Locate all the Big Emails in your Gmail Account

Gmail doesn’t offer a way to search and sort email messages by size but you can use a tool like Microsoft Outlook or IMAP Size to sort your mails by the size criteria on the desktop. They connect to your Gmail account via IMAP and therefore when you delete an emails with big attachments locally, the same happens in your online inbox as well.

If you however find the above workarounds a little complicated, there’s an even simpler method now that won’t even require you download or install anything – it’s called findbigmail.com.

It will quickly find all the big email messages in your Gmail account that are taking up the maximum space. These messages are categorized with special labels like “Big Mail” or “Really Big Mail” to help you decide which of them should be removed to recover more space.


http://www.labnol.org/internet/locate-big-emails-in-gmail/17937/

What would you do if your Gmail Inbox is reaching its storage limit and you urgently need to free up some space else all your incoming email messages will be returned to the sender?

You’ll either have to buy some extra storage space from Google or another solution is that you find all the emails in your Inbox that have really big attachments and put them into the trash.

gmail messages sorted by size

Sorting your Gmail Messages by Size

Gmail doesn’t offer a way to search and sort email messages by size but you can use a tool like Microsoft Outlook or IMAP Size to sort your mails by the size criteria on the desktop. They connect to your Gmail account via IMAP and therefore when you delete an emails with big attachments locally, the same happens in your online inbox as well.

If you however find the above workarounds a little complicated, there’s an even simpler method now that won’t even require you download or install anything – it’s called findbigmail.com.

It will quickly find all the big email messages in your Gmail account that are taking up the maximum space. These messages are categorized with special labels like “Big Mail” or “Really Big Mail” to help you decide which of them should be removed to recover more space. Leer más “Locate all the Big Emails in your Gmail Account”

Sparrow for Mac: a study in minimalist e-mail interfaces

Mac OS X users are about to have a new option for a native Cocoa e-mail client—as long as they use the IMAP protocol and prefer a very spartan user interface. Called Sparrow, the app’s developers recently launched a public beta to get some feedback on the features and design. With over 20,000 downloads in just one day, the developers are scrambling to massage the beta into a 1.0 release and answer the massive flood of user feedback.

We spoke with Dominique Leca and Dihn Viêt Hoà about their motivation to create a Mac OS X e-mail client, fueled by innovative iPad apps and frustration with vaporware projects. We also spent a little time with the beta of Sparrow to check out its Twitter-influenced user interface.
DIY Project

Leca cofounded an iOS development studio in Paris two years ago and hired Dinh, a former Apple software engineer, to code for the company. Two years later, both left to pursue other opportunities and decided to collaborate on Sparrow as a side project. Neither were prepared for the project to be so popular.

“We were amazed by the way Sparrow was received, and we weren’t imagining that it could make so much noise,” Leca told Ars. “We’re gearing up to make a final 1.0 version of Sparrow, thanks to the amazing feedback we have had.”

When he was at Apple, Dinh had worked on iCal and later iSync. He was also heavily involved in the development of the open source e-mail library libEtPan.

That library was used to build an open source Cocoa wrapper called MailCore, designed to be the basis of a Mac OS X IMAP client called Kiwi. Unfortunately, Kiwi has yet to materialize as an actual software product. However, both etPan and MailCore have been used in other Mac and iPhone e-mail clients, such as reMail and Notify. In fact, MailCore was considered as an option for another e-mail client project that was launched earlier this year called Letters.

Dinh had followed the early initial rush of work on Letters, but wasn’t happy with the choice of MailCore. He felt that as the main developer of etPan he could make a better library, which he calls etPanKit, and planned to offer its use to the Letters project.

However, Dinh’s offer was ultimately turned down. “First, it was decided not to integrate this new engine and to write a new IMAP engine from scratch,” he told Ars. “Secondly, Letters was going nowhere.” Ars confirmed that little progress has been made since the initial flurry of discussions got the Letters project off the ground in January.

With etPanKit in hand, and Leca offering to work on UI design and marketing (he has a business degree from French business school HEC), the pair decided to make their own IMAP e-mail client. And they forged ahead “against most advice of Mac developers around us,” Leca said.

“We kid a lot about it, but the Mac needs a great, alternative e-mail client, and in our coding fantasies we always talk about making the perfect one,” Panic’s Cabel Sasser told Ars back when Letters had just been announced. “What holds us back are only dumb, boring business things: it would take a lot of work, and we’re not sure the return would be worth it.”

The problem most developers fear is competing with Apple and “free”—Mail is already an adequate e-mail client for most users, and it comes free with every Mac.


Mac OS X users are about to have a new option for a native Cocoa e-mail client—as long as they use the IMAP protocol and prefer a very spartan user interface. Called Sparrow, the app’s developers recently launched a public beta to get some feedback on the features and design. With over 20,000 downloads in just one day, the developers are scrambling to massage the beta into a 1.0 release and answer the massive flood of user feedback.

We spoke with Dominique Leca and Dihn Viêt Hoà about their motivation to create a Mac OS X e-mail client, fueled by innovative iPad apps and frustration with vaporware projects. We also spent a little time with the beta of Sparrow to check out its Twitter-influenced user interface.

DIY Project

Leca cofounded an iOS development studio in Paris two years ago and hired Dinh, a former Apple software engineer, to code for the company. Two years later, both left to pursue other opportunities and decided to collaborate on Sparrow as a side project. Neither were prepared for the project to be so popular.

“We were amazed by the way Sparrow was received, and we weren’t imagining that it could make so much noise,” Leca told Ars. “We’re gearing up to make a final 1.0 version of Sparrow, thanks to the amazing feedback we have had.”

When he was at Apple, Dinh had worked on iCal and later iSync. He was also heavily involved in the development of the open source e-mail library libEtPan.

That library was used to build an open source Cocoa wrapper called MailCore, designed to be the basis of a Mac OS X IMAP client called Kiwi. Unfortunately, Kiwi has yet to materialize as an actual software product. However, both etPan and MailCore have been used in other Mac and iPhone e-mail clients, such as reMail and Notify. In fact, MailCore was considered as an option for another e-mail client project that was launched earlier this year called Letters.

Dinh had followed the early initial rush of work on Letters, but wasn’t happy with the choice of MailCore. He felt that as the main developer of etPan he could make a better library, which he calls etPanKit, and planned to offer its use to the Letters project.

However, Dinh’s offer was ultimately turned down. “First, it was decided not to integrate this new engine and to write a new IMAP engine from scratch,” he told Ars. “Secondly, Letters was going nowhere.” Ars confirmed that little progress has been made since the initial flurry of discussions got the Letters project off the ground in January.

With etPanKit in hand, and Leca offering to work on UI design and marketing (he has a business degree from French business school HEC), the pair decided to make their own IMAP e-mail client. And they forged ahead “against most advice of Mac developers around us,” Leca said.

“We kid a lot about it, but the Mac needs a great, alternative e-mail client, and in our coding fantasies we always talk about making the perfect one,” Panic’s Cabel Sasser told Ars back when Letters had just been announced. “What holds us back are only dumb, boring business things: it would take a lot of work, and we’re not sure the return would be worth it.”

The problem most developers fear is competing with Apple and “free”—Mail is already an adequate e-mail client for most users, and it comes free with every Mac. Leer más “Sparrow for Mac: a study in minimalist e-mail interfaces”

Sparrow for Mac Simplifies Gmail for the Better

Quick Pitch: Sparrow is a minimalist mail application for Mac. It was designed to keep things simple and efficient. No fancy stuff here — just your mail and nothing else.

Genius Idea: E-mail has become such a large part of our lives that everyone from Google (Google) to individual developers are looking to build the best solution for faster, better e-mail management. Yet all of the bright new features sometimes make our e-mail inboxes more complex (and sometimes slower) than ever. But not Sparrow.

The free Mac desktop client for Gmail (Gmail) approaches e-mail with Tweetie (tweetie)-like finesse and simplicity. If anything, Sparrow feels like a mobile e-mail client optimized for your desktop, which means it eliminates the chaff to focus on the wheat: exchanging e-mail.


Jennifer Van Grove
Jennifer Van Grove
http://mashable.com/2010/10/08/sparrow/

Name: Sparrow

Quick Pitch: Sparrow is a minimalist mail application for Mac. It was designed to keep things simple and efficient. No fancy stuff here — just your mail and nothing else.

Genius Idea: E-mail has become such a large part of our lives that everyone from Google (Google) to individual developers are looking to build the best solution for faster, better e-mail management. Yet all of the bright new features sometimes make our e-mail inboxes more complex (and sometimes slower) than ever. But not Sparrow.

The free Mac desktop client for Gmail (Gmail) approaches e-mail with Tweetie (tweetie)-like finesse and simplicity. If anything, Sparrow feels like a mobile e-mail client optimized for your desktop, which means it eliminates the chaff to focus on the wheat: exchanging e-mail. Leer más “Sparrow for Mac Simplifies Gmail for the Better”

Busting Your Performance Bottlenecks at Work

As a boss, I sometimes have to listen to a member of my team explain why something went horribly wrong. As as a business owner, I also have to ease the concerns of clients who have been burned by vendors in the past. And as a human being, I hate being on the hot seat myself. Worrying about things that could go wrong on a project can seize your brain. Just as Steven Covey counsels professionals to get task lists out of their heads and on paper, I’m finding my head has more room for creativity if I know that I’ve got a “Plan B” for any situation.

Project managers and engineers call this technique “eliminating single points of failure.” Simply put, if your routine or your process relies too heavily on one particular tool, technology, or person, something as simple as a rogue squirrel can ruin your week. (I’ll explain that in a bit.) Before you think I’m obsessed with failure, let me show you seven ways I’ve eliminated the single points of failure that become performance bottlenecks in my work routines, along with some strategies I coach my teams to use when we’re working together.


Busting Your Performance Bottlenecks at Work

As a boss, I sometimes have to listen to a member of my team explain why something went horribly wrong. As as a business owner, I also have to ease the concerns of clients who have been burned by vendors in the past. And as a human being, I hate being on the hot seat myself. Worrying about things that could go wrong on a project can seize your brain. Just as Steven Covey counsels professionals to get task lists out of their heads and on paper, I’m finding my head has more room for creativity if I know that I’ve got a “Plan B” for any situation.

Project managers and engineers call this technique “eliminating single points of failure.” Simply put, if your routine or your process relies too heavily on one particular tool, technology, or person, something as simple as a rogue squirrel can ruin your week. (I’ll explain that in a bit.) Before you think I’m obsessed with failure, let me show you seven ways I’ve eliminated the single points of failure that become performance bottlenecks in my work routines, along with some strategies I coach my teams to use when we’re working together. Leer más “Busting Your Performance Bottlenecks at Work”

Gmail implementa acceso OAuth para IMAP/SMTP | dolcebita


Google ha anunciado que incorporará en breve el protocolo OAuth en su servicio Gmail a través de IMAP y SMTP, ofreciendo una forma segura y fácil de que las aplicaciones externas puedan acceder a nuestra información del correo electrónico sin tener que facilitarles nuestra contraseña.

El protocolo OAuth nos permitirá autorizar a otras páginas web el acceso a nuestros datos de correo y hacer uso de esa información sin necesidad de que almacenen nuestra contraseña, simplemente tendremos que tener la sesión iniciada en Gmail. Uno de los ejemplos más común es permitir que una red social pueda acceder a tu libreta de direcciones para enviar invitaciones a tus amigos.

Esta implementación ya está disponible en muchos de los servicios que ofrece Google y con este nuevo paso aplicaciones no desarrolladas por Google podrán realizar operaciones en tu cuenta de correo de una forma más segura. Este es el caso por ejemplo de Syphir, una aplicación para el iPhone que realiza notificaciones cada vez que recibes un correo y puede realizar acciones para organizar tu bandeja de entrada.

syphir Gmail implementa acceso OAuth para IMAP/SMTP

Este protocolo de validación ya está en funcionamiento en varios servicios web como Twitter.

http://www.dolcebita.com/2010/03/gmail-implementa-acceso-oauth-para-imapsmtp/

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