Brand Icons ‘Guest Star’ in Xerox Campaign

The ads are meant to show how Xerox enables each of these businesses to succeed, illustrated by the various tasks each of the brand mascots juggles. A print ad featuring Mr. Clean, for instance, has him wiping a table while attempting to copy a pile of documents. The copy reads: “We focus on digitizing P&G’s documents worldwide. So they don’t have to.”

So what’s the underlying message? “When you’ve got Xerox working behind the scenes, you have the freedom to focus on your core and real business,” Carone said.

Tony Granger, global chief creative officer at WPP-owned Y&R, said the mascots function as a sort of customer testimonial, albeit with a unique spin. “At the end of the day, Xerox is about helping customers be successful, and using their customers’ brand icons was a fun way of saying that,” he said.


– Elaine Wong
Xerox is prepping a new campaign, via Y&R, New York, as part of an effort to position itself as more than just a printer and copier maker. The effort spans TV, print, out-of-home and digital, and is one of the largest brand initiatives in decades for Xerox.

The move follows the company’s acquisition of Affiliated Computer Services in February, making it a bigger player in the information technology space. Valued at $6 billion, the deal nearly tripled Xerox’s services business, said chief marketing officer Christa Carone.

Dubbed “Ready for real business,” the campaign launches next Tuesday. Notable in the ads is Xerox’s use of well known brand mascots: Procter & Gamble’s Mr. Clean, Target’s Bullseye dog and the Marriott Hotels & Resorts’ bellman, to name a few. All of the icons featured in the ads are current Xerox clients, Carone said.
Leer más “Brand Icons ‘Guest Star’ in Xerox Campaign”

US Navy outlines cyber-security strategy

Navy Chief Information Officer Robert Carey has outlined several possible approaches to improving cyber-security within the sea branch of the US armed forces.

According to Carey, industry, academia, military, civilians and contractors must work as a team towards a “singular” purpose: to operate and defend the Department’s networks against attack, while enabling access to information for those who require it.

“Defenders [must be] trained as attackers. While I know this is done in small pockets, it has yet to become doctrine throughout the Department,” he explained in an official blog post.

US Navy outlines cyber-security strategy”We need to ensure that our network defenders possess the same skills and knowledge as our attackers. Our goal should be to break down the barriers between the defenders and the red teams. After all, we are all on the same team.”

However, Carey acknowledged that a multi-pronged approach was necessary – as “no one tool” was capable of “carrying” the day.

“[Indeed], different proprietary tools produce non-interoperable solutions, which produce exploitable gaps in our defenses.

“[As such], the Department’s tools must be smartly integrated into a defensive suite, using automation where appropriate so that we can, in fact, defend at Internet speeds.”


Aharon Etengoff

Navy Chief Information Officer Robert Carey has outlined several possible approaches to improving cyber-security within the sea branch of the US armed forces.

According to Carey, industry, academia, military, civilians and contractors must work as a team towards a “singular” purpose: to operate and defend the Department’s networks against attack, while enabling access to information for those who require it.

“Defenders [must be] trained as attackers. While I know this is done in small pockets, it has yet to become doctrine throughout the Department,” he explained in an official blog post.

US Navy outlines cyber-security strategy“We need to ensure that our network defenders possess the same skills and knowledge as our attackers. Our goal should be to break down the barriers between the defenders and the red teams. After all, we are all on the same team.”

However, Carey acknowledged that a multi-pronged approach was necessary – as “no one tool” was capable of “carrying” the day.

“[Indeed], different proprietary tools produce non-interoperable solutions, which produce exploitable gaps in our defenses.

“[As such], the Department’s tools must be smartly integrated into a defensive suite, using automation where appropriate so that we can, in fact, defend at Internet speeds.” Leer más “US Navy outlines cyber-security strategy”

The 3 Tensions of Internal IT Innovation

by Jonathan Reichental | IT Innovations, PwC

Internal IT innovation is all about converting ideas, those specifically supported by new technologies, into business value. These innovations often focus on needs such as improved internal processes or alternative and creative ways to support market activities. Four years into leading PwC’s IT innovation efforts, I’ve certainly observed enough of what works and what creates challenge to write a book on the subject. For this blog posting I’m going to briefly discuss an element of what I’ve experienced. It’s what I will call the 3 tensions of internal IT innovation.


by Jonathan Reichental | IT Innovations, PwC

Internal IT innovation is all about converting ideas, those specifically supported by new technologies, into business value. These innovations often focus on needs such as improved internal processes or alternative and creative ways to support market activities. Four years into leading PwC’s IT innovation efforts, I’ve certainly observed enough of what works and what creates challenge to write a book on the subject.  For this blog posting I’m going to briefly discuss an element of what I’ve experienced. It’s what I will call the 3 tensions of internal IT innovation. Leer más “The 3 Tensions of Internal IT Innovation”

In Defense of The Jack of All Trades

“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, conn a ship, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve an equation, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.” Robert A. Heinlein

It seems that the topic of specialization has come into focus yet again in the web world and with it, the people who say being a “jack of all trades” is a useless thing to strive for.

A lot of web professionals are pushing newcomers to specialize in a single area to make themselves more marketable and employable. Without a doubt, specialists will always be needed in any industry. But is it really so bad to be a web generalist?

Being considered a “jack of all trades” has always had a negative connotation. It implies that you dabble in bits of everything, but never achieve the expertise needed to be good at any one pursuit.

Maybe a successful generalist should instead be considered a “Renaissance man” (or woman).

Few would argue that DaVinci should have stuck to one subject.


“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, design a building, conn a ship, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve an equation, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.” Robert A. Heinlein

It seems that the topic of specialization has come into focus yet again in the web world and with it, the people who say being a “jack of all trades” is a useless thing to strive for.

A lot of web professionals are pushing newcomers to specialize in a single area to make themselves more marketable and employable. Without a doubt, specialists will always be needed in any industry. But is it really so bad to be a web generalist?

//

Being considered a “jack of all trades” has always had a negative connotation. It implies that you dabble in bits of everything, but never achieve the expertise needed to be good at any one pursuit.

Maybe a successful generalist should instead be considered a “Renaissance man” (or woman).

Few would argue that DaVinci should have stuck to one subject. Leer más “In Defense of The Jack of All Trades”

The Long-Term Jobless: Left Behind

Workers in technology, telecom, and finance are at greatest risk because skills in the fast-changing industries can quickly become obsolete

By Timothy R. Homan and Zachary Tracer

To understand the potential consequences of long-term unemployment, consider the job prospects of Sheldon Fisher and Douglas Lawson. In January, Fisher, 53, was dismissed from a software company in Washington State. Lawson, 34, lost his job in October with a builder in South Carolina. Now the technology industry is bouncing back while construction remains in the dumps, and Washington’s jobless rate is 8.9 percent, vs. South Carolina’s 10.7 percent. Still, Lawson’s prospects may be better than Fisher’s.

That’s because being jobless for a long time hurts workers in some industries far more than in others. The technology sector is known for such rapid change that those out of work for even a few months can find themselves with out-of-date skills. Construction skills are far less likely to grow stale. “I never forget what I know. … I’m not worried about doing the work once I get it,” says Lawson, who has applied for about 30 jobs so far. Fisher, by contrast, is considering leaving information technology altogether, though he says he’s not sure what else he’s qualified to do. After applying for about 100 jobs in his first half-year out of work, Fisher began to worry that employers might think he was getting rusty. “Then everything after six months just makes it worse,” he says.

The average duration of unemployment in the U.S. jumped to a record 35.2 weeks in June, up from 16.5 weeks when the recession began in December 2007, according to the Labor Dept. Today, almost half of unemployed Americans have been out of work for 27 weeks or more (the official definition of long-term unemployment), vs. 30 percent in June 2009.
Perishable Skills

Industries with highly perishable skill sets include health-care technology, telecommunications, and finance, where regulations have changed dramatically in the past year. The toughest, though, may be information technology. Companies in that sector have cut payrolls for 32 of the last 33 months, through June, for a cumulative loss of some 312,000 jobs, or about 10 percent. In technology, “if you’ve been out of work for a year or two, you’re probably somewhat outdated,” says Shami Khorana, president of HCL America, the U.S. arm of New Delhi-based HCL Technologies, which employs about 5,000 workers in the U.S. He plans to hire at least an additional 600 people as the economy improves and anticipates retraining some candidates with obsolete skills.

Unemployed workers in construction, retail, low-level health-care jobs, and teaching are more likely to be attractive to employers once hiring picks up because such jobs don’t change as quickly, experts say. “You don’t get the sense that residential construction has changed that much in the past decade,” says Harry J. Holzer, an economist at Georgetown University and the Urban Institute in Washington. The skills needed to work at a grocery or clothing store—running the cash register, for instance—are “rudimentary,” he says.


Workers in technology, telecom, and finance are at greatest risk because skills in the fast-changing industries can quickly become obsolete

By Timothy R. Homan and Zachary Tracer

To understand the potential consequences of long-term unemployment, consider the job prospects of Sheldon Fisher and Douglas Lawson. In January, Fisher, 53, was dismissed from a software company in Washington State. Lawson, 34, lost his job in October with a builder in South Carolina. Now the technology industry is bouncing back while construction remains in the dumps, and Washington’s jobless rate is 8.9 percent, vs. South Carolina’s 10.7 percent. Still, Lawson’s prospects may be better than Fisher’s.

That’s because being jobless for a long time hurts workers in some industries far more than in others. The technology sector is known for such rapid change that those out of work for even a few months can find themselves with out-of-date skills. Construction skills are far less likely to grow stale. “I never forget what I know. … I’m not worried about doing the work once I get it,” says Lawson, who has applied for about 30 jobs so far. Fisher, by contrast, is considering leaving information technology altogether, though he says he’s not sure what else he’s qualified to do. After applying for about 100 jobs in his first half-year out of work, Fisher began to worry that employers might think he was getting rusty. “Then everything after six months just makes it worse,” he says.

The average duration of unemployment in the U.S. jumped to a record 35.2 weeks in June, up from 16.5 weeks when the recession began in December 2007, according to the Labor Dept. Today, almost half of unemployed Americans have been out of work for 27 weeks or more (the official definition of long-term unemployment), vs. 30 percent in June 2009.

Perishable Skills

Industries with highly perishable skill sets include health-care technology, telecommunications, and finance, where regulations have changed dramatically in the past year. The toughest, though, may be information technology. Companies in that sector have cut payrolls for 32 of the last 33 months, through June, for a cumulative loss of some 312,000 jobs, or about 10 percent. In technology, “if you’ve been out of work for a year or two, you’re probably somewhat outdated,” says Shami Khorana, president of HCL America, the U.S. arm of New Delhi-based HCL Technologies, which employs about 5,000 workers in the U.S. He plans to hire at least an additional 600 people as the economy improves and anticipates retraining some candidates with obsolete skills.

Unemployed workers in construction, retail, low-level health-care jobs, and teaching are more likely to be attractive to employers once hiring picks up because such jobs don’t change as quickly, experts say. “You don’t get the sense that residential construction has changed that much in the past decade,” says Harry J. Holzer, an economist at Georgetown University and the Urban Institute in Washington. The skills needed to work at a grocery or clothing store—running the cash register, for instance—are “rudimentary,” he says. Leer más “The Long-Term Jobless: Left Behind”

Project-Based Learning: How Students Learn Teamwork, Critical Thinking And Communication Skills


What is project-based learning? PBL is a new learning approach which places greater emphasis on targeting the learning of complex experiences, geared to a specific goal or objective, in place of the traditional academic approach strongly focusing on rote memorization of multiple information items alienated from their practical, real-world uses. The objective is the one of equipping young generations with the mental tools needed to face the complex, fast-changing nature of the information-based economy they are preparing themselves for.

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Photo credit: Clipart

The big problem is that the present educational paradigm is simply inadequate when it comes to providing our young kids with the challenges, methods, exercises and approaches that can help them use their intellect in critical ways, that can help them analyze and evaluate information, and that trains them to become excellent listeners and communicators.

Did school ever teach you how you can verify, question or even challenge any source of information? Or how you should best organize your work when working in a collaborative team? Or how to present information in effective ways so that complex ideas can be easily communicated to others? I bet the answers to all these is a systematic “no“.

In today’s traditional classrooms, students typically work on simple assignments that emphasize short-term content memorization; they work alone, write for the teacher alone, and rarely make presentations. They are trained day-in and day-out to serve this one-to-one relationship with their teacher(s) which is hardly representative of the demands and challenges that they will have to face in real-life.

Instead, by using this so-calledproject-based learning approach“, students are guided to work on long-term challenges that involve real-life problems. This helps students see the complexity and interdisciplinary aspects of any job or activity in a more realistic fashion, helping them prepare more effectively for the real challenges ahead.

In this process, students are also motivated to learn how to use new technologies to support such assignments. Technology and the internet can in fact greatly help them do better research, analysis, and evaluation of alternative solutions, communicate and present more effectively their ideas and projects to others and learn how to collaborate and work with a distributed team.

In project-based learning students are finally given the opportunity to go through an educational approach which allows them to transcend the limiting nature of the one-to-one teacher-student relationships in favor of mastering how to collaborate and arrive at results efficiently while working with others. And at the same time the classical teacher role itself needs, under this perspective, to transform itself into the one of a facilitator, a guide.

In this fascinating report, Bob Pearlman, illustrates effectively the key traits and characteristics that make project-based learning so different from any traditional school learning curriculum.

……………………………………………………………………………………

Students Thrive On Cooperation and Problem Solving

by Bob Pearlman

Why Learning and Schooling Must Be Totally Transformed

project_based_learning_schooling_transformed_kid_23141080_size255.jpg

Let’s assume the No Child Left Behind Act works fine and that by 2014 every student meets the targeted standards and passes his or her state’s exit exam.

Will those students be successful as citizens and workers in the twenty-first century? Not a chance.

Let’s further assume that each state’s governor gets the one-on-one computer bug and equips all of each state’s students with top-flight portable PCs. Will these students now be successful as citizens and workers in the twenty-first century?

Again, not a chance.

No matter how sophisticated the tools we put in classrooms, the curriculum designed to educate students to meet the new standards is sorely inadequate to help them after they leave school.

In short, learning – and schooling – must be totally transformed.

Today’s graduates need to be critical thinkers, problem solvers, and effective communicators who are proficient in both core subjects and new, twenty-first-century content and skills,” according to Results that Matter: 21st Century Skills and High School Reform, a report issued in March by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills.

These include:

  • Learning and thinking skills,
  • information and communications-technology literacy skills, and
  • life skills.

Students of today enter an increasingly globalized world in which technology plays a vital role. They must be good communicators, as well as great collaborators.

The new work environment requires responsibility and self-management, as well as interpersonal and project-management skills that demand teamwork and leadership.

http://www.masternewmedia.org/project-based-learning-how-students-learn-teamwork-critical-thinking-and-communication-skills/

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La crisis se ceba con las creativas


De los 1.300 millones de euros de 2008 a los 731 millones registrados el pasado año. La actividad de nuevo negocio de las agencias creativas cayó casi la mitad durante el pasado ejercicio, según nbScore de Grupo Consultores.


De todas ellas, las menos perjudicadas han sido las agencias independientes al obtener el 26,2% del negocio, por delante de los grupos internacionales.
De las conclusiones del análisis, Grupo Consultores se queda con las numerosas adjudicaciones de proyectos y campañas específicas que se produjeron el pasado ejercicio, así como con la elevada concurrencia de agencias a cada concurso. Una situación que, según la consultora, coincide con la que se ha producido en otros mercados internacionales. De todos ellos, destacan los casos de China y Japón donde un 43% y un 50%, respectivamente, del nuevo negocio adjudicado a agencias creativas procede de proyectos.

Por su parte, la actividad de nuevo negocio del año 2009 se ha mantenido prácticamente estable en el área de medios, con un volumen de nuevo negocio de 1.423 Millones de euros, lo que represente únicamente un 3% menos que en 2008. Leer más “La crisis se ceba con las creativas”