phone”

Publicly Private Lives: The New Dynamic of Social Media

To post, or not to post: that is the question. Once a post, message or tweet is published, it is virtually impossible to undo. In these digital days, information becomes public in the blink of an eye. But, how much of ourselves do we really want publicly shared? As much as we’d like to think we’re in the age of ‘life as an open book’, privacy and digital surveillance are very hot topics.

eye
Take the Fourth Amendment, which protects us from unreasonable search and seizure when we have a “reasonable expectation of privacy”. However, some argue that living out our lives and communications digitally forfeits that reasonable expectation of privacy by the very nature of us putting ourselves out there in the public domain. Since we have entrusted our personal information to the various social media tools we’ve signed up for, essentially we agree that we don’t consider that personal information private – right? Oh, and since we’re also aware that surveillance exists, we expect our personal information may be tapped at any time – or do we?


by Aimee Rose
http://blog.ogilvypr.com/2011/01/publicly-private-lives-the-new-dynamic-of-social-media/#more-6385

To post, or not to post: that is the question. Once a post, message or tweet is published, it is virtually impossible to undo. In these digital days, information becomes public in the blink of an eye. But, how much of ourselves do we really want publicly shared? As much as we’d like to think we’re in the age of ‘life as an open book’, privacy and digital surveillance are very hot topics.

eye

Take the Fourth Amendment, which protects us from unreasonable search and seizure when we have a “reasonable expectation of privacy”. However, some argue that living out our lives and communications digitally forfeits that reasonable expectation of privacy by the very nature of us putting ourselves out there in the public domain. Since we have entrusted our personal information to the various social media tools we’ve signed up for, essentially we agree that we don’t consider that personal information private – right? Oh, and since we’re also aware that surveillance exists, we expect our personal information may be tapped at any time – or do we? Leer más “Publicly Private Lives: The New Dynamic of Social Media”

Links to…


5 Fundamental Steps to Deploying a Website

Something that is overlooked by a lot of web designers and developers is what is actually involved in the deployment of a website; the process when you’ve finished developing the site, tested to make sure it works, and are ready to push it to a live web server.

In a lot of cases, you will be dealing with clients who are getting their website for the first time, and there is nothing for you to really consider apart from the hosting solution to set them up on. As time goes on, you will start getting larger clients that may have existing websites already, or who have more complicated needs. You may find yourself in a scenario where the outcome could be a very unhappy client with data loss and a whole company’s worth of missing emails and site assets. Here are some basic steps that will ensure that you have covered all the bases for a smooth website deployment.
Step 1: Preparation

There are a few things to consider when you are finalizing a website, and they all depend on what type of deployment you will be completing.

The three general scenarios of a website deployment is:

1. The client has nothing (i.e. this is their first website)
2. The client already has hosting and you will be deploying the site on their server
3. The client already has hosting but you will be moving to a new server

The first scenario is the most desired because you are starting with a blank slate. Scenarios 2 and 3 are a bit trickier and involve a more thoughtful deployment process.

Once you have worked out what your deployment scenario is, you will be able to better prepare yourself for everything you need to do in order to carry out a smooth transition from the old website to the new one.

If you are dealing with scenario 1, then all you need to do is register their domain name and purchase (or provide) web hosting. Simple and fast deployment.

Scenarios 2 and 3 require some information gathering. You need domain management credentials for the existing web host so that you can manage the DNS records (more on this in a bit). You will find that, in many cases, the client has no idea what these are or where to get them, so you will need to do as much as you can before you approach your client.

So let’s gather information on our own. We can use a tool like whois.domaintools.com to find out some information about the existing domain name.


by Mark Biegel | http://sixrevisions.com/web-development/5-fundamental-steps-to-deploying-a-website/

5 Fundamental Steps to Deploying a Website

Something that is overlooked by a lot of web designers and developers is what is actually involved in the deployment of a website; the process when you’ve finished developing the site, tested to make sure it works, and are ready to push it to a live web server.

In a lot of cases, you will be dealing with clients who are getting their website for the first time, and there is nothing for you to really consider apart from the hosting solution to set them up on. As time goes on, you will start getting larger clients that may have existing websites already, or who have more complicated needs. You may find yourself in a scenario where the outcome could be a very unhappy client with data loss and a whole company’s worth of missing emails and site assets. Here are some basic steps that will ensure that you have covered all the bases for a smooth website deployment.

Step 1: Preparation

There are a few things to consider when you are finalizing a website, and they all depend on what type of deployment you will be completing.

The three general scenarios of a website deployment is:

  1. The client has nothing (i.e. this is their first website)
  2. The client already has hosting and you will be deploying the site on their server
  3. The client already has hosting but you will be moving to a new server

The first scenario is the most desired because you are starting with a blank slate. Scenarios 2 and 3 are a bit trickier and involve a more thoughtful deployment process.

Once you have worked out what your deployment scenario is, you will be able to better prepare yourself for everything you need to do in order to carry out a smooth transition from the old website to the new one.

If you are dealing with scenario 1, then all you need to do is register their domain name and purchase (or provide) web hosting. Simple and fast deployment.

Scenarios 2 and 3 require some information gathering. You need domain management credentials for the existing web host so that you can manage the DNS records (more on this in a bit). You will find that, in many cases, the client has no idea what these are or where to get them, so you will need to do as much as you can before you approach your client.

So let’s gather information on our own. We can use a tool like whois.domaintools.com to find out some information about the existing domain name. Leer más “5 Fundamental Steps to Deploying a Website”

10 Common Mistakes Made by API Providers

This post is part of our ReadWriteCloud channel, which is dedicated to covering virtualization and cloud computing. The channel is sponsored by Intel and VMware. How one services provider provides first-class service to its agency clients. Learn more in this ReadWriteWeb special report, made possible by Intel and VMware: Opus: A Marketing Agency That Gets the Most out of Virtualization.

Please Send More Birds!Twitter was one of the first to see what happened when traffic to the site came more from the API than the Web.

It now has more than 65 million tweets per day, most coming from services that use the Twitter API.

Twitter has made numerous changes to fix its API. Those experiences have taught providers what mistakes not to make when launching a service.

But there is still a lot for providers to learn.

Considering this, we asked developers and service providers to help us prepare a list of 10 common mistakes made by API providers. Hopefully, the list will provide some basic insights into what mistakes should be avoided when developing an API.

Our group of commentators include Adam DuVander executive editor at Programmable Web; Mike Pearce, a developer out of the United Kingdom who writes a lot about scrum and Agile; Mashery’s Clay Loveless and Sonoa Systems Sam Ramji.


By Alex Williams <!– –>

This post is part of our ReadWriteCloud channel, which is dedicated to covering virtualization and cloud computing. The channel is sponsored by Intel and VMware. How one services provider provides first-class service to its agency clients. Learn more in this ReadWriteWeb special report, made possible by Intel and VMware: Opus: A Marketing Agency That Gets the Most out of Virtualization.

Please Send More Birds!Twitter was one of the first to see what happened when traffic to the site came more from the API than the Web.

It now has more than 65 million tweets per day, most coming from services that use the Twitter API.

Twitter has made numerous changes to fix its API. Those experiences have taught providers what mistakes not to make when launching a service.

But there is still a lot for providers to learn.

Considering this, we asked developers and service providers to help us prepare a list of 10 common mistakes made by API providers. Hopefully, the list will provide some basic insights into what mistakes should be avoided when developing an API.

Our group of commentators include Adam DuVander executive editor at Programmable Web; Mike Pearce, a developer out of the United Kingdom who writes a lot about scrum and Agile; Mashery’s Clay Loveless and Sonoa Systems Sam Ramji. Leer más “10 Common Mistakes Made by API Providers”