Red Bull saca tajada de la tragedia del Titanic y enfurece a las masas – @armandohueso


“…como siempre fueron bastante transgresores, este anuncio originario de Alemania y que se ha adaptado ahora para Reino Unido no iba a ser menos. Eso sí, lo cierto es que quizás la broma se les ha ido un poco de las manos, y es que aprovechar las víctimas que causó el trágico hundimiento del Titanic para anunciarse… ¡pues como que no! Tanto es así que son muchos a los que no les ha gustado nada un spot animado que insinúa que con Red Bull todos se habrían salvado. Por supuesto, las quejas no se hicieron esperar “.

http://www.socialunderground.co/red-bull-saca-tajada-de-la-tragedia-del-titanic-y-enfurece-a-las-masas/

Vía GreatAds

Fotografías de la Primera Guerra Mundial en 3D


La gente de A Nerds World — quienes descubrieron la cámara — crearon unos GIF animados que nos permiten darnos una idea de una de las guerras más terribles de la humanidad.


world-war-1-camera[1]

Vía http://anerdsworld.com & fayerwayer.com
Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers every time I place a glass slide into the 3D stereo viewer. Only at A Nerd’s World 986 Bathurst street can you see the 3D stereo camera, viewer, and actual World War I slides in person – leaving you with an experience you’ll never forget.

 

British War Memorial Incorporates QR Codes – thnxz to @QReateAndTrack


According to an article from the Huffington Post, “special panels have been installed at First World War memorials enabling the public to use their smartphones to learn about the history of the service personnel who lost their lives.”

Over 100 panels are being places across the UK as educational tools to shed light on the events of WWI. The article goes on to say that, “when scanned with a smartphone, the QR code provides access to information including personal stories of some of the casualties buried or commemorated at the memorial.”

Roughly 100 years after the first World War, this QR Code campaign is meant to offer an effective and long-lasting educational facet to the war memorials. Prince Edward was quoted as saying, “it is a powerful means of combining traditional methods with new technology to ensure we never forget.”

These efforts by the British government signal more widespread acceptance for QR Codes and various mobile technologies – a bridge from historic events to our smartphones.

See more practical uses of QR Codes in the Wild >>>

Creating Exciting And Unusual Visual Hierarchies // thnxz smashingmagazine.com – @smashingmag


Layout, for both print and screen, is one of the most important aspects of graphic design. Designs that extend across multiple pages or screens, whether containing large or small amounts of type, must be carefully controlled in a way that is enticing and is easy for all to access.

Creating Exciting And Unusual Visual Hierarchies With Typography

By 

Careful control of visual hierarchy is a key aspect of the design decisions we have to consider. In this article, we will look at how frequently type needs to be broken down into different levels, such as topic, importance and tone of voice.

Read more…

L.U.C 39/89


just4inspiration

The project “To Understand Poland 39-89″ is a concept album by the Polish composer, songwriter, activist, and producer Łukasz Rostowski, aka L.U.C. The record is delineated by two very important dates: the year of the outbreak of World War II, and the collapse of totalitarian political systems.

Source: L.U.C 39/89 

Don’t Let Meetings Suck Your Time


 |  | inc.com

Six reasons why I hate meetings, and what you can do to make them more efficient

Employee sleeping during meeting, man in pink shirt and glasses

 

I was recently out to lunch with a few colleagues who work at a very cool company. The CEO of their company had left, and the second in command had taken over. They like her, but they said the number of meetings they’re required to go to now has doubled.

They were describing my hell.

Now, I don’t think that meetings are completely useless. But I do think that most companies have useless meetings, including my own. And the people at my company, VerticalResponse, will tell you that they know how I feel.

Why do I hate meetings? Let me count the ways. Leer más “Don’t Let Meetings Suck Your Time”

Timeline del HTML5 #infografia #infographic #internet |


 

TICs y Formación

Infografía con el Timeline del HTML5.

 

Don’t Turn Off The Internet We Have A Revolution | Jeffbullas.com


Written by Lisa Galarneau | jeffbullas.com

One reader commented that in my recent post about our social [media] revolution in the Cloud, I didn’t mention Egypt, Libya, etc. etc. or any of the other populaces who are using their knowledge of new media as a powerful weapon in democracy.Dont Turn Off The Internet We Have A Revolution

It seems a long time ago now, but I was once a linguist in the U.S. Army.  Russian.  The Cold War.  One of my potential jobs would be ‘psychological operations’ and also involved Airborne training, so I could more readily distribute fliers and pamphlets.  Propaganda is a popular device, and something to be wary of, yet we find ourselves awash in it continuously: from governments to corporations to teachers and parents who decide (often based on so-called expert opinion) what is right and good for everyone.  Or at least, in line with their own agendas for you.  I also lived in Chile under Pinochet in the late 1980s… one state-run tv channel and only an old-fashioned two-way radio patched through to landline phones for communication back home.  Information is life-blood to me, as a node in the network, so much so that I literally feel like a limb is cut off when I am denied access for too long.

Information as a Mechanism for Social Transformation

There is a long history of using information as a mechanism for social transformation.  Margaret Sanger, who founded Planned Parenthood, fought epic battles with the American postal service for the crime of distributing information pamphlets helping women understand birth control options, particularly the new-fangled French diaphragms (she later married a mega millionaire and hired a scientist to make her the magic ‘pill’ that we now take so for granted).  World War II was a major information war, before we had memes to understand it at all.  Telegraph, radio and telephone services had been flourishing for some time.  The Nazis targeted intellectuals of many persuasions, sometimes singling them out based on the eye-glasses they wore to assist with their myopia (itself an adaptation that is selected for in families that read a lot).  The Japanese had their own radio station blasting the South Pacific (Tokyo Rose) with their distorted claims and barely disguised imperialist agenda.  Voice of America responded with its own conversations, and continues to be a major force in communicating democratic possibilities (at least our variety), even now. The Soviet Union fell because of Mikhail Gorbachev’s reforms.  Glasnost (open-ness) and perestroika(transformation) edicts were issued as a way to pull the Soviet Union our from behind the iron curtain that kept it economically and culturally stultified for so long.  The burden of knowledge and ramifications of transparency were too much for the early 20th century has-beens (the ‘Communist’ revolution in Russia occurred in 1917). Leer más “Don’t Turn Off The Internet We Have A Revolution | Jeffbullas.com”

Why Innovations Are Arguments

How can a company “get it”? The only way is to hang out with people obsessed with some conclusion about empowering the human experience. To understand early the empowerment that personal computing represented, one would have had to hang out with the members of the Homebrew Computer Club, which spawned Apple Inc. along with about 26 other companies. Similarly, to understand what the empowerment of the automobile would mean, one would have had to hang out with those who made up the inner circle of the early Detroit auto industry. To “get it” means having both the staunchness and the humility to join the dialogue and contribute something — hopefully, an original argument — to the debate; and, if a company cannot contribute even a flawed, or rough, but original argument to the debate, then it can never “get it.”
A company has to do more than look for applications of its technology, acquire technology or just make knock-offs. It has to own a paradigm — a conclusion to an innovation argument. Every business must understand how what it is doing empowers humans. This, plus operational excellence, can make a company almost unstoppable.


 

 

http://sloanreview.mit.edu/
By Randall S. Wright 

Too many executives confuse what an innovation is with what an innovation would do for them if they had one. The solution? Think of innovation as an if-then argument.

ATTEND ALMOST ANY conference on innovation, and one will hear someone in the audience ask, “Yes, but how are you defining ‘innovation’?” Why is there no clear, shared meaning of “innovation”? I believe it is because most executives confuse what an innovation actually is with what an innovation would do for them if they had one. For example, most companies think of an “innovation” as something that wins a sale with a better solution, increases revenue or takes market share from a competitor. But those aren’t definitions of innovation. They’re outcomes executives would like to get from innovation.

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates at the fifth D: All ...

The problem is a serious one, not the least because companies send engineers, “technology entrepreneurs” and “technology scouts” in search of innovations when a shared understanding of what they are looking for may not exist across the organization’s people and functions or between “scouts” and managers. More significantly, to “innovate” means to “regenerate” — and most companies decline or fail because they fail to regenerate.

I propose that all true innovations are arguments. By this I mean that all innovations are composed of three elements: a proposition and a conclusion linked by an inference. I further propose that this is not merely a convenient or workable definition that covers most instances of innovation. Far from it: Stating that innovations are arguments is not just stating a definition — it is an identity, an equality. Innovation = Argument.

Let me explain. When the late Steven Jobs went to Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center in December 1979 to kick around the lab to see what was up, he made an argument — an innovation. He stumbled on a proposition — the graphical user interface — and inferred that this interface would be the way that everyone would experience computing. Jobs later told Rolling Stone, “Within 10 minutes, it was obvious that every computer would work this way someday. You knew it with every bone in your body.” Steve Jobs was an innovator because he could make inferences between technology propositions and conclusions about human experience. Leer más “Why Innovations Are Arguments”

Guía de estilo para las nuevas páginas de marcas en Facebook


Medición de Churn Rate en negocios no “opt-out”

Un buen ejemplo es un sitio de comunidad, digamos que queremos medir el churn rate de una comunidad en particular, ¿Cómo podríamos determinar que un usuario nos está abandonando? O sea, el opt-out en una newsletter no es Churn, cierto? El punto es que en una comunidad el usuario nunca dice”Me estoy yendo de tu comunidad!”, entonces…en que momento decimos, este usuario es parte del Churn?

Seguramente debe haber muchas formas, yo voy a contarles la mía. Fisgoneen la base de datos tratando de identificar en que periodo el 80% de los que se fueron ya no vuelven más (o el número más cercano), recuerden que todo lo que pueden saber sobre el futuro está relacionado con el pasado. Entonces, digamos que empezamos a revisar nuestra base de “Conocimiento” desde February 2011 (el año pasado). En enero 100 personas se loguearon en el sitio y luego no lo hicieron en Febrero. Desde ahora, tomaremos estos como nuestra población de análisis.


http://analytics20.org

El Churn Rate (también llamado attrition rate) es una métrica muy útil, que mide el número de individuos o items ingresando o egresando de un conjunto en un período de tiempo específico. El Churn rate, cuando es aplicado a una base de datos de usuarios, se refiere a la proporción de clientes contractuales o subscriptores que dejan a un proveedor en un período de tiempo determinado. Es un potencial indicador de insatisfacción de clientes, ofertas más baratas o mejores de un competidor, acciones de venta o marketing más exitosas por parte de la competencia, u otras razones relacionadas con el ciclo de vida de clientes (o customer life cycle) (Wikipedia).

Churn Rate in Communities

Entonces si trabajas con o en una celco (empresa que provee servicios de telefonía móvil) contabilizarás el Churn Rate como la cantidad de clientes que cancelan sus planes en un momento determinado. Simple y dulce :-)

Ahora bien, nuestro amigo el Beto “Albert” Einstein una vez dijo “En teoría, teoría y práctica son lo mismo, en la práctica no”. Así que vayamos a uno de esos casos donde no es lo mismo, uno de esos casos poco dulces y sexys.

Un buen ejemplo es un sitio de comunidad, digamos que queremos medir el churn rate de una comunidad en particular, ¿Cómo podríamos determinar que un usuario nos está abandonando? O sea, el opt-out en una newsletter no es Churn, cierto? El punto es que en una comunidad el usuario nunca dice”Me estoy yendo de tu comunidad!”, entonces…en que momento decimos, este usuario es parte del Churn? Leer más “Medición de Churn Rate en negocios no “opt-out””

¿Cómo hacer blackout de un sitio (o poner un sitio en mantenimiento) y no salir perjudicado en SEO?

Según comenta Pierre Far en su perfil de Google+, la forma correcta es mediante un 503. Cuando uno ingresa en una página web que no existe, el servidor entrega un 404 (el famoso 404 o “la página no ha sido encontrada”). Un 404 significa que la página que se está solicitando no está disponible en el servidor (porque no existe o fué eliminada). Así como existe el 404, existe el 503 que significa que la página a la que se intentó acceder se encuentra temporalmente deshabilitada por sobrecarga del servidor o por tareas de mantenimiento. Entonces cuando GoogleBot (u otro robot) intenta acceder al sitio, se encuentra con esta instrucción y no indexa la página en cuestión.


Se suele confundir el fin con el medio. Mejorar el posicionamiento ante palabras clave relevantes nunca es el fin, sino el medio para poder alcanzar un objetivo que es el de generar negocios.

http://emilianoelias.com
Escrito por: Emiliano

Muchos son los sitios que quieren adherirse al famoso blackout para manifestarse en contra de la ley de SOPA. Esto implica “apagar” el sitio durante 24hs para que la gente entre en conciencia de lo que la ley podría llegar a hacer si se aprobase. No vamos a debatir sobre esta ley porque no es el objetivo de este sitio, pero vamos a ver como podemos hacer un blackout sin que salgamos perjudicados en términos de SEO.

 

La problemática radica en que hacer un blackout implica hacer que el sitio esté inaccesible durante un período de tiempo. Y esto puede perjudicarnos ya que GoogleBot puede querer indexar nuestro sitio, y al intentarlo, se encuentra con una página que muestra un mensaje y ningún link hacia el resto de nuestro sitio. Esto podría llegar a alertar a Google de alguna manera resultando en algún tipo de penalización (mínima, pero penalización al fin). Leer más “¿Cómo hacer blackout de un sitio (o poner un sitio en mantenimiento) y no salir perjudicado en SEO?”

20 anuncios inspirados en Albert Einstein: publicidad con mucho “genio”

Tal día como hoy, el 14 de marzo de 1879, nacía el Ulm (Alemania) el que está considerado como el científico más importante del siglo XX: Albert Einstein. En su día, Einstein revolucionó por completo la física con su famosa teoría de la relatividad. Y 133 años después de su nacimiento, sigue inspirando a la gente, y no sólo desde el ámbito de la física, sino también desde la publicidad. La imagen de Einstein ha sido utilizada como reclamo publicitario en los últimos años por múltiples marcas.


http://www.marketingdirecto.com

1Tal día como hoy, el 14 de marzo de 1879, nacía el Ulm (Alemania) el que está considerado como el científico más importante del siglo XX: Albert Einstein. En su día, Einstein revolucionó por completo la física con su famosa teoría de la relatividad. Y 133 años después de su nacimiento, sigue inspirando a la gente, y no sólo desde el ámbito de la física, sino también desde la publicidad. La imagen de Einstein ha sido utilizada como reclamo publicitario en los últimos años por múltiples marcas.

Quizás el “cameo” publicitario más famoso protagonizado por Einstein fue el la campaña “Think Different”, lanzada por Apple en el año 1997. Pero hay muchos más. A continuación, les mostramos algunos de ellos >>> Leer más “20 anuncios inspirados en Albert Einstein: publicidad con mucho “genio””

Clients, the Web and the Big Misconception

Pretty ambiguous title isn’t it? That’s entirely intentional, because the topic of this particular article is something that a lot of web designers seem to hate talking about.

But, now that I’ve got you here hopefully you’ll stick around, so I’ll let the cat out of the bag (so to speak). In this article we’re going to be talking about Web 2.0.

Wait! Don’t run away! This isn’t the sort of article that’s going to round up eight bazillion awesome examples of Web 2.0 designs, or a tutorial that’s going to try to teach you how to replicate some overused and increasingly outdated design element. No, I’m going to tackle the issue head on and in a way that I hope will actual be useful for you. Why? Because we can’t simply ignore Web 2.0 (as much as we may want to).

The term is out there, and has permeated far beyond the borders of the design community and into the mind of the larger public.

it has also permeated into the minds of your clients and potential clients.

That means it has also permeated into the minds of your clients and potential clients.

Here’s a case in point. The other day I was communicating with a new prospect about possibly designing a website and all the things that it would entail. We had exchanged a few emails already when that dreaded question that so many web designers hate to hear came up: will the site design be in 2.0? As a designer/developer, this kind of thing generally and predictably draws a plaintive groan from my lips. Images of strong gradients, big bold stripes, glossy buttons and overused reflections dance like tiny, trendy goblins in my mind.

Later, when I offered my initial proposal for the website, I indicated that I would code it all in XHTML 1.0 and CSS3. I didn’t really expect the client to understand exactly what that meant, but it’s just one of my standard practices to include those kind of technical details, just to make sure that I’ve covered all the bases.

As you can imagine, the client came back and asked: Will the site be done in XHTML 2.0? Based on the previous version-based question, I was reasonably certain that the client was not referring to the W3C’s now defunct concept for XHTML 2 (parts of which have survived in HTML5 – see Jeremy Keith’s wonderfully succinct “A Brief History of Markup” for more details).

No, what the client was actually talking about was his notion of having a website designed to “work” with version 2.0 of the web.
No New Internet

Of course, there is no “new” version of the internet. We’ve introduced some new technologies into the mix, and allowed others to grow and evolve. Our browsers can do a heck of a lot more in terms of rendering sites than they could a decade ago, and the evolution of frameworks like jQuery have allowed for the much broader development of application-like functionality within a document.

But, at its core a website is still very much the kind of thing that I talk about in my recent article “HTML (and CSS) do Not a Website Make” – the unified sum of the various technologies that drive it.

It’s also important to note that there has been no significant change to the underlying structure that drives the internet. To quote Wikipedia on this subject:

Critics of the term claim that “Web 2.0″ does not represent a new version of the World Wide Web at all, but merely continues to use so-called “Web 1.0″ technologies and concepts. First, techniques such as AJAX do not replace underlying protocols like HTTP, but add an additional layer of abstraction on top of them.

Many of the new technologies that we use these days to drive the experience of the internet are not really all that new at all, but are either expanded (such as CSS3 and HTML5) or frameworks that provide a simplified form of access to existing technologies (like jQuery and MooTools do for JavaScript).

As web designers and developers, this probably isn’t anything all that new or revolutionary for us and we understand that the internet that we are using today is precisely the same internet that we were using back in 1995.

Instead of being replaced with a new version, it has simply grown and matured, much the same way my daughter has transformed from a helpless newborn to the energetic two and half year old who is currently pushing my MacBook closed and asking me to come play with her…


www,domain,internet,web,net

Pretty ambiguous title isn’t it? That’s entirely intentional, because the topic of this particular article is something that a lot of web designers seem to hate talking about.

But, now that I’ve got you here hopefully you’ll stick around, so I’ll let the cat out of the bag (so to speak). In this article we’re going to be talking about Web 2.0.

Wait! Don’t run away! This isn’t the sort of article that’s going to round up eight bazillion awesome examples of Web 2.0 designs, or a tutorial that’s going to try to teach you how to replicate some overused and increasingly outdated design element. No, I’m going to tackle the issue head on and in a way that I hope will actual be useful for you. Why? Because we can’t simply ignore Web 2.0 (as much as we may want to).

The term is out there, and has permeated far beyond the borders of the design community and into the mind of the larger public.

it has also permeated into the minds of your clients and potential clients.

That means it has also permeated into the minds of your clients and potential clients.

Here’s a case in point. The other day I was communicating with a new prospect about possibly designing a website and all the things that it would entail. We had exchanged a few emails already when that dreaded question that so many web designers hate to hear came up: will the site design be in 2.0? As a designer/developer, this kind of thing generally and predictably draws a plaintive groan from my lips. Images of strong gradients, big bold stripes, glossy buttons and overused reflections dance like tiny, trendy goblins in my mind.

Later, when I offered my initial proposal for the website, I indicated that I would code it all in XHTML 1.0 and CSS3. I didn’t really expect the client to understand exactly what that meant, but it’s just one of my standard practices to include those kind of technical details, just to make sure that I’ve covered all the bases.

As you can imagine, the client came back and asked: Will the site be done in XHTML 2.0? Based on the previous version-based question, I was reasonably certain that the client was not referring to the W3C’s now defunct concept for XHTML 2 (parts of which have survived in HTML5 – see Jeremy Keith’s wonderfully succinct “A Brief History of Markup” for more details).

No, what the client was actually talking about was his notion of having a website designed to “work” with version 2.0 of the web.

No New Internet

Of course, there is no “new” version of the internet. We’ve introduced some new technologies into the mix, and allowed others to grow and evolve. Our browsers can do a heck of a lot more in terms of rendering sites than they could a decade ago, and the evolution of frameworks like jQuery have allowed for the much broader development of application-like functionality within a document.

But, at its core a website is still very much the kind of thing that I talk about in my recent article “HTML (and CSS) do Not a Website Make” – the unified sum of the various technologies that drive it.

It’s also important to note that there has been no significant change to the underlying structure that drives the internet. To quote Wikipedia on this subject:

Critics of the term claim that “Web 2.0″ does not represent a new version of the World Wide Web at all, but merely continues to use so-called “Web 1.0″ technologies and concepts. First, techniques such as AJAX do not replace underlying protocols like HTTP, but add an additional layer of abstraction on top of them.

Many of the new technologies that we use these days to drive the experience of the internet are not really all that new at all, but are either expanded (such as CSS3 and HTML5) or frameworks that provide a simplified form of access to existing technologies (like jQuery and MooTools do for JavaScript).

As web designers and developers, this probably isn’t anything all that new or revolutionary for us and we understand that the internet that we are using today is precisely the same internet that we were using back in 1995.

Instead of being replaced with a new version, it has simply grown and matured, much the same way my daughter has transformed from a helpless newborn to the energetic two and half year old who is currently pushing my MacBook closed and asking me to come play with her… Leer más “Clients, the Web and the Big Misconception”

Talk to Strangers – and Listen

The whole process traversed four stages that make recommendations effective: discovery, validation, confirmation, and actualization. We’ll look at all four, specifically in how they’re used in mobile situations.

1) Discovery: Recommendations need to be readily accessible. Right now, more technologically savvy consumers can find location-based recommendations easily through check-in services, Twitter, barcode scanning, and other means. To gain wider adoption, they’ll have to gain even wider distribution, especially through default mapping and local search offerings on both feature phones and smartphones.

2) Relevance: The recommendations need to resonate in some way with their audience. At Birch & Barley, there were more recommendations for the Brussels sprouts than brunch, but I quickly ignored them and forgot about the vegetables. Food’s a salient example, but this could relate to anything. When I shop at J. Crew, it won’t help if I only see mentions of women’s clothing. When I’m at a hotel, I’ll care more about the WiFi than the spa. Venues and location-based marketers will need to know their audience.


Originally published in MediaPost’s Social Media Insider

The whole process traversed four stages that make recommendations effective: discovery, validation, confirmation, and actualization. We’ll look at all four, specifically in how they’re used in mobile situations.

1) Discovery: Recommendations need to be readily accessible. Right now, more technologically savvy consumers can find location-based recommendations easily through check-in services, Twitter, barcode scanning, and other means. To gain wider adoption, they’ll have to gain even wider distribution, especially through default mapping and local search offerings on both feature phones and smartphones.

2) Relevance: The recommendations need to resonate in some way with their audience. At Birch & Barley, there were more recommendations for the Brussels sprouts than brunch, but I quickly ignored them and forgot about the vegetables. Food’s a salient example, but this could relate to anything. When I shop at J. Crew, it won’t help if I only see mentions of women’s clothing. When I’m at a hotel, I’ll care more about the WiFi than the spa. Venues and location-based marketers will need to know their audience.

3) Validation: Consumers must make sure there’s some credible reason to listen to the recommendation. If there’s one reviewer saying something that strikes a deeply personal chord, it may not matter at all who that reviewer is. In my case, there could be one tourist from Kazakhstan raving about fried chicken, and I’m fine taking a chance. Most of the time, other cues are needed. These factors include: quantity — the sheer number of recommendations listed; convergence — several reviews echoing similar notes; and proximity — how closely you identify with the reviewers. Leer más “Talk to Strangers – and Listen”