Aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea para Mac OS X | Bitelia.com


Bitelia.com

Hace algunos días les presentamos una lista con algunas alternativas a los mensajeros instantáneos más populares, Windows Live Messenger y Gtalk –también conocido de forma pedestre como “el chat de Google”-. Pero el Mac tiene su propio universo y también otras alternativas de mensajeros. Además de iChat, el que viene de forma nativa cuando prendemos por primera vez el ordenador apenas salido de su hermoso packaging, tenemos otras opciones para instalar. A continuación, vamos a repasar las mejores alternativas a mensajeros instantáneos para Mac OS X.

Adium

Esta es, al menos en mi opinión, la mejor alternativa que podemos usar en Mac.  Adium es un programa multiplataforma que soporta a múltiples servicios de mensajería instantánea. Por ejemplo, podemos sincronizar en un mismo lugar nuestras cuentas de MSN y Gtalk, por ejemplo. Pero además de esto, tenemos otras opciones de integración con el ecosistema Mac que hace que sea la opción indudable. Este programa Open Source también cuenta con una interfaz de usuario muy agradable e intuitiva, con ventanas de chat en formato de pestañas para estar más organizados y no crear múltiples ventanas que retarden al ordenador.

En cuanto a integración con Mac OS X, se puede sincronizar con la libreta de direcciones y contactos que viene de forma nativa con la computadora. Cuando usamos múltiples cuentas –por ejemplo de diferentes correos electrónicos- podemos hacer una unión de los correos de nuestros contactos en un solo perfil para estar más organizados. Por ejemplo, si tenemos a una persona en MSN y también en GTalk, podemos verlos online y chatear con ellos sin importar desde donde estén conectados. Con Adium también se puedentransferir archivos, algo fundamental, pero lamentablemente no se pueden hacer conversaciones en grupo o en video, pero sí nos da opciones de seguridad –cifrado de conversaciones-. Finalmente, viene en versión portable, si trabajamos en muchos Macs periódicamente es algo que no viene para nada mal.

InstantBird

InstantBird es otro sistema multiplataforma –no solamente podemos usarlo en Mac sino también en Windows y Linux-, con la posibilidad de sincronizar diferentes cuentas de varios servicios. Una de las mejores funcionalidades es que no solamente puede oficiar de mensajero instantáneo, sino que además nos permiteadministrar redes sociales –de la misma forma que Digsby, en el caso de Windows- como Facebook y Twitter. InstantBird está construido sobre Mozilla 16.0.2 lo que permite que haya actualizaciones en base a complementos de terceros que se pueden encontrar en la página de InstantBird. En cuanto a interfaz, se jacta de tener una muy limpia y simple de usar, sin demasiados abalorios para priorizar la experiencia del contacto y nada más.

De la misma forma que Adium, también divide las conversaciones en pestañas en lugar de ventanas, para facilitar la navegación. Dichas pestañas se pueden reorganizar moviéndolas de acuerdo con la prioridad, por ejemplo, pero lo más interesante es que se pueden crear ventanas nuevas arrastrando una de las pestañas fuera de la ventana original, de la misma forma que se abren nuevas ventanas en un navegador. Otra cosa que comparte con Adium es la posibilidad de unir contactos. También cuenta con potentes herramientas de búsqueda de contactos y de conversaciones, fundamental para una herramienta de trabajo. Es ideal para usuarios que estén acostumbrados a usar Firefox en sus ordenadores, porque tiene muchos puntos en común.

Messenger for Mac

The Revolution Will Be Telepresenced

For some reason, I have never fully adopted the use of video conferencing.

In my defense, I think I’ve been pretty accepting when it comes to incorporating new technologies and communications platforms in my daily routine. Over the years, I’ve expanded from AIM and AOL chatrooms to GChat and message boards, from (gulp!) MiGente to Facebook and Twitter. But, so far, I’ve resisted the siren call of real time, face-to-face communiqué. And I believe my rationale is sound: I’m lazy.
rolfcopter

Given my social circle, it would probably be laborious (and aggravating) for me to attempt to migrate my friends and coworkers into fully adopting a telepresence. And frankly, call me old fashioned, but I still prefer to be texted, emailed, and, depending on how serious the circumstance, (gasp!) called.

However, there is one desirable consumer segment that is already embracing (and taking ownership of) the telepresence platform as a viable platform for communication: teens.
Here’s Looking at You, Kids

The youth market- which I’d like to think I’m not completely removed from- is unique. They’ve never known a life without some form of digital-enabled, hyper-communication. And because of that, the rapid adoption (and abandonment) of new technology is second-nature to them.

Recently, I was chatting with a colleague who mentioned that her daughter (and all her friends) took to ooVoo every night to socialize.

Wait, ooVoo, the video conferencing software that I use to connect with coworkers is being used by 13 year-olds to casually shoot the breeze? Seems like overkill. (Almost as absurd as anyone other than doctors using pagers for communication!)

But upon further inspection, maybe I’m just a Luddite. In March, Ad Age reported that “although video calling and video instant messaging are still a small fraction of overall internet traffic, video communications will increase tenfold from 2008-2013.” Skype, ooVoo, iChat, GChat, Stickam and a growing number of other services have created a playing field for a new culture of communication that will likely have far-reaching cultural implications.

Teens’ use of “video chatting” might be the catalyst that precipitates the widespread adoption of the technology. If text messaging, IM, and prior to that, beepers are any indication, teens tend to sit at the vanguard of electronic communication, not only creating the credibility and initial user base that allows the critical mass to migrate, but also defining the rules of engagement (lexicon, etiquette) for the new platform.

The question is, however, how can brands offer value by engaging consumers through this platform-from-the-future?


For some reason, I have never fully adopted the use of video conferencing.

In my defense, I think I’ve been pretty accepting when it comes to incorporating new technologies and communications platforms in my daily routine.  Over the years, I’ve expanded from AIM and AOL chatrooms to GChat and message boards, from (gulp!) MiGente to Facebook and Twitter. But, so far, I’ve resisted the siren call of real time, face-to-face communiqué.  And I believe my rationale is sound: I’m lazy.
rolfcopter

Given my social circle, it would probably be laborious (and aggravating) for me to attempt to migrate my friends and coworkers into fully adopting a telepresence. And frankly, call me old fashioned, but I still prefer to be texted, emailed, and, depending on how serious the circumstance, (gasp!) called.

However, there is one desirable consumer segment that is already embracing (and taking ownership of) the telepresence platform as a viable platform for communication: teens.

Here’s Looking at You, Kids

The youth market- which I’d like to think I’m not completely removed from- is unique.  They’ve never known a life without some form of digital-enabled, hyper-communication.  And because of that, the rapid adoption (and abandonment) of new technology is second-nature to them.

Recently, I was chatting with a colleague who mentioned that her daughter (and all her friends) took to ooVoo every night to socialize.

Wait, ooVoo, the video conferencing software that I use to connect with coworkers is being used by 13 year-olds to casually shoot the breeze? Seems like overkill.  (Almost as absurd as anyone other than doctors using pagers for communication!)

But upon further inspection, maybe I’m just a Luddite. In March, Ad Age reported that “although video calling and video instant messaging are still a small fraction of overall internet traffic, video communications will increase tenfold from 2008-2013.”  Skype, ooVoo, iChat, GChat, Stickam and a growing number of other services have created a playing field for a new culture of communication that will likely have far-reaching cultural implications.

Teens’ use of  “video chatting” might be the catalyst that precipitates the widespread adoption of the technology.  If text messaging, IM, and prior to that, beepers are any indication, teens tend to sit at the vanguard of electronic communication, not only creating the credibility and initial user base that allows the critical mass to migrate, but also defining the rules of engagement (lexicon, etiquette) for the new platform.

The question is, however, how can brands offer value by engaging consumers through this platform-from-the-future? Leer más “The Revolution Will Be Telepresenced”