Teens And Tech: Why Marketers Should Follow Their Lead – thnxz to @cmo_com


For teens, it’s cool to be connected—and connected a lot.
Vía CMO

by Dina Gerdeman Contributing Writer CMO.com
(Abstract)

A study released in March by Wikia and Ipsos MediaCT found that 100 percent of teenagers say they are online for at least an hour per day and nearly half—46 percent—said they are connected to the Web a whopping 10 or more hours per day.

Marketers may want to keep their fingers on the pulse of where teens are choosing to spend those 10 hours a day online because the technology wave young people are riding today could soon become the stuff of everyday life for the rest of us. Plus, the teenage market itself is huge; in the U.S. alone, consumers ages 12 to 17 spent more than $200 billion on products in 2011, according to the consulting firm Packaged Facts.

Full story > here <

“It’s important for marketers to understand what’s happening with this group because these are the future consumers,” said Joe Kessler, president of the Intelligence Group, in an interview with CMO.com. “The trends that emerge from what the youngest consumers are doing tend to spread to the broader population. We’ve got 10-year-olds and 15-year-olds who are the CTOs of their families. They are the influencers helping to educate their parents and grandparents about the use of social media, mobile devices, and other technology.”

So how are teens accessing the Internet and where are they hanging out online for those 10-plus hours a day?

ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS:

  • The trends that emerge from what the youngest consumers are doing tend to spread to the broader population.
  • For teens, bolting to a new place is a very easy thing to do.
  • Marketers should consider the bigger picture of how teens spend time online since those habits could reveal future trends.

Full story > here <

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México: Blockbuster quiere lanzar su servicio de streaming en el país


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A principios de octubre pasado, la cadena Blockbuster reveló que sus planes para competir contra Netflix con su propio servicio de streaming habían pasado a mejor vida, ya que la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones en Estados Unidos retrasó el trámite de autorización solicitado por Dish para utilizar su espacio satelital en la transmisión terrestre de datos y voz; sin embargo, esta situación podría cambiar en México.

“Blockbuster México va a tener una oferta digital en el corto o mediano plazo. En seis meses, aproximadamente”, dijo Edward Argüelles, director general de la firma en el país.

Esta medida podría sólo aparecer exclusivamen6te en la región, ya que según el cabecilla regional de la compañía, la cadena opera de forma separada con respecto a su contraparte en los Estados Unidos. Leer más “México: Blockbuster quiere lanzar su servicio de streaming en el país”

Why Quitting Your Job Might Not Be a Bad Idea


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Have you ever wondered what you could do if you did not have to go to work? Are you unsatisfied with your job or your employer? Sometimes we need to “dump the trash” to make room for new opportunities. So many of us get caught in the daily grind, and we forget what is important to us. Our happiness is just as important if not more important than our finances.

Assess Your Situation

Are you unhappy when you come home from work? If you are, try to understand why you feel the way you do after a day of work. Do you feel passionate about your work? Do you think you could be happier doing something else? Are you making enough money? If you are not passionate about what you are doing in your current profession, it can often mean it is time to start exploring other options.

Dream Big

Too often people do not let themselves dream. They do not want to be unrealistic. What would make you happy? If you have been tied down by the same job for a while you realize how important a change can be for a person.  Allow yourself to explore all options and interests. Perhaps you want a job in a similar field, or maybe you want to change professions completely. It is okay to stay in the same job field, but it is also completely natural to want to explore new opportunities. What would you like to spend the next few years doing? Maybe you have a particular hobby you enjoy doing, and perhaps you would like to do something related to that. Leer más “Why Quitting Your Job Might Not Be a Bad Idea”

“Garden Cities of Tomorrow” by Ebenezer Howard


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Written by Ebenezer Howard and originally published in 1898, the book was titled “To-morrow: A Peaceful Path to Real Reform”. In 1902 it was reprinted as “Garden Cities of To-Morrow”. Howard’s ideas gave rise not only to the garden city movement, but also were the origin of  modern planning concepts such as network urbanism or polycentric cities. Leer más ““Garden Cities of Tomorrow” by Ebenezer Howard”

The Great Depression and the Rise of the Refrigerator


• By  • psmag.com

When I moved to Los Angeles and began my search for an apartment I was a little surprised by the fact that a refrigerator wasn’t included with most of the units I toured. In every other city where I’ve ever lived, the average apartment always included a refrigerator with the cost of rent. I was only looking for a one-bedroom apartment, but I was expecting that this was the norm everywhere for the most basic of apartments.

When I asked the manager of the apartment building I wound up renting from why there was no refrigerator, she explained that the property only supplies “the essentials.” When I pointed out that the building came with an underground parking space, she just stared at me blankly. It was in her silence that I came to understand a subtle difference between Los Angeles and the rest of the country: parking is essential, keeping perishable food fresh is not.

My belief that a refrigerator is an essential part of any home obviously comes from a place of tremendous privilege. For centuries, people have struggled with attempts at keeping food fresh. Only in the 20th century (after the first World War) did American consumers see the arrival of a slick new invention that would dramatically change our relationship with food; how we shopped and how we ate. But somewhat surprisingly, the rapid adoption of the electric refrigerator in American homes has its roots in an unlikely decade: the 1930s.

The Great Depression, despite all the hardships of the American people, would see the meteoric rise of the refrigerator. At the start of the 1930s, just 8 percent of American households owned a mechanical refrigerator. By the end of the decade, it had reached 44 percent. The refrigerator came to be one of the most important symbols of middle class living in the United States. While the upper class rarely interacted with such appliances, given the fact that they had servants, the middle class woman of the 1930s lived in a “servantless household”—a phrase you see repeatedly in scholarship about this era. The refrigerator was tied to one of the most fundamental and unifying of middle class events: the daily family meal. And it was in providing for your family that the refrigerator became a point of pride.

The refrigerator of the 1930s was often the color white, which people associated with cleanliness and proper hygiene. As Shelley Nickles notes in her 2002 paper “Preserving Women: Refrigerator Design as Social Process in the 1930s,” the whiteness of the appliance was supposed to signify that a woman cared about the safety and health of her family:

The refrigerator’s primary function, preserving food, was now linked visually to the responsibilities of the average housewife to provide a clean, safe environment for her family. Contrasting to diverse, localized practices of food preservation and wooden iceboxes kept in service areas and used primarily by servants, these white, steel refrigerators were conceptualized as part of the ordinary kitchen. By buying a white refrigerator and keeping it in the kitchen, the housewife expressed her awareness of modern sanitary and food preservation standard; her ability to keep the refrigerator white and devoid of dirt represented the extent to which she met these standards.

 

The newspapers and magazines of the 1930s…   Leer más “The Great Depression and the Rise of the Refrigerator”

¿Puede la publicidad cambiar el mundo? | via masr.com.mx


MASR

¿Puede la publicidad cambiar el mundo? Según Jeff Rosenblum, co-fundador de la agenciaQuestus, la respuesta es sí; para probar este punto, co-escribió y co-dirigió un documental sobre las marcas que han entendido este poder, crean mejores productos, ayudan al planeta y dicen la verdad en su publicidad.


El documental The Naked Brand, que se presentará este mes en festivales de cine y conferencias de marketing, no presenta a clientes de Questus, pero sí incluye entrevistas a ejecutivos de grandes empresas como UnileverPatagonia,PepsiCo y Zappos, además de personalidades como Shaquille O’Neal.

Todos ellos comparten sus experiencias y filosofía detrás de sus políticas. La tesis del documental es que, en la era de la comunicación y la tecnología, es imposible que una empresa ofrezca un mal producto o incurra en comportamientos poco éticos, porque la gente se dará cuenta eventualmente. Así lo resume Keith Weed, CEO de Unilever: “En el mundo digital, una marca es juzgada por lo que dice, pero también por lo que hace. La publicidad puede presentarle una marca a los consumidores, pero finalmente será juzgada por sus actos”. Leer más “¿Puede la publicidad cambiar el mundo? | via masr.com.mx”