5 Innovations Inspired by Liberation of Data

The air was electric. Voices buzzed in anticipation. I had never seen so many people in once place that were all excited about health data. I actually felt a bit giddy.

That was the scene at yesterday’s Community Health Data Forum at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC. Following the liberation of several government health datasets in March, app developers dashed to see what they could build in 12 short weeks to visualize and make sense of the data. They showcased their solutions yesterday, and applauded HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ assertion that “government should be transparent, open, participatory.”



The air was electric. Voices buzzed in anticipation. I had never seen so many people in once place that were all excited about health data. I actually felt a bit giddy.

That was the scene at yesterday’s Community Health Data Forum at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC. Following the liberation of several government health datasets in March, app developers dashed to see what they could build in 12 short weeks to visualize and make sense of the data. They showcased their solutions yesterday, and applauded HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ assertion that “government should be transparent, open, participatory.”

Here are the top 5 innovations I saw: Leer más “5 Innovations Inspired by Liberation of Data”

Moving Beyond Open Innovation

Opening up R&D organizations to outside ideas has become a powerful weapon in the strategic arsenal of research managers. As Henry Chesbrough writes, “[O]pen innovation is a paradigm that assumes that firms can and should use external ideas as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as the firms look to advance their technology.” This strategy has been associated with notable commercial successes, such as Procter & Gamble’s SpinBrush, sourced not from internal R&D but rather a group of inventors in Cleveland. Increasingly, we see a coterie of firms from IBM to GlaxoSmithKline orienting their research strategy around open approaches.

But even textbook applications of open innovation still reflect a traditional emphasis in large organizations on large bets and big breakthroughs. In the end, what open innovation accomplishes is a shift of source for some big breakthroughs, from inside the company’s R&D organization to the outside.


The crowdsourcing process in eight steps.
Image via Wikipedia

Opening up R&D organizations to outside ideas has become a powerful weapon in the strategic arsenal of research managers. As Henry Chesbrough writes, “[O]pen innovation is a paradigm that assumes that firms can and should use external ideas as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as the firms look to advance their technology.”  This strategy has been associated with notable commercial successes, such as Procter & Gamble’s SpinBrush, sourced not from internal R&D but rather a group of inventors in Cleveland. Increasingly, we see a coterie of firms from IBM to GlaxoSmithKline orienting their research strategy around open approaches.

But even textbook applications of open innovation still reflect a traditional emphasis in large organizations on large bets and big breakthroughs. In the end, what open innovation accomplishes is a shift of source for some big breakthroughs, from inside the company’s R&D organization to the outside. Leer más “Moving Beyond Open Innovation”