7 Inspiring Interviews That Every Web Designer/Developer Should Read


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Written by:  Rean John Uehara

It’s already August and the year is about to draw to a close…how are you doing with your work and projects? I know that inspiration is quite often hard to come by, and with our line of work inspiration is mainly the driving force. To give you a boost, why not read these 7 inspiring interviews by famous bloggers, web designers, and web developers, who have garnered success in their fields?

Are you ready to be inspired?!

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7 Inspiring Interviews

Four of the interviews below actually focus on how their design blogs became a huge success. These blogs they have started simply as pet projects to teach other people about their passion: web design and web development. In the end, they managed to not only fulfill their wants, but they also managed to create entire communities for designers and developers by providing useful resources. This is one of the reasons why I once asked, Hey Web Designers and Web Developers, Are You Blogging Yet?

The following interviews will redirect to Founder Tips (except #1), 1WD’s sister website where we publish interviews and success stories of people.

Ready to be inspired? Go!

1. An Interview With Chris Coyier – Founder of CSS-Tricks Leer más “7 Inspiring Interviews That Every Web Designer/Developer Should Read”

The Need to Optimize Human Resource’s Resources | by Jesse de Agustin


by Jesse de Agustin | @emonalytics
Methodology Advisor
http://revealingengagement.com

Measuring subconscious emotional responses are not only useful when engaging a customer group but also when hiring employees. Traditional personality surveys, behavioral questioning, both in discussion and survey formats, and computerized software give limited applicant insight. Applicant tracking systems are powerful tools; yet especially with organization’s increasing emphasis on ensuring culture fit, the face to face interview is critical – because this is where emotion – both conscious and subconscious are center stage. Interviewers might be aware of  how to ‘read’ generalities of body language, but the advice is often incorrect.  For instance, just become someone looks down, doesn’t mean they’re hiding something.

The typical human resources practices are in need of optimization in terms of how they’re targeted at understanding actual human behavior.

Optimizing Human Resource’s Resources

Personality tests are often used in the hiring process, and are typically administered online. They attempt to delve into specific traits that apply to applicant’s behavior at work, and interpersonal behavior. [1] While these tests can be useful for jobs where teamwork is important, applicants can also easily “fake” responses based upon social norms, or what they believe the employer is “looking for.” Moreover, an eye tracking study shows that all ‘dimensions of personality were fakeable.’ Leer más “The Need to Optimize Human Resource’s Resources | by Jesse de Agustin”

Get better data from user studies: 16 interviewing tips

One of my favorite parts of my job is interviewing a huge variety of people about their habits, needs, attitudes, and reactions to designs. I like the challenge of quickly getting strangers to talk freely and frankly about themselves, and to try figuring out new designs and products in front of me. User research shouldn’t be like the boring market surveys they read from clipboards in the mall. Great research interviews should be like listening to Terry Gross on Fresh Air — engaging and insightful. That’s what I aim for. Here are some tips and techniques that have helped me get the most out of user interviews.


Photo by pasukaru76

One of my favorite parts of my job is interviewing a huge variety of people about their habits, needs, attitudes, and reactions to designs. I like the challenge of quickly getting strangers to talk freely and frankly about themselves, and to try figuring out new designs and products in front of me. User research shouldn’t be like the boring market surveys they read from clipboards in the mall. Great research interviews should be like listening to Terry Gross on Fresh Air — engaging and insightful. That’s what I aim for. Here are some tips and techniques that have helped me get the most out of user interviews.

1. Get into character >>> Leer más “Get better data from user studies: 16 interviewing tips”

10 Crazy Job Interview Mistakes People Actually Made

· On the way to the interview, the candidate passed, cut off and flipped his middle finger at a driver who happened to be the interviewer.

· The candidate took off his shoes during the interview.

· The candidate asked for a sip of the interviewer’s coffee.

· When a candidate interviewing for a security position wasn’t hired on the spot, he painted graffiti on the building.

· Candidate was arrested by federal authorities during the interview when the background check revealed the person had an outstanding warrant.

· Candidate told the interviewer she wasn’t sure if the job offered was worth “starting the car for.”

“It may seem unlikely that candidates would ever answer a cellphone during an interview, or wear shorts, but when we talk to hiring managers, we remarkably hear these stories all of the time,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder.

Lucky for interviewers, she notes that standing out from the crowd – in a good way – is typically a bigger issue for most job-seekers than avoiding a big mistake…


job interviewBy:  Chad Brooks, BusinessNewsDaily Contributor
http://www.businessnewsdaily.com

·         The candidate put the interviewer on hold during a phone interview. When she came back on the line, she told the interviewer she had a date set up for Friday.

·         The candidate wore a Boy Scout uniform and never told interviewers why.

·         The candidate talked about promptness as one of her strengths after showing up 10 minutes late.

·         On the way to the interview, the candidate passed, cut off and flipped his middle finger at a driver who happened to be the interviewer.

·         The candidate took off his shoes during the interview.

·         The candidate asked for a sip of the interviewer’s coffee.

·          When a candidate interviewing for a security position wasn’t hired on the spot, he painted graffiti on the building.

·         Candidate was arrested by federal authorities during the interview when the background check revealed the person had an outstanding warrant.

·         Candidate told the interviewer she wasn’t sure if the job offered was worth “starting the car for.”

“It may seem unlikely that candidates would ever answer a cellphone during an interview, or wear shorts, but when we talk to hiring managers, we remarkably hear these stories all of the time,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder.

Lucky for interviewers, she notes that standing out from the crowd – in a good way – is typically a bigger issue for most job-seekers than avoiding a big mistake… Leer más “10 Crazy Job Interview Mistakes People Actually Made”

The Interview Prep Cheat Sheet: What Hiring Managers Really Want To Know

Your power of influence to get things accomplished. Many organizations have done away with a traditional business hierarchy for ever-mutating project teams and a flat organization design. Therefore, the skill of persuasion is as important as ever.

Your drive and initiative. It’s the 99% perspiration factor: the ability to come up with ideas and work and work to execute them. What are the things you’ve done in that prove you’ve got energy and vision?

Be sure to articulate your experiences through clear examples. In preparing for an interview, take an inventory of the things you’ve accomplished and be able to discuss them in detail. The story of your career is marked by signposts, subplots that demonstrate something about you.

Try not to talk about what you would do if given the opportunity. Talk about the stuff you’ve already done. That’s what really demonstrates what you’re all about.


http://the99percent.com 
by Scott McDowell

Illustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco

Part of my work as a consultant to creative organizations is what’s known as “executive search” (I prefer “executive find” myself – not that either phrase sounds very sexy). Companies hire me to go out and locate a leader who can help push their ideas out into the world. Among other things, this job involves interviewing… lots and lots of interviewing. So what have I learned in all these interrogations?Despite the fact that people switch jobs more than ever these days, the interview is still somewhat of a specter. It’s a lot of pressure to represent yourself over the course of an hour or two and be judged one way or the other.

Don’t sweat it. You can greatly enhance your chances of getting to round 2 (or 3) by understanding what the hiring manager is really looking for. (Hint: it’s usually not your technical kung fu.) While the skills and experience of any job can vary to extremes, what the person hiring needs right now is confidence in you. Leer más “The Interview Prep Cheat Sheet: What Hiring Managers Really Want To Know”

Prepping Candidates and Taming Hiring Managers

Most candidates — even high-level executives — need to be prepped before the interview. The reason for this is obvious: they all think they’re great interviewees. Most aren’t. Making matters worse, the hiring managers they’ll be meeting think they’re endowed with some special instinct that allows them to accurately assess candidate competency. Most aren’t.

Since I don’t like to present great candidates who get inadvertently excluded for dumb reasons, I need to prep both my hiring manager clients and my candidates to increase the likelihood the candidates are appropriately and accurately evaluated. This way I don’t have to do searches over again and rely on luck to make placements.

To be taken seriously on this point I had to write a book: Hire With Your Head. Basically it describes a process on how to get hiring managers and candidates on the same page. From the hiring manager’s perspective, it’s describing the work as a series of performance objectives required for on-the-job success. (I refer to these as performance profiles.) From the candidate’s perspective, it’s having them describe a comparable accomplishment for each performance objective. For example, let’s assume the job required the new product marketing manager to develop and launch 25 new iPad apps over the course of the next year. During the interview you’d ask the candidate to describe in detail some comparable product-marketing-related accomplishment. I suggest spending 10-15 minutes getting lots of details for each accomplishment. (Here’s my one-question interview article I wrote for ERE in 2001 on how to do this.) These performance objectives can be split among the hiring team; then, during the collective debrief, the team can rank the candidate on how well the accomplishments compare.

At least that’s the theory. In the field other things happen to mess up this plan.


Photograph taken during the California rodeo, Salinas, 2006 edition Copyright © 2006 David MonniauxMost candidates — even high-level executives — need to be prepped before the interview. The reason for this is obvious: they all think they’re great interviewees. Most aren’t. Making matters worse, the hiring managers they’ll be meeting think they’re endowed with some special instinct that allows them to accurately assess candidate competency. Most aren’t.

Since I don’t like to present great candidates who get inadvertently excluded for dumb reasons, I need to prep both my hiring manager clients and my candidates to increase the likelihood the candidates are appropriately and accurately evaluated. This way I don’t have to do searches over again and rely on luck to make placements.

To be taken seriously on this point I had to write a book: Hire With Your Head. Basically it describes a process on how to get hiring managers and candidates on the same page. From the hiring manager’s perspective, it’s describing the work as a series of performance objectives required for on-the-job success. (I refer to these as performance profiles.) From the candidate’s perspective, it’s having them describe a comparable accomplishment for each performance objective. For example, let’s assume the job required the new product marketing manager to develop and launch 25 new iPad apps over the course of the next year. During the interview you’d ask the candidate to describe in detail some comparable product-marketing-related accomplishment. I suggest spending 10-15 minutes getting lots of details for each accomplishment. (Here’s my one-question interview article I wrote for ERE in 2001 on how to do this.) These performance objectives can be split among the hiring team; then, during the collective debrief, the team can rank the candidate on how well the accomplishments compare.

At least that’s the theory. In the field other things happen to mess up this plan. Leer más “Prepping Candidates and Taming Hiring Managers”

10 Post-Interview Reflections

After an interview, it’s important to take a lot of deep cleansing breaths and reflect about the “process.” If you’ve been at a job search for a while, really excited about this particular position or just aren’t sure how to gauge your performance, use these questions as a guide. More importantly, use your answers to become the better, smarter candidate:

1. Did you feel comfortable during the interview?
2. Which questions could you have answered better?
3. Where were you successful? And not so much?
4. Were there awkward silences?
5. Were you able to demonstrate your understanding of the organization?
6. How was your conversational style?
7. Did the interviewer ask questions that you couldn’t answer?
8. Did the interviewer have any concerns about your work history, candidacy or skills?
9. Were you able to ask questions at the end about the organization or position? If so, were the answers helpful?
10. Would you do anything differently next time? Or say something different?


After an interview, it’s important to take a lot of deep cleansing breaths and reflect about the “process.”  If you’ve been at a job search for a while, really excited about this particular position or just aren’t sure how to gauge your performance, use these questions as a guide. More importantly, use your answers to become the better, smarter candidate:

  1. Did you feel comfortable during the interview?
  2. Which questions could you have answered better?
  3. Where were you successful?  And not so much?
  4. Were there awkward silences?
  5. Were you able to demonstrate your understanding of the organization?
  6. How was your conversational style?
  7. Did the interviewer ask questions that you couldn’t answer?
  8. Did the interviewer have any concerns about your work history, candidacy or skills?
  9. Were you able to ask questions at the end about the organization or position? If so, were the answers helpful?
  10. Would you do anything differently next time? Or say something different? Leer más “10 Post-Interview Reflections”