Are You An Innovator? – Open Innovation at Philips – @lindegaard


by Stefan Lindegaard | facilitator and consultant focusing on open innovation | Consulting | Connecting | Promoting
Email stefanlindegaard@me.com


Join Stefan’s group on LinkedIn

That is the question Philips ask in their current open innovation challenge. Here students, entrepreneurs, and other budding inventors are encouraged to innovate around specific business challenges defined by product categories within the Consumer Lifestyle division at Philips.

Entrants are offered the chance to win a trip to Amsterdam to attend the finalist event, at which they can participate in an innovation masterclass given by Philips innovation specialists and the opportunity to present their innovation to Philips executives.

I am giving this a shout-out because my interactions over the years with Philips tell me that they are doing great things internally to develop an open innovation culture. We just don’t hear that much from Philips and I am thus glad to learn about…

Anuncios

Our Job is to Invent the Future

If we are trying to innovate, what is our actual job?

According to Mark Earls in Welcome to the Creative Age, our job is to invent the future.

Seems reasonable to me. Here is how he build that argument:

…opinions are what you get back from customers once you’ve done something, so they are largely irrelevant to you. They aren’t the precondition for customers doing something or a good guide to what you should do. At all.

So don’t waste your time with ask/answer research and opinions. Throw away the reassurance of quoting the consumer or stats garnered from opinion polls. Watch your customers, observe them, live with them, but don’t expect them to tell you much themselves. Because they can’t.

Instead, recognize:

* It is your job to invent the future – you are the inventors.
* It is not the customer’s job – they are not good at the future but they might buy your invention if you get it right (or not).


If we are trying to innovate, what is our actual job?

According to Mark Earls in Welcome to the Creative Age, our job is to invent the future.

Seems reasonable to me. Here is how he build that argument:

…opinions are what you get back from customers once you’ve done something, so they are largely irrelevant to you. They aren’t the precondition for customers doing something or a good guide to what you should do. At all.

So don’t waste your time with ask/answer research and opinions. Throw away the reassurance of quoting the consumer or stats garnered from opinion polls. Watch your customers, observe them, live with them, but don’t expect them to tell you much themselves. Because they can’t.

Instead, recognize:

No Commitment to Innovation, Quit Your Job! | 15inno


In my previous post, The Frustration of Open Innovation, Tim Kastelle added a comment that inspired me to a quick response.

Tim mentioned that he also see much frustration among people working with innovation. As I do, he also find it hard to help innovative – and frustrated – people who work in a non-innovative company.

Tim recommends that you should do as much as people can get away with – to just start experimenting within the scope of the budget and authority that they have. Tim says this often works for innovation in general, but he questions whether this would work for open innovation. He also asked a key question: Is it possible to have open innovation without top management buy-in?

In my response to Tim, I mentioned that at a recent workshop, we talked about what to do when you work in a company that is not committed to innovation. The best advice we came up with was to try to “influence back” towards your managers and executives. However, this is difficult and even if you are able to influence higher ranked people it takes a lot of time.

My other piece of advice is simple. Leave. Find another job. If you really want to make innovation happen your odds are better if you find a different company rather than staying and trying to turn things around in a place that is not committed to innovation. You can do the latter, but again: it is difficult and it takes time.

The funny thing here is that people in large corporations quickly get used to the way things work in such places. Thus they end up staying rather than pursuing better opportunities. It is amazing how fast many people get stuck for the wrong reasons.

My response to Tim’s other question is simple too. No, you can not have open innovation without top management support.

http://www.15inno.com/2010/04/04/quityourjob/

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]