Samsung Social Media Manager Explains the Social In Their New Website [Interview]

This is a guest post by Ekaterina Walter, a Social Media Strategist with Intel Corporation.

Samsung has just launched their new, fully redesigned Consumer Website. I immediately gravitated to the clean, customer-centric look and new social functionalities right there on the home page, and wanted to learn a bit more about how they achieved it. To do that, I interviewed Esteban Contreras, Social Media Manager at Samsung to find out company’s motivations and a little bit more about this project.

“Instead of linking out,” says Esteban “we wanted to bring the conversations and the word of mouth to our site.”

You can find everything right on the home page: conversations (you can ask and answer questions on twitter), Facebook integrations (you can see the most liked products and articles), photos uploaded by customers, video created by Samsung, reviews are brought to life and filtered by the most helpful, and buzz from all over the web about the company and their products.

Ekaterina: What are the main goals of the new Samsung homepage?

Esteban: One of our goals was to drive greater engagement and satisfaction by being more customer-centric and socially relevant. The new Samsung homepage enhances the brand experience by making it more about people, especially our customers. It also provides a more seamless, authentic, and even human brand experience, that is driven much more on consumer participation than on simply showcasing products. It also makes it easier and fun for people to find what they’re looking for, while providing opportunities to engage with us and with each other.

Another major goal was to keep pace with the speed of changes in digital technology & consumer expectations. Our new homepage, and our entire new web site, is in many ways a celebration of a strengthened connection between us and them, and the two-way conversations that have only just begun.

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This is a guest post by Ekaterina Walter, a Social Media Strategist with Intel Corporation.

Samsung has just launched their new, fully redesigned Consumer Website. I immediately gravitated to the clean, customer-centric look and new social functionalities right there on the home page, and wanted to learn a bit more about how they achieved it.  To do that, I interviewed Esteban Contreras, Social Media Manager at Samsung to find out company’s motivations and a little bit more about this project.

“Instead of linking out,” says Esteban “we wanted to bring the conversations and the word of mouth to our site.”

You can find everything right on the home page: conversations (you can ask and answer questions on twitter), Facebook integrations (you can see the most liked products and articles), photos uploaded by customers, video created by Samsung, reviews are brought to life and filtered by the most helpful, and buzz from all over the web about the company and their products.

Ekaterina: What are the main goals of the new Samsung homepage?

Esteban: One of our goals was to drive greater engagement and satisfaction by being more customer-centric and socially relevant. The new Samsung homepage enhances the brand experience by making it more about people, especially our customers. It also provides a more seamless, authentic, and even human brand experience, that is driven much more on consumer participation than on simply showcasing products. It also makes it easier and fun for people to find what they’re looking for, while providing opportunities to engage with us and with each other.

Another major goal was to keep pace with the speed of changes in digital technology & consumer expectations. Our new homepage, and our entire new web site, is in many ways a celebration of a strengthened connection between us and them, and the two-way conversations that have only just begun. Leer más “Samsung Social Media Manager Explains the Social In Their New Website [Interview]”

Intel Wants to Be Inside Everything

Chips that act as the brains of electronic devices other than computers or mobile phones are known as embedded processors and represent a $10 billion market, according to Intel Chief Executive Paul Otellini. That’s small compared with the $34.5 billion market for PC processors. Intel will have $43 billion in revenues this year, according to analysts in a Bloomberg survey. Of that, only about $1 billion comes from embedded products, says the company. Still, Atom sales are growing fast, and the company is counting on the chip to help break its dependence on the slowing PC market. “There’s a limit to where their core business will take them,” says Alex Vallecillo, a fund manager at PNC Capital Advisors.

Although Atom chips aren’t as powerful as the ones that run PCs, they’re much cheaper, which makes them economical for powering all kinds of devices. Nautilus puts Atom chips into its treadmills to stream Internet video onto built-in displays and upload the times and distances from workouts, Intel Vice-President Doug Davis says. Digital advertising signage is another growth market for Intel, says Alex Gauna, an analyst at JMP Securities in San Francisco. LG Electronics is using Atom chips in signs that will recognize the age, gender, and other characteristics of passersby and change the advertising pitch accordingly—similar to electronic billboards in the 2002 Steven Spielberg science fiction film Minority Report. Since Atoms also use little power and don’t require bulky batteries to run, they’re popping up in unexpected parts of the world. In India, banks are using them in handheld terminals that serve rural areas off the electricity grid. Once a month or so, an itinerant teller visits a village, giving locals access to loans and other banking services.


Image representing Intel as depicted in CrunchBase

Intel is counting on its Atom embedded processors to help break its dependence on the slowing PC market

By Ian King

Two years ago, Intel (INTC) held a contest for college students, asking them to come up with new uses for the company’s Atom processor. One proposal: a shower that regulates water temperature and plays music from the Internet. While Intel doesn’t plan to enter the shower market, it is putting its chips into gas pumps, cars, musical instruments, and other devices where few processors have gone before. Leer más “Intel Wants to Be Inside Everything”

Intel, McAfee y la internet de las cosas

La reciente adquisición de McAfee por parte de Intel tiene una lectura muy interesante cuando vemos las notas de prensa que se han publicado sobre ella, y es la derivación del tema hacia la inminente popularización de ese concepto del que llevamos tanto tiempo oyendo hablar: la llamada “internet de las cosas“.

McAfee es una empresa que me evoca recuerdos de los orígenes de la red, muy anteriores a la popularización de Internet: el fichero que más habitualmente nos bajábamos de las BBS a principios de los ‘90 eran las primeras versiones de su antivirus, al principio Viruscan, después la combinación Scan y Clean… eran programas fundamentales en una escuela de negocios con laboratorios dados a la circulación promiscua de ficheros entre cientos de alumnos. Y John McAfee ya estaba allí.


La reciente adquisición de McAfee por parte de Intel tiene una lectura muy interesante cuando vemos las notas de prensa que se han publicado sobre ella, y es la derivación del tema hacia la inminente popularización de ese concepto del que llevamos tanto tiempo oyendo hablar: la llamada “internet de las cosas“.

McAfee es una empresa que me evoca recuerdos de los orígenes de la red, muy anteriores a la popularización de Internet: el fichero que más habitualmente nos bajábamos de las BBS a principios de los ‘90 eran las primeras versiones de su antivirus, al principio Viruscan, después la combinación Scan y Clean… eran programas fundamentales en una escuela de negocios con laboratorios dados a la circulación promiscua de ficheros entre cientos de alumnos. Y John McAfee ya estaba allí. Leer más “Intel, McAfee y la internet de las cosas”

Intel compra a McAfee por 7680 millones de dólares

La mayor empresa fabricante de procesadores , Intel anunció una operación de compra de McAfee por la suma de 7,680 millones de dólares.

Intel compra a la firma de antivirus McAfee por 7680 mdd

Con esto busca implementar una mayor integración entre procesadores y software, con lo cual esperan incrementar la seguridad , sobre todo en dispositivos móviles, los cuales hasta ahora no han considerado el tema de la seguridad tan seriamente. También veremos una mejor integración entre chips y software.

Los miembros de las mesas directivas de ambas compañías han acordado la aprobación, sin embargo especificaron que sólo se espera la anuencia de los accionistas para completar la transacción, la cual al momento no tiene fecha para la aprobación de la operación de compra.

De concretarse la fusión, Intel podría tomar ventaja en cuanto a seguridad, debido a que especializaría su software AV para trabajar con sus procesadores. Lo cual dejaría a su más cercano competidor, Symantec y su AV Norton, en una posición de desventaja.


Autor: Misael Aguilar

La mayor empresa fabricante de procesadores , Intel anunció una operación de compra de McAfee por la suma de 7,680 millones de dólares.

Intel compra a la firma de antivirus McAfee por 7680 mdd

Con esto busca implementar una mayor integración entre procesadores y software, con lo cual esperan incrementar la seguridad , sobre todo en dispositivos móviles, los cuales hasta ahora no han considerado el tema de la seguridad tan seriamente. También veremos una mejor integración entre chips y software.

Los miembros de las mesas directivas de ambas compañías han acordado la aprobación, sin embargo especificaron que sólo se espera la anuencia de los accionistas para completar la transacción, la cual al momento no tiene fecha para la aprobación de la operación de compra.

De concretarse la fusión, Intel podría tomar ventaja en cuanto a seguridad, debido a que especializaría su software AV para trabajar con sus procesadores. Lo cual dejaría a su más cercano competidor, Symantec y su AV Norton, en una posición de desventaja. Leer más “Intel compra a McAfee por 7680 millones de dólares”

INTEL / SUPERSTARS

Intel’s latest campaign, ‘Superstars’ puts the focus on undiscovered musicians who need a helping hand to live the superstar lifestyle. The brand has created a Facebook based campaign where artists can upload their tracks and users can vote for their favourite. The winner in each category will receive USD$10,000 in cash to further their careers.
Intel partnered with Cakewalk, creators of simple solutions for music production and Ourstage.com, a new music discovery site. The competition is segmented into six genres Rock, Pop, Country, Singer-Songwriter, Urban, and Latin. The contest launched with the first three categories on July 1 and since then they have received over 2,000 entries. The winner for stage one will be announced at the end of August, with stage two of the competition launching in September.


intelss_02.jpg

Intel‘s latest campaign, ‘Superstars‘ puts the focus on undiscovered musicians who need a helping hand to live the superstar lifestyle. The brand has created a Facebook based campaign where artists can upload their tracks and users can vote for their favourite. The winner in each category will receive USD$10,000 in cash to further their careers.
Intel partnered with Cakewalk, creators of simple solutions for music production and Ourstage.com, a new music discovery site. The competition is segmented into six genres Rock, Pop, Country, Singer-Songwriter, Urban, and Latin. The contest launched with the first three categories on July 1 and since then they have received over 2,000 entries. The winner for stage one will be announced at the end of August, with stage two of the competition launching in September. Leer más “INTEL / SUPERSTARS”

Using Light, Intel Confirms Data Will Be Sent Wayyy Faster in the Near Future

Intel announced a prototype technology today capable of moving data at 50 Gbps, comparable to sending an entire HD movie in one second – foreshadowing faster, longer data connections that could be revolutionary for consumers and data center users.

The prototype represents an important advance in Intel’s research into silicon photonics – using lasers instead of electrons to send data – which the company has been working on for years. Intel hopes to scale up the technology until it reaches speeds close to a terabit per second – fast enough to transfer a copy of the entire contents of a typical laptop in one second, the company said.

Data transmission speeds over wire-based connections are limited by bandwidth and distance. Intel turned to silicon-based photonic devices in order to transcend these physical limitations and continue to make more powerful chips.

With the new process, electrical signals are translated into light at different-colored wavelengths, which are combined and travel down a single fiber. Then the light is separated back into wavelengths and converted back to electrons. The speeds are so high that processors, memory and other computer components will no longer need to be placed inches from each other, implying vastly different computer designs in the future, the company said.


Intel announced a prototype technology today capable of moving data at 50 Gbps, comparable to sending an entire HD movie in one second – foreshadowing faster, longer data connections that could be revolutionary for consumers and data center users.

The prototype represents an important advance in Intel’s research into silicon photonics – using lasers instead of electrons to send data – which the company has been working on for years. Intel hopes to scale up the technology until it reaches speeds close to a terabit per second – fast enough to transfer a copy of the entire contents of a typical laptop in one second, the company said.

Data transmission speeds over wire-based connections are limited by bandwidth and distance. Intel turned to silicon-based photonic devices in order to transcend these physical limitations and continue to make more powerful chips.

With the new process, electrical signals are translated into light at different-colored wavelengths, which are combined and travel down a single fiber. Then the light is separated back into wavelengths and converted back to electrons. The speeds are so high that processors, memory and other computer components will no longer need to be placed inches from each other, implying vastly different computer designs in the future, the company said. Leer más “Using Light, Intel Confirms Data Will Be Sent Wayyy Faster in the Near Future”

Nokia Declines to Go All In on Chips

One might think Nokia would give into the temptation.

It sees Apple vacuuming up adoration and profits. It sees Apple taking more control of the components that go into a phone. In particular, Apple has worked on building its very own chip for smartphones and tablets and has acquired chip companies apace.

Henry Tirri, the head of Nokia’s research centers, said that building a homemade chip was too risky.

Perhaps Nokia too should be harboring silicon dreams. But Henry Tirri, the head of Nokia’s research centers, says it is not interested.

“You can do for a while an investment like Apple is doing on their own processor stack and aim for very optimized performance,” Mr. Tirri said during an interview at the company’s Silicon Valley lab. “But that is very brittle.”

That would be Nokia passing on the prospect of a homemade chip as one means of invigorating its cellphone lineup.

Mr. Tirri has worked in the computer science field for about 40 years and dresses the part of a Silicon Valley local. Sparkly earring, hair tumbling down his temples, a white embroidered shirt, cream pants and sandals scream anything but “icy Finn.”

He knows the chip industry’s patterns well and has seen specialists capitalize on their wares for short periods of time, only to be undone in spectacular fashion when more general-purpose products come to town.

“It seems to be that Moore’s Law will always end up leaning toward commoditization and a faster, general-purpose chip,” Mr. Tirri said.


Image representing Nokia as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

By ASHLEE VANCE

One might think Nokia would give into the temptation.

It sees Apple vacuuming up adoration and profits. It sees Apple taking more control of the components that go into a phone. In particular, Apple has worked on building its very own chip for smartphones and tablets and has acquired chip companies apace.

Henry Tirri, the head of Nokia’s research centers, said that building a homemade chip was too risky.

Perhaps Nokia too should be harboring silicon dreams. But Henry Tirri, the head of Nokia’s research centers, says it is not interested.

“You can do for a while an investment like Apple is doing on their own processor stack and aim for very optimized performance,” Mr. Tirri said during an interview at the company’s Silicon Valley lab. “But that is very brittle.”

That would be Nokia passing on the prospect of a homemade chip as one means of invigorating its cellphone lineup.

Mr. Tirri has worked in the computer science field for about 40 years and dresses the part of a Silicon Valley local. Sparkly earring, hair tumbling down his temples, a white embroidered shirt, cream pants and sandals scream anything but “icy Finn.”

He knows the chip industry’s patterns well and has seen specialists capitalize on their wares for short periods of time, only to be undone in spectacular fashion when more general-purpose products come to town.

“It seems to be that Moore’s Law will always end up leaning toward commoditization and a faster, general-purpose chip,” Mr. Tirri said.

Nokia could use a shot in the arm, but finding that boost through a homemade chip is just too risky. Any manufacturing miss or misstep on features needed in a given generation of products can leave you waiting two or three years to catch up.

“You have to be very good at predicting things or you can kill yourself in one cycle,” Mr. Tirri said. Leer más “Nokia Declines to Go All In on Chips”