How to Benchmark Your Browser for HTML 5

The current set of Web browsers–Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer, and Safari–support assorted standards, including HTML 5, the latest version of HyperText Markup Language. HTML 5 is an ambitious extension of HTML, incorporating an array of features. The standard is still in flux, however, and the World Wide Web Consortium hasn’t finalized it yet. Some of the important new features in HTML 5 include canvas rendering, tighter integration of SVG (scalable vector graphics), and video and audio tags. These new elements are specifically designed to make it easier for Web developers to present and manage multimedia content. What HTML 5 currently doesn’t have is a built-in standard way to handle 3D graphics.

Whenever new, competing platforms emerge, it’s natural to try to compare their performance. After all, users want the most robust and most responsive environment for running their applications, whether those apps are for productivity, entertainment, or education. The problem is that Web applications themselves are in a state of flux, as is the state of benchmarking Web browsers.

What I’m going to cover in this article won’t tell you what the fastest browser is, nor what the best hardware might be for those browsers–that will come later. Today, I’ll dive into the complexities of benchmarking browsers, look at a few examples of benchmarks, and help you understand where performance testing currently stands when it comes to these new virtual platforms. By the end of this article, you will know how to benchmark and optimize your browser for HTML 5 applications.


Via Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

Modern Web browsers on both mobile devices and PCs now support HTML 5, including HTML 5 canvas rendering. We show you how to get the most out of your browser with a little testing and tweaking.

Contemporary browsers are much more than just a window into the World Wide Web: Browser developers have turned the software into sophisticated application platforms in their own right. But browsers are not the same as hardware platforms–rather, they function as virtual environments accessible from a variety of platforms. For example, you can have Google’s Chrome browser on Windows, Mac OS, Linux, and Android devices.

The current set of Web browsers–Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer, and Safari–support assorted standards, including HTML 5, the latest version of HyperText Markup Language. HTML 5 is an ambitious extension of HTML, incorporating an array of features. The standard is still in flux, however, and the World Wide Web Consortium hasn’t finalized it yet. Some of the important new features in HTML 5 include canvas rendering, tighter integration of SVG (scalable vector graphics), and video and audio tags. These new elements are specifically designed to make it easier for Web developers to present and manage multimedia content. What HTML 5 currently doesn’t have is a built-in standard way to handle 3D graphics.

Whenever new, competing platforms emerge, it’s natural to try to compare their performance. After all, users want the most robust and most responsive environment for running their applications, whether those apps are for productivity, entertainment, or education. The problem is that Web applications themselves are in a state of flux, as is the state of benchmarking Web browsers.

What I’m going to cover in this article won’t tell you what the fastest browser is, nor what the best hardware might be for those browsers–that will come later. Today, I’ll dive into the complexities of benchmarking browsers, look at a few examples of benchmarks, and help you understand where performance testing currently stands when it comes to these new virtual platforms. By the end of this article, you will know how to benchmark and optimize your browser for HTML 5 applications. Leer más “How to Benchmark Your Browser for HTML 5”

Flash-centric misconceptions of HTML5

Technical overview of HTML 5

The fifth major revision to the language of the World Wide Web can be written in both HTML and XML syntax and has been specially integrated with detailed processing models to facilitate interoperable implementations, and at the same time improve markup for HTML documents and web applications. Its core purpose is to solve cross-platform dependency in the web industry.

If all this sounds Greek to you, let’s break down what HTML5 does into a language that is easily understood, without getting into the complex technicalities:

HTML5 is an updated markup language that follows XML standards.
The idea behind HTML5 is to ensure consistency in the performance and output of web products on all operating systems including iOS, Android, Windows amongst many others.
Most common misconceptions regarding HTML are design centric. So, let’s take a look at what is offered by HTML 5 from the design point of view.

Built-in audio and video support that helps embed media directly into HTML documents has made the use of outside plugins redundant.
HTML5 supports SVG and Canvas elements for animations.
Offers designers a canvas element that facilitates rendering 2D graphics in ‘immediate mode’. This means graphical objects are directly rendered to the display.
Has been developed for creating interactive applications that are content heavy and are not only user-friendly, but also SEO-friendly.


With close to a decade of experience in web design, I have come across plenty of mistaken beliefs about the latest design tools and technologies; but nothing beats the misconceptions surrounding the use of HTML 5.

As developers, we have our own set of misguided beliefs about a certain technology, but as we begin to use that technology we are able to understand what it is all about, its usage, and its scope.

Inspired by certain HTML5 requirements that I have come across through the course of time, I wanted to add my two cents to clear the air on certain aspects of HTML5. Most of the misconceptions surrounding HTML5 are because many people think it’s a replacement for Flash.

At the outset, I would like to make it clear that this is not an HTML5 vs. Flash post. The truth is that one cannot act as the replacement for the other, so there is no ‘us vs. them’ battle. But, therein is the nub of the misconceptions. The problem is that people believe HTML5 is an enhanced alternative to Flash. All misconceptions are a result of this thinking.

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