10 herramientas de software libre para gestionar proyectos | Bitelia.com


Avatar de Marilí­n Gonzalo | Bitelia

Para trabajar de forma profesional en un proyecto, muchas veces necesitamos algo más que una lista de tareas, y es el momento de buscar una solución en software, tanto si es un trabajo que vamos a llevar a cabo solos como si hay otras personas en el equipo. Si los clientes son varios, entonces ya es imprescindible encontrar algún buen programa de gestión de proyectos, estable pero también flexible. Los programas desoftware libre son ideales porque además de ser potentes, cuentan detrás con una comunidad de desarrolladores y pueden hacernos ahorrar bastante en costos.

Hemos hecho una lista de herramientas de software libre abiertas y disponibles, así cualquiera que lo necesite pueda tener a mano un sitio donde buscar y probar distintos programas que han sido recomendados por sus usuarios. Si usan otras y les parece que deberíamos conocerlas, no olviden mencionarlas en los comentarios.

colabtive: A los fans de Basecamp les gustará esta herramienta, porque es la alternativa open source a herramientas propietarias como esta. Permite importar desde Basecamp e incluye funciones similares como la gestión de diferentes proyectos, los Milestones y las listas de tareas. También mide el tiempo dedicado a las tareas, emite informes y cuenta con varios plugins para extender sus funciones. Sólo en inglés.

Project HQ: También similar a Basecamp, Project HQ está construido sobre Python, Pylons y SQLAlchemy, y su base de datos es totalmente independiente. Gestiona distintas compañías, miembros y proyectos y cuenta con minestrones y listas de tareas. Es configurable visualmente usando CSS.

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Bloggers detained … but others write on

(CNN) — Across the world blogging has become a way of spreading your message but for some that message can cost them their freedom.

From Iran to Vietnam, bloggers take risks going online to spread news and views authorities have no wish to see or hear.

In Egypt, Wael Abbas is an award wining blogger and international human rights activist recognized for his work by institutions such as the Human Rights Watch and Reporters without Borders.

His blog Misr Digital which translates as “Egyptian Awareness” gained worldwide attention for video posts of torture sessions in prisons, mass sexual harassment of women, and police brutality in the streets of Egypt.

“In oppressive regimes you get both sides of the story from bloggers, who can tackle taboo issues such as torture, homosexuality, and corruption. Bloggers are a necessity in countries where media is not free; they are the main source of free information,” Abbas said.



(CNN)
— Across the world blogging has become a way of spreading your message but for some that message can cost them their freedom.

From Iran to Vietnam, bloggers take risks going online to spread news and views authorities have no wish to see or hear.

In Egypt, Wael Abbas is an award wining blogger and international human rights activist recognized for his work by institutions such as the Human Rights Watch and Reporters without Borders.

His blog Misr Digital which translates as “Egyptian Awareness” gained worldwide attention for video posts of torture sessions in prisons, mass sexual harassment of women, and police brutality in the streets of Egypt.

“In oppressive regimes you get both sides of the story from bloggers, who can tackle taboo issues such as torture, homosexuality, and corruption. Bloggers are a necessity in countries where media is not free; they are the main source of free information,” Abbas said.

We refused to let them destroy us
–Wael Abbas
Leer más “Bloggers detained … but others write on”

Craigslist Pulls ‘Censored’ Label From Sex Ads Area

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Is Craigslist’s adult services section gone for good?

The classifieds site, which shut down the sex ads section last weekend and replaced the link with a “censored” bar, has now removed that label. The sex ads section is still gone. Craigslist has refused to discuss the move and on Thursday, Susan MacTavish Best, its spokeswoman, would not say anything beyond confirming that the ads were still blocked.

Analysts had speculated that Craigslist used the word “censored” to make a statement. Though Craigslist is not legally responsible for what people post on its site, state attorneys general and advocacy groups have been pressuring the company to shut down the adult services section. But analysts also said that the outpouring of attention that Craigslist’s sex ads have received in recent days would make it very difficult for the site to bring back the ads.


Image representing Craigslist as depicted in C...

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Is Craigslist’s adult services section gone for good?

The classifieds site, which shut down the sex ads section last weekend and replaced the link with a “censored” bar, has now removed that label. The sex ads section is still gone. Craigslist has refused to discuss the move and on Thursday, Susan MacTavish Best, its spokeswoman, would not say anything beyond confirming that the ads were still blocked.

Analysts had speculated that Craigslist used the word “censored” to make a statement. Though Craigslist is not legally responsible for what people post on its site, state attorneys general and advocacy groups have been pressuring the company to shut down the adult services section. But analysts also said that the outpouring of attention that Craigslist’s sex ads have received in recent days would make it very difficult for the site to bring back the ads. Leer más “Craigslist Pulls ‘Censored’ Label From Sex Ads Area”

Is YouTube Citizen Journalism Desensitizing Us?

YouTube has recently become one of the most popular mediums for spreading the word about human rights violations around the globe, from the death of female protester Neda Agha-Soltan after last year’s election in Iran to police brutality in Zanzibar and human rights abuses in Russian prisons. But while this influx of amateur footage of human rights violations is certainly giving us a better idea of the inhumanity going on in other parts of the world, I can’t help but wonder whether these snuff-like videos aren’t desensitizing us to these atrocities. The more videos we see of people being killed, beaten and treated like animals the less shocking it is. Is human rights citizen journalism desensitizing us?

YouTube has been working on a blog series with WITNESS, human rights video advocacy and training organization, and in their most recent post they ask YouTubers for their opinions on human rights in a series of questions. One of the most interesting questions that they ask regards our desensitization to human rights footage:

“In the past, in many countries, human rights images were largely filtered through the news media. But today, nearly everyone has seen a video or photo on the Internet that has made them aware of injustice. With access to these kinds of images getting easier, and more stories appearing from more places, the sheer quantity of this content risks either overwhelming viewers, or desensitizing us to its value. How do you think people can stay alert to the power of these images without becoming immune to them?”


Posted by Megan O’Neill

Every Human Has RightsYouTube has recently become one of the most popular mediums for spreading the word about human rights violations around the globe, from the death of female protester Neda Agha-Soltan after last year’s election in Iran to police brutality in Zanzibar and human rights abuses in Russian prisons.  But while this influx of amateur footage of human rights violations is certainly giving us a better idea of the inhumanity going on in other parts of the world, I can’t help but wonder whether these snuff-like videos aren’t desensitizing us to these atrocities.  The more videos we see of people being killed, beaten and treated like animals the less shocking it is.  Is human rights citizen journalism desensitizing us?

YouTube has been working on a blog series with WITNESS, human rights video advocacy and training organization, and in their most recent post they ask YouTubers for their opinions on human rights in a series of questions.  One of the most interesting questions that they ask regards our desensitization to human rights footage:

“In the past, in many countries, human rights images were largely filtered through the news media.  But today, nearly everyone has seen a video or photo on the Internet that has made them aware of injustice.  With access to these kinds of images getting easier, and more stories appearing from more places, the sheer quantity of this content risks either overwhelming viewers, or desensitizing us to its value.  How do you think people can stay alert to the power of these images without becoming immune to them?” Leer más “Is YouTube Citizen Journalism Desensitizing Us?”

The Most Isolated Man on the Planet. He’s alone in the Brazilian Amazon, but for how long?

A few Brazilians first heard of the lone Indian in 1996, when loggers in the western state of Rondônia began spreading a rumor: A wild man was in the forest, and he seemed to be alone. Government field agents specializing in isolated tribes soon found one of his huts—a tiny shelter of palm thatch, with a mysterious hole dug in the center of the floor. As they continued to search for whoever had built that hut, they discovered that the man was on the run, moving from shelter to shelter, abandoning each hut as soon as loggers—or the agents—got close. No other tribes in the region were known to live like he did, digging holes inside of huts—more than five feet deep, rectangular, serving no apparent purpose. He didn’t seem to be a stray castaway from a documented tribe.

Eventually, the agents found the man. He was unclothed, appeared to be in his mid-30s (he’s now in his late 40s, give or take a few years), and always armed with a bow-and-arrow. Their encounters fell into a well-worn pattern: tense standoffs, ending in frustration or tragedy. On one occasion, the Indian delivered a clear message to one agent who pushed the attempts at contact too far: an arrow to the chest.

Peaceful contact proved elusive, but those encounters helped the agents stitch together a profile of a man with a calamitous past. In one jungle clearing they found the bulldozed ruins of several huts, each featuring the exact same kind of hole—14 in all—that the lone Indian customarily dug inside his dwellings. They concluded that it had been the site of his village, and that it had been destroyed by land-hungry settlers in early 1996.

Those kinds of clashes aren’t unheard of: Brazil’s 1988 Constitution gave Indians the legal right to the land they have traditionally occupied, which created a powerful incentive for settlers to chase uncontacted tribes off of any properties they might be eyeing for development. Just months before the agents began tracking the lone Indian, they made peaceful first contact with two other tribes that lived in the same region. One tribe, the Akuntsu, had been reduced to just six members. The rest of the tribe, explained the chief, had been killed during a raid by men with guns and chainsaws.

If you go to Rondônia today, none of the local landowners will claim any knowledge of these anecdotal massacres. But most aren’t afraid to loudly voice their disdain over the creation of reserves for such small tribes. They will say that it’s absurd to save 31 square miles of land for the benefit of just one man, when a productive ranch potentially could provide food for thousands.

That argument wilts under scrutiny, in part because thousands of square miles of already-cleared forest throughout the Amazon remain barren wastelands, undeveloped. The only economic model in which increased production absolutely depends on increased clearing is a strictly local one. The question of who’d benefit from clearing the land versus preserving it boils down to two people: the individual developer and the lone Indian.

The government agents know this, which is why they view the protection of the lone tribesman as a question human rights, not economics.


By Monte Reel

Yahoo maps image. Click image to expand.The most isolated man on the planet will spend tonight inside a leafy palm-thatch hut in the Brazilian Amazon. As always, insects will darn the air. Spider monkeys will patrol the treetops. Wild pigs will root in the undergrowth. And the man will remain a quietly anonymous fixture of the landscape, camouflaged to the point of near invisibility.

That description relies on a few unknowable assumptions, obviously, but they’re relatively safe. The man’s isolation has been so well-established—and is so mind-bendingly extreme—that portraying him silently enduring another moment of utter solitude is a practical guarantee of reportorial accuracy.

He’s an Indian, and Brazilian officials have concluded that he’s the last survivor of an uncontacted tribe. They first became aware of his existence nearly 15 years ago and for a decade launched numerous expeditions to track him, to ensure his safety, and to try to establish peaceful contact with him. In 2007, with ranching and logging closing in quickly on all sides, government officials declared a 31-square-mile area around him off-limits to trespassing and development.

It’s meant to be a safe zone. He’s still in there. Alone.

History offers few examples of people who can rival his solitude in terms of duration and degree. The one that comes closest is the “Lone Woman of San Nicolas”—an Indian woman first spotted by an otter hunter in 1853, completely alone on an island off the coast of California. Catholic priests who sent a boat to fetch her determined that she had been alone for as long as 18 years, the last survivor of her tribe. But the details of her survival were never really fleshed out. She died just weeks after being “rescued.”

Certainly other last tribesmen and -women have succumbed unobserved throughout history, the world unaware of their passing. But what makes the man in Brazil unique is not merely the extent of his solitude or the fact that the government is aware of his existence. It’s the way they’ve responded to it. Leer más “The Most Isolated Man on the Planet. He’s alone in the Brazilian Amazon, but for how long?”

80 Controversial and Disturbing Print Ads


Let’s look at these advertisements objectively with an open and analytical mind and appreciate the creativity that went into it. One has to wonder how the creative directors and designers came up with these concepts. What was the thought process and rational behind their radical ideas? Was there prior censorship and surveying done in a control group before the decision to go ahead with the advert was made? No matter the response, such advertisements do exist and are on the rise. Does challenging the norm by being controversial and extreme payoff by leaving an impact or making an impression on viewers? This is an answer we’d love to find out.

Here are 80 controversial advertisements that challenge the boundaries of what is socially and morally acceptable with the use of dark humour and shock tactics. These print advertisements often use gore, vulgarity, sex, violence, and sometimes religion to promote their products or bring across the organisations’ message. These adverts either challenge social, political or moral propriety. That is why some of these advertisements are banned in certain countries. Although the use of such adverts can be effective, it is not for the faint of heart or small of mind. Not everyone can appreciate the beauty in such clever and deliberate ugliness.

Ariel: Pervert
Ariel

Amnesty International: Archery
Archery

AMAM – Association of Women Against Genital Mutilation: Plastic doll
Amam

Alka-Seltzer: New Year
Alka Seltzer

Alac: Kitchen
Alac

Ace: Tarantula
Ace

A Bela Sintra: Foot
A Bela Sintra Foot

WWF: Blood
WWF

Amnesty International: Red Little Tender
Violence Against Women

Vergessen ist ansteckend: Tub
Vergessen

TMF: Army
TMF Leer más “80 Controversial and Disturbing Print Ads”