The Market that Needs a Market Maker

Do you wonder why there were an average of 8 million jobs posted online in the U.S. every month of last year, while 13 million people continued to search for work during the exact same months? The reason is that the U.S. — along with just about every other country — is suffering from a talent mismatch: employers cannot find individuals with the skills and capabilities they need, where and when they need them. The problem is not just one of location and timing, however. There is no mechanism that reliably signals which skills employers need so that individuals and schools can develop those skills. In other words, the relationship between supply and demand is tenuous at best. The job market simply doesn’t function the way a market should.

Experts have examined the problem from every angle and concluded that, if left unresolved, the skills mismatch will continue to eat away at U.S. competiveness. Research by the McKinsey Global Institute predictsthat by 2020, the U.S. will need to create 21 million new jobs to return to full employment but, should present trends continue, there will be 1.5 million too few college graduates to meet demand and that 5.9 million people will not have the education employers require and will therefore be unemployable. That’s why at ManpowerGroup we believe that investment ought to focus on youth, who are now entering the market and who most need training. Building their skills will help unleash their potential and start to close the widening gap. Still, while I cannot overstate the importance of training, it alone will not solve the labor market’s structural dysfunction.

Anuncios

Tammy Johns

http://blogs.hbr.org
TAMMY JOHNS
Tammy Johns is a senior vice president at ManpowerGroup, in charge of the company’s innovation and workforce solutions.

Do you wonder why there were an average of 8 million jobs posted online in the U.S. every month of last year, while 13 million people continued to search for work during the exact same months? The reason is that the U.S. — along with just about every other country — is suffering from a talent mismatch: employers cannot find individuals with the skills and capabilities they need, where and when they need them. The problem is not just one of location and timing, however. There is no mechanism that reliably signals which skills employers need so that individuals and schools can develop those skills. In other words, the relationship between supply and demand is tenuous at best. The job market simply doesn’t function the way a market should.

Experts have examined the problem from every angle and concluded that, if left unresolved, the skills mismatch will continue to eat away at U.S. competiveness. Research by the McKinsey Global Institute predictsthat by 2020, the U.S. will need to create 21 million new jobs to return to full employment but, should present trends continue, there will be 1.5 million too few college graduates to meet demand and that 5.9 million people will not have the education employers require and will therefore be unemployable. That’s why at ManpowerGroup we believe that investment ought to focus on youth, who are now entering the market and who most need training. Building their skills will help unleash their potential and start to close the widening gap. Still, while I cannot overstate the importance of training, it alone will not solve the labor market’s structural dysfunction.

How can the U.S. labor market become more efficient? Leer más “The Market that Needs a Market Maker”

Solution Revealed: Economist Ideas Economy Cyberschool Challenge Winner – Andrew Deonarine

In locations such as South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, children, teens, and adults do not have access to education. Many are illiterate, and cannot make use of books and other learning material. While some technologies, such as inexpensive laptops and tablets have been proposed to address the educational needs of this population, the devices are too expensive, require some degree of literacy, and are difficult to implement in resource poor areas. However, cellular phones have significant penetration in the world’s poorest countries, since they provide a means to make a living. In essence, they comprise a global, untapped computer network. [Más…]

In this solution, I have presented a cellular phone based technology called EduCell that develops and distributes educational material using a method called PhoneCasting. PhoneCasting allows someone to write their own educational program using their phone and distribute it to other devices. EduCell consists of a piece of software that that runs small multi-lingual “scripts”, easily developed by local teachers in developing countries. Scripts are then assembled with multimedia to create interactive modules that teach reading, writing, arithmetic, etc. Modules can then distributed (PhoneCasted) to millions of other phones via an Internet server, or pre-loaded, at no cost. The benefits of the PhoneCasting technology are significant: a software programmer or knowledge of English is not required to produce content, which democratizes software development. This would, for the first time, make basic literacy and educational material accessible to hundreds of millions of cellular phone users, and their children, around the world.


http://blog.innocentive.com/2010/09/30/solution-revealed-economist-ideas-economy-cyberschool-challenge-winner-andrew-deonarine/

I’m a Solver | Andrew Deonarine

Andrew Deonarine is the winner of the first Economist-InnoCentive Challenge, 21st Century Cyber Schools.

Earlier this month, The Economist announced a winner in the 21st Century Cyber Schools Challenge.  There were many strong submissions, and the team decided that the two runners up also deserved recognition for their outstanding solutions.  We will be posting solution summaries from the Challenge winner, Andrew Deonarine, as well as the two runners up in this Challenge, Tristram Hewitt and Daniel Rasmus.  Congratulations Andrew, Tristram and Daniel.

Below is a summary of the winning solution from Andrew Deonarine.  To see a larger version of the image, right click and select “view image”

CyberSchools Schematic for Blog

In locations such as South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, children, teens, and adults do not have access to education. Many are illiterate, and cannot make use of books and other learning material. While some technologies, such as inexpensive laptops and tablets have been proposed to address the educational needs of this population, the devices are too expensive, require some degree of literacy, and are difficult to implement in resource poor areas. However, cellular phones have significant penetration in the world’s poorest countries, since they provide a means to make a living. In essence, they comprise a global, untapped computer network. Leer más “Solution Revealed: Economist Ideas Economy Cyberschool Challenge Winner – Andrew Deonarine”

Reflections on Open Innovation

“The next challenge of Open Innovation ” is the title of a article HBR in John Hagel III and John Seely Brown, who points out some directions , not way forward, but questions.

There you can read …“Thus it’s little surprise that nearly every company now has some sort of experiment or program relating to open innovation. Open innovation means reaching out to take advantage of talent beyond the firm (or responding to such outreach opportunities). It’s a terrific concept, borne out by several oft-repeated examples such as InnoCentive and GoldCorp.

But are companies, with all their good intentions, getting the most from open innovation? We suspect that the initial successes, encouraging as they are, represent only the beginning. What if open innovation were defined more broadly and more ambitiously? Could even greater value be realized? If so, what would the next wave of open innovation look like?”


Por jabaldaia | //abaldaia.wordpress.com

What do you think?

“The next challenge of Open Innovationis the title of a article HBR in John Hagel III and John Seely Brown, who points out some directions , not way forward, but questions.

There you can read …“Thus it’s little surprise that nearly every company now has some sort of experiment or program relating to open innovation. Open innovation means reaching out to take advantage of talent beyond the firm (or responding to such outreach opportunities). It’s a terrific concept, borne out by several oft-repeated examples such as InnoCentive and GoldCorp.

But are companies, with all their good intentions, getting the most from open innovation? We suspect that the initial successes, encouraging as they are, represent only the beginning. What if open innovation were defined more broadly and more ambitiously? Could even greater value be realized? If so, what would the next wave of open innovation look like?” Leer más “Reflections on Open Innovation”

Enhancing Creativity – Adult Games versus Kid Games

They typically have a complex set of rules that all of the players need to adhere to. If you break the rules you “go to jail,” are disqualified, or get penalized.

Adult games end. The game is over when all of the other players are out of money, when the “clock” says there is not more time, or when everyone has had their turn.

And nearly every adult game has a winner and one or more losers. They are competitions.

Contrast this with kid games.


by Stephen Shapiro

Enhancing Creativity - Adult Games versus Kids GamesIn my blog post, “How Can Goals Enhance Creativity” I said…

“…As long as everyone in the organization believes they are playing a game which is designed to get them energized today, and it is not specifically about hitting the target, I can assure you that people will be more motivated.”

Games can be a useful tool for enhancing creativity. They make work more fun, they reduce stress, and they get people in action.

HOWEVER…

Not all games are created equally. There are adult games and kid games.

With adult games, there tend to be rigid rules, the games have an ending, and there are winners and losers.

Think about nearly every game we play: Monopoly, poker, or basketball. Leer más “Enhancing Creativity – Adult Games versus Kid Games”

[RETRO NEWS / 2007] Crowdsourcing = Explotación laboral / Retrospección en la oportunidad de las crisis, o soluciones de inteligencia colectiva???

[RETRO NEWS / 2007] Crowdsourcing = Explotación laboral / Retrospección en la oportunidad de las crisis, o soluciones de inteligencia colectiva???

A diario, la lectura obligada y recopilación de información (clipping) de las más destacadas lecturas, sites, blogs, portales…desde marketing, comunicación, IT, política. Lo que impulsa un conocimiento de lo que sucede, de lo que no, de lo que se dice sin ser dicho, constituyen un ejercicio a diario, para intentar comprender todo “del todo que nos rodea”. Apenas alcanzado un parte y sin saber que el todo, no se compre con la lógica del saber “científico”, muy por el contrario, profundiza aquella información, data, que no surge, sino que debe ser interpretada.

La suma de interpretaciones, de eso que hemos de llamar inteligencia colectiva, nos resume como una Central de Inteligencia Interpretativa, deja la mesa servida para la resolución (zanahoria mediante) a empresas que buscan talentos con la capacidad de resolver la suma de las partes…crowdsourcing 2010, es una oportunidad constante?, o las empresas aprovechan la capacidad de innovación externa, porque carecen de innovación interna?

(By Gabriel Catalano)

La investigación ‘crowdsourcing’ reabre el debate de la explotación laboral
Grandes corporaciones, pequeñas empresas e incluso prestigiosas instituciones utilizan la red para exponer públicamente sus líneas de investigación y ofrecer recompensas a quienes encuentren sus soluciones

R. BOSCO / S. CALDANA 11/01/2007

Si usted ya se había aprendido lo que era un e-mail y un podcast; la diferencia entre un spammer y un blogger; o entre un copyright y un copyleft, la palabra para 2007 es crowdsourcing.

El crowdsourcing es una práctica más de la Web 2.0, es decir, la web social, basada en la inteligencia colectiva y en el protagonismo del público, que ya no sólo mira, sino que pone los contenidos. Ejemplos ya clásicos son la enciclopedia Wikipedia o el sitio de vídeos YouTube.

Si crowdsourcing indica participación, también muestra un parentesco con otra palabra ya familiar (aunque costó), outsourcing, encargo de trabajo de una empresa pero fuera de ella, buscando un menor coste.

El crowdsourcing -término acuñado por el escritor Jeff Howe y el editor de la revista Wired, Mark Robinson- consiste en externalizar el trabajo, sobre todo intelectual, a través de Internet, es decir, utilizar el potencial de los millones de cerebros que están conectados a la Red.

Bajo el lema compartir, difundir y participar, el crowdsourcing hace posibles proyectos como la enciclopedia libre Wikipedia y genera una nueva forma de relación laboral y de polémica.


The crowdsourcing process in eight steps.
Image via Wikipedia

A diario, la lectura obligada y recopilación de información (clipping) de las más destacadas lecturas, sites, blogs, portales…desde marketing, comunicación, IT, política. Lo que impulsa un conocimiento de lo que sucede, de lo que no, de lo que se dice sin ser dicho, constituyen un ejercicio a diario, para intentar comprender todo “del todo que nos rodea”. Apenas alcanzado un parte y sin saber que el todo, no se compre con la lógica del saber “científico”, muy por el contrario, profundiza aquella información, data, que no surge, sino que debe ser interpretada.

La suma de interpretaciones, de eso que hemos de llamar inteligencia colectiva, nos resume como una Central de Inteligencia Interpretativa, deja la mesa servida para la resolución (zanahoria mediante) a empresas que buscan talentos con la capacidad de resolver la suma de las partes…crowdsourcing 2010, es una oportunidad constante?, o las empresas aprovechan la capacidad de innovación externa, porque carecen de innovación interna?

(By Gabriel Catalano)

———————————————————————————————————————————————
La investigación ‘crowdsourcing’ reabre el debate de la explotación laboral

Grandes corporaciones, pequeñas empresas e incluso prestigiosas instituciones utilizan la red para exponer públicamente sus líneas de investigación y ofrecer recompensas a quienes encuentren sus soluciones

R. BOSCO / S. CALDANA 11/01/2007

Si usted ya se había aprendido lo que era un e-mail y un podcast; la diferencia entre un spammer y un blogger; o entre un copyright y un copyleft, la palabra para 2007 es crowdsourcing.

El crowdsourcing es una práctica más de la Web 2.0, es decir, la web social, basada en la inteligencia colectiva y en el protagonismo del público, que ya no sólo mira, sino que pone los contenidos. Ejemplos ya clásicos son la enciclopedia Wikipedia o el sitio de vídeos YouTube.

Si crowdsourcing indica participación, también muestra un parentesco con otra palabra ya familiar (aunque costó), outsourcing, encargo de trabajo de una empresa pero fuera de ella, buscando un menor coste.

El crowdsourcing -término acuñado por el escritor Jeff Howe y el editor de la revista Wired, Mark Robinson- consiste en externalizar el trabajo, sobre todo intelectual, a través de Internet, es decir, utilizar el potencial de los millones de cerebros que están conectados a la Red.

Bajo el lema compartir, difundir y participar, el crowdsourcing hace posibles proyectos como la enciclopedia libre Wikipedia y genera una nueva forma de relación laboral y de polémica. Leer más “[RETRO NEWS / 2007] Crowdsourcing = Explotación laboral / Retrospección en la oportunidad de las crisis, o soluciones de inteligencia colectiva???”

OnInnovation : Visionaries thinking out loud™

Low Tech Tools to Foster High Output Innovation Thinking

One of the questions often asked by those seeking to create a strong innovation culture is, “What are some good tools for engaging people across my organization?” Well the consultant in me would usually hedge his bets and would offer the universal response, “It depends.” But that is as singularly unsatisfying to say as it is to hear, so I mostly take a multiple alternative approach in the hopes of landing close to the targeted need. The first place I usually start is with some of the very lowest of low tech: playing cards, or their trading card equivalent. Why? Because they are fast, fun, revealing, and energizing in a way that is distinct from other more formal tools.

The idea of using playing cards in unique ways is not anything new. Did you know that there aren’t only four suites of playing cards? We all know the usual suspects of Hearts, Diamonds, Spades and Clubs. There are also fifth suit variants that introduced an additional suit. Depending the time, location and game being played these suits might have been, Royales, Eagles, Stars, Pentagons, Quotations, or even Aether. Some modified decks have additional face cards and additional numbered cards, too. In the United States of America, in 1895, a gentleman by the name of Hiram Jones created a deck called “International Playing Cards” and it had two additional suits, a red suit with crosses and a black suit of bullets. Innovation in playing cards has a long and storied history.

The interest expressed by many clients is focused on how to use standard cards in a unique manner. Marshall McLuhan, the noted advertising guru of the 20th Century used a standard set of four-suit playing cards as the basis for his creative thought starter set, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck. The namesake Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line was an integrated chain of some 63 radar and communication stations, stretching across Arctic Canada at approximately the 69th parallel designed to provide advance warning of imminent air attack to Canada and the United States. The DEW Line was considered a perfect metaphor by McLuhan on the role of art and the artist at a time of rapid social and technological change and he repeated the idea frequently.

To the blind all things are sudden. -Quote on the Jack of Diamonds in Marshall McLuhan’s Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck


Playing with a Full Deck

Posted by DrewMarshall on July 30, 2010

Low Tech Tools to Foster High Output Innovation Thinking
One of the questions often asked by those seeking to create a strong innovation culture is, “What are some good tools for engaging people across my organization?” Well the consultant in me would usually hedge his bets and would offer the universal response, “It depends.” But that […]

Low Tech Tools to Foster High Output Innovation Thinking

One of the questions often asked by those seeking to create a strong innovation culture is, “What are some good tools for engaging people across my organization?” Well the consultant in me would usually hedge his bets and would offer the universal response, “It depends.” But that is as singularly unsatisfying to say as it is to hear, so I mostly take a multiple alternative approach in the hopes of landing close to the targeted need. The first place I usually start is with some of the very lowest of low tech: playing cards, or their trading card equivalent. Why? Because they are fast, fun, revealing, and energizing in a way that is distinct from other more formal tools.

The idea of using playing cards in unique ways is not anything new. Did you know that there aren’t only four suites of playing cards? We all know the usual suspects of Hearts, Diamonds, Spades and Clubs. There are also fifth suit variants that introduced an additional suit. Depending the time, location and game being played these suits might have been, Royales, Eagles, Stars, Pentagons, Quotations, or even Aether. Some modified decks have additional face cards and additional numbered cards, too. In the United States of America, in 1895, a gentleman by the name of Hiram Jones created a deck called “International Playing Cards” and it had two additional suits, a red suit with crosses and a black suit of bullets. Innovation in playing cards has a long and storied history.

The interest expressed by many clients is focused on how to use standard cards in a unique manner. Marshall McLuhan, the noted advertising guru of the 20th Century used a standard set of four-suit playing cards as the basis for his creative thought starter set, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck. The namesake Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line was an integrated chain of some 63 radar and communication stations, stretching across Arctic Canada at approximately the 69th parallel designed to provide advance warning of imminent air attack to Canada and the United States. The DEW Line was considered a perfect metaphor by McLuhan on the role of art and the artist at a time of rapid social and technological change and he repeated the idea frequently.

To the blind all things are sudden. -Quote on the Jack of Diamonds in Marshall McLuhan’s Distant Early Warning (DEW) Card Deck Leer más “OnInnovation : Visionaries thinking out loud™”

Top 5 Open Innovation Companies – July

Stefan Lindegaard

Here comes a list of my current favorite open innovation companies.

The list is by no means based on in-depth research. It is based on actions, initiatives or shared insights of these companies over the last month or so – and thus what I believe should inspire other companies.

1. GE – for leading the way with a $200 million challenge

GE shows us the future of innovation by assembling a great team of partners as well as the rest of us as they work to solve some critical issues. Their challenge is a great initiative that I will write more about in a separate post.

2. P&G – for addressing language barriers on their Connect+Develop platform

The more time I spent in places such as Brazil and China, I begin to understand the importance of having multi-language versions of open innovation initiatives. It is simply not good enough that companies with plenty of resources for unknown reasons decide not to address language issues. They miss out on interesting opportunities.

By adding Spanish and Portuguese versions to their Connect+Develop platform, which already had a Chinese version, P&G once again leads the way.

3. Siemens – for a report that provides great insights into b2b open innovation

Granted, the report is a few months old, but I still think it is an impressive presentation of open innovation initiatives in a large b2b-focused company…


Stefan Lindegaard

Here comes a list of my current favorite open innovation companies.

The list is by no means based on in-depth research. It is based on actions, initiatives or shared insights of these companies over the last month or so – and thus what I believe should inspire other companies.

1. GE – for leading the way with a $200 million challenge

GE shows us the future of innovation by assembling a great team of partners as well as the rest of us as they work to solve some critical issues. Their challenge is a great initiative that I will write more about in a separate post.

2. P&G – for addressing language barriers on their Connect+Develop platform

The more time I spent in places such as Brazil and China, I begin to understand the importance of having multi-language versions of open innovation initiatives. It is simply not good enough that companies with plenty of resources for unknown reasons decide not to address language issues. They miss out on interesting opportunities.

By adding Spanish and Portuguese versions to their Connect+Develop platform, which already had a Chinese version, P&G once again leads the way.

3. Siemens – for a report that provides great insights into b2b open innovation

Granted, the report is a few months old, but I still think it is an impressive presentation of open innovation initiatives in a large b2b-focused company… Leer más “Top 5 Open Innovation Companies – July”