How Much For A Facebook Friend?|vía @cmo_com


While marketers agree on the importance of putting a price tag on social media interactions, they also say the area is wide open to interpretation–and very misunderstood. Heads of marketing from Sears, Kimberly-Clark, Comcast and other brands discuss how they measure social ROI. |

ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Most marketers repeatedly refer to pinning down the real value of Facebook likes, Twitter favorites, and Pinterest pins as the “Holy Grail.”
  • “You don’t understand the true value of a like unless you understand the value of paid media around it.”
  • A click-versus-revenue figure would be a simple answer to the ROI question, but is not necessarily the right answer for top management.

Backtracking Vs. Forecasting
Many marketers analyze effectiveness by looking at before-and-after results of a campaign and then use that to model future efforts. For example, Leer más “How Much For A Facebook Friend?|vía @cmo_com”

Anuncios

Going Viral | via sitepronews.com


sitepronews.com

Going viral is the holy grail of any online ad campaign, or really any effort at online exposure, period. It’s akin to a TV show becoming a hit, or a movie raking in blockbuster gross sales. It can even be compared to a toy or item of clothing becoming the “hot” thing for the season.

So are these all comparable, or really just the same thing?

What exactly is something that’s “gone viral” and why do some things “go viral” while others don’t? Can this be predicted, or is it completely up to a whim or some ethereal “x factor” that some things have and others just don’t?

The Facts of ( Viral ) Life

So what does viral mean? Viral refers to something that self-propagates, or in the marketing sense, something that spreads by word-of-mouth, peer-to-peer, as opposed to strictly from an official advertisement.

Going viral is valuable because the intended audience does all the heavy advertising work for you, ideally at an exponential rate. This saves money and resources in advertising costs and usually means more potent audience penetration; people are more apt to believe their peers than an advertisement.

People like to hear themselves talk, not be talked at. So when someone with similar interests whose opinion you hold in high regard recommends something, you are more likely to follow up on that suggestion than if you received that same call-to-action from some generic public advertisement.

Viral advertising or marketing is any specific advertisement or campaign that is ultimately intended to go viral. Usually these campaigns need to be highly unorthodox or creatively unusual in order for them to virally spread. In fact, many campaigns even appear as “real” or non-commercial in order to gain more viral effect. Leer más “Going Viral | via sitepronews.com”

The Marketer’s Guide to Digg

When content is voted upon by other members of the Digg community (also known as getting diggs or being dugg), it gets the chance to be discovered not only by your own followers, but also the community at large by making it to the Holy Grail – the Digg homepage (or when you’re logged in, the Top News section). While the exact formula to what gets on the homepage is a mystery, the general theory is that a submission which receives a high number of votes within a short amount of time will likely make it to the top of the list.


http://blog.kissmetrics.com/digg-marketing-guide/

While Digg, formerly one of the top social voting sites on the Internet, lost a lot of its luster since their major update last year to version four, they still receive at least 2.5 million visitors per month in the US alone and have an Alexa rating of 167, PageRank of 8, and Domain Authority of 100.

Digg is also a little bit more marketing friendly than their main competition Reddit. The following guide will help you learn to use Digg for sharing your awesome content with a larger audience.

How Digg Works

digg.com front page

Members of the Digg community can submit and share content to the Digg network under the main categories of Business, Entertainment, Gaming, Lifestyle, Offbeat, Politics, Science, Sports, Technology, and World News. These broad categories allow for almost any area of content to be submitted. Leer más “The Marketer’s Guide to Digg”

Digg Marketing Guide

Members of the Digg community can submit and share content to the Digg network under the main categories of Business, Entertainment, Gaming, Lifestyle, Offbeat, Politics, Science, Sports, Technology, and World News. These broad categories allow for almost any area of content to be submitted.

When content is voted upon by other members of the Digg community (also known as getting diggs or being dugg), it gets the chance to be discovered not only by your own followers, but also the community at large by making it to the Holy Grail – the Digg homepage (or when you’re logged in, the Top News section). While the exact formula to what gets on the homepage is a mystery, the general theory is that a submission which receives a high number of votes within a short amount of time will likely make it to the top of the list.


http://blog.kissmetrics.com/digg-marketing-guide/
_________________________________________________________________
Image representing Digg as depicted in CrunchBase

digg.com front page

Members of the Digg community can submit and share content to the Digg network under the main categories of Business, Entertainment, Gaming, Lifestyle, Offbeat, Politics, Science, Sports, Technology, and World News. These broad categories allow for almost any area of content to be submitted.

When content is voted upon by other members of the Digg community (also known as getting diggs or being dugg), it gets the chance to be discovered not only by your own followers, but also the community at large by making it to the Holy Grail – the Digg homepage (or when you’re logged in, the Top News section). While the exact formula to what gets on the homepage is a mystery, the general theory is that a submission which receives a high number of votes within a short amount of time will likely make it to the top of the list. Leer más “Digg Marketing Guide”

Thoughts on “Social Marketing to the Business Customer”

Typically, one would assume that B2C companies would be more active on social media than B2B companies; however, Gillin cites that in late 2009, 81 percent of B2B companies maintained company profiles on social networking sites while only 67 percent of B2C companies were doing so. After reading the first chapter of his book, the reasons why seemed obvious.

B2B businesses can thrive on cost-effective social marketing for a number of reasons. First off, it is all about substance. For a company like Dell whose customers are spending millions of dollars in a single sale, there is no need to waste time and money on glitzy consumer profiles, and fancy advertising. Social marketing brings knowledge sharing and expertise to the forefront, which is what B2B customers are really looking for.


451 Marketing prides itself on using inbound marketing solutions for its clients. Likewise, new media guru, author and speaker, Paul Gillin, co-authored his third book titled, Social Marketing to the Business Customer with Eric Schwartzman. This book focuses on the importance of using social marketing to facilitate B2B sales and relationships.

Typically, one would assume that B2C companies would be more active on social media than B2B companies; however, Gillin cites that in late 2009, 81 percent of B2B companies maintained company profiles on social networking sites while only 67 percent of B2C companies were doing so. After reading the first chapter of his book, the reasons why seemed obvious.

B2B businesses can thrive on cost-effective social marketing for a number of reasons. First off, it is all about substance. For a company like Dell whose customers are spending millions of dollars in a single sale, there is no need to waste time and money on glitzy consumer profiles, and fancy advertising. Social marketing brings knowledge sharing and expertise to the forefront, which is what B2B customers are really looking for.

Through a social online presence, B2B companies are able to humanize their brands.  When a customer is having problems with a product, he doesn’t want to waste time waiting for a support hotline. He wants to talk directly to the engineers and designers who will understand his specific needs and tailor advice to his particular situation. Allowing customers and experts to freely discuss a product’s shortcomings, and celebrate its successes creates a succinct community that gives the company a personality, and expresses its values. This is especially important for many B2B companies that might come off as cold, heartless, technology corporations. We’ve all heard about companies’ reputations getting slashed online. by angry customers, which obviously is a scary risk, but Gillin thinks it’s well worth it. By taking the risk to empower customers, the company shows confidence and transparency, and humanizes its brand. Leer más “Thoughts on “Social Marketing to the Business Customer””

Five Unique Calls to Action that Will Make You Click Twice

The call to action is the “Holy Grail” of every marketer. Get it right, and you’re swimming in sales. Get it wrong, and your traffic tends to stagnate. You may get lots of visits, but little to show for it. To help inspire you, here are five unique calls to action that have resulted in everything from millions of subscribers, to millions of dollars in sales.
Address Customer Reluctance Upfront (LightCMS)

LightCMS does this wonderfully, although you have to scroll all the way to the bottom of their page to find it. Their call to action button includes numerous statements that propel the hesitant customer forward: Try it yourself. It’s free. No Commitment. No payment information required. Takes less than 60 seconds.


call-to-action

The call to action is the “Holy Grail” of every marketer.  Get it right, and you’re swimming in sales.  Get it wrong, and your traffic tends to stagnate.  You may get lots of visits, but little to show for it.  To help inspire you, here are five unique calls to action that have resulted in everything from millions of subscribers, to millions of dollars in sales.

Address Customer Reluctance Upfront (LightCMS)

LightCMS does this wonderfully, although you have to scroll all the way to the bottom of their page to find it.  Their call to action button includes numerous statements that propel the hesitant customer forward:  Try it yourself. It’s free. No Commitment. No payment information required. Takes less than 60 seconds.

speaklight call to action example

Think Outside the Rectangle (Storenvy)

Most call to action buttons are simply rectangles, but some of the highest click-through rates have been reported on buttons that break outside the box.  Unusual shapes or even rounded buttons, such as Storenvy’s Join Now, give the appearance of an actual button to be pressed.  With more and more people browsing on touch-screen smart phones, making buttons stand out with a slight beveled edge or shadow gives the appearance of “pressability”.

storenvy call to action example

What Happens After I Push It? (Mozilla Firefox)

As enticing as your graphics look, many people don’t convert because they don’t know what will happen after they click.  One call to action button that solves this issue beautifully is Mozilla Firefox’s own download button.  Not only does it tell you the approximate size of the download, but correctly guesses the language and operating system from the browser you’re currently using. Having a small downward arrow icon beside “Free Download” immediately lets the user know what will happen when they click. Leer más “Five Unique Calls to Action that Will Make You Click Twice”

Experience Trumps Theory: Reviving the Apprenticeship Model

Once upon a time, we learned only by doing. A quality education meant finding an expert to take you under his or her wing. Whether you wanted to be a blacksmith or a shoemaker, the ultimate break was ultimately a relationship. In exchange, your capacity would be stretched. You would learn in real-time, soaking up the knowledge through trial and error. You would learn the trade in practice rather than theory. You would also build a network and gain respect based on your performance rather than any sort of degree.This era of apprenticeship is now largely a relic of history. Somewhere along the line we decided to economize and scale education. Given the time-intensive and intimate nature of apprenticeships, we sought to train more people at once with a streamlined curriculum. As we moved more and more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field. We traded experiential learning for a more standardized but less potent education.

I believe the classroom underserves us. We become dissuaded by theoretical lessons, disenchanted teachers, and a reward system that is all about the grade and not at all about the trade. If experiential education is so important, why don’t we give college credits for what happens outside the classroom?

As we moved more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field.

Unfortunately, undergraduate education is centered on the classroom experience and takes extracurricular activities (clubs, etc.) as an
afterthought. Many schools provide credit for internships, but they don’t stress them as an integrated aspect of the overall program. What’s more, the schools usually play little to no role in coordinating the internships, so it’s very hit or miss: A student could have a life-changing experience, or spend a semester fetching coffee and sitting on the sidelines.

Most of the passionate creative people I have met are motivated more by a genuine interest than by money. We are driven by our pursuit of an expertise in what fascinates us. The Holy Grail for most creative careers is becoming a leader in your interests and making an impact. Experiential on-the-job learning is the most natural conduit for developing such an expertise.


Once upon a time, we learned only by doing. A quality education meant finding an expert to take you under his or her wing. Whether you wanted to be a blacksmith or a shoemaker, the ultimate break was ultimately a relationship. In exchange, your capacity would be stretched. You would learn in real-time, soaking up the knowledge through trial and error. You would learn the trade in practice rather than theory. You would also build a network and gain respect based on your performance rather than any sort of degree.This era of apprenticeship is now largely a relic of history. Somewhere along the line we decided to economize and scale education. Given the time-intensive and intimate nature of apprenticeships, we sought to train more people at once with a streamlined curriculum. As we moved more and more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field. We traded experiential learning for a more standardized but less potent education.

I believe the classroom underserves us. We become dissuaded by theoretical lessons, disenchanted teachers, and a reward system that is all about the grade and not at all about the trade. If experiential education is so important, why don’t we give college credits for what happens outside the classroom?

As we moved more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field.

Unfortunately, undergraduate education is centered on the classroom experience and takes extracurricular activities (clubs, etc.) as an
afterthought. Many schools provide credit for internships, but they don’t stress them as an integrated aspect of the overall program. What’s more, the schools usually play little to no role in coordinating the internships, so it’s very hit or miss: A student could have a life-changing experience, or spend a semester fetching coffee and sitting on the sidelines.

Most of the passionate creative people I have met are motivated more by a genuine interest than by money. We are driven by our pursuit of an expertise in what fascinates us. The Holy Grail for most creative careers is becoming a leader in your interests and making an impact.  Experiential on-the-job learning is the most natural conduit for developing such an expertise.
Leer más “Experience Trumps Theory: Reviving the Apprenticeship Model”