10 Coffee Myths You Think Are True


10 Coffee Myths You Think Are True

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Wherever there are great things there are people out there who are set to ruin them, and coffee is no exception. From coffee connoisseurs to Starbucks sippers, coffee lovers everywhere are having their shots of espresso and morning cappuccinos ruined by rumours.

The myths surrounding the world’s day-starter have put the bean in a bad light and there are some misconceptions that need to be debunked. From what good coffee should look like to how much you should drink, there are a few things we need to set straight… so it’s time to wake up and smell the coffee and find out which ‘facts’ about coffee simply aren’t true.

It’s a diuretic

According to studies reviewed in 2007, people who drank beverages containing up to 550 milligrams of caffeine produced the same amount of urine as when drinking drinks free of caffeine. It is true however, that caffeinated beverages containing 575 milligrams of caffeine or more is a diuretic, but when a large sized coffee at most coffee shops contains about 330 milligrams of caffeine, you’re far more likely to be hydrated from your daily dose of caffeine than not.

It helps with weight loss

Apologies in advance if your weight lose regime is about to be flawed, but coffee does not help you lose weight. The sad truth is that although caffeine gives your metabolism a little boost (helping you burn up to an extra 100 calories), studies showed that both men and women who drank more java gained more weight than those who did not.

It causes heart disease Leer más “10 Coffee Myths You Think Are True”

Aspirin, a Wonder Drug? Studies Show It May Prevent Cancer

Taken together, the findings are the first to show the benefits of aspirin in lowering cancer risk in short periods of time. Earlier studies had demonstrated reduced risk after about 8, 10 or as long as 20 years.

“These findings add to the case for use of aspirin to prevent cancer, particularly if people are at increased risk,” lead researcher Dr. Peter M. Rothwell, a professor of neurology at the University of Oxford, told Reuters.

The benefits of the low-cost therapy have to be balanced with its risks, however, which include gastrointestinal bleeding. Over time, said Rothwell, the risk of such bleeding appeared to wane, but additional studies need to be done to confirm that the prevention of cancer outweighs any potential complications that might arise from aspirin’s effect on the stomach.

That type of evidence is what some experts are still waiting for. “I think he’s on to something. I just want to be cautious, and I don’t want to exaggerate,” Dr. Otis W. Brawley, chief medical officer and executive vice president of the American Cancer Society, told the New York Times. “I’m not ready to say that everybody ought to take a baby aspirin a day to prevent cancer.”


Many people take a daily aspirin to reduce their risk of heart attack, but now fresh evidence suggests that the over-the-counter pain reliever may be a powerful tool in cancer prevention as well.

In three new studies published in the Lancet,
researchers from from the University of Oxford say a daily dose of aspirin can reduce people’s risk of developing a variety of cancers and also lower the chance of their cancer spreading.

Aspirin-3D-vdW

The studies looked at patients who were participating in several long-term, randomized trials on the effect of daily low-dose aspirin (75 mg to 300 mg) for the prevention of heart disease. The researchers examined how many of the participants went on to develop cancer. In one study, patients taking aspirin had a nearly 25% lower risk of cancer after five years, compared with those taking a placebo. That translated to a 15% lower risk of dying of cancer during the study period; after five years, the risk of death was 37% lower in patients who remained on aspirin. Leer más “Aspirin, a Wonder Drug? Studies Show It May Prevent Cancer”

La Prevención, clave en Puleva Omega 3

Hoy en día podemos encontrar en cualquier establecimiento de la distribución alimentaria, un amplio abanico de productos funcionales tanto de marcas de fabricantes como de marcas blancas.
Este hecho no pasa inadvertido y tiene sus consecuencias para las marcas, porque hacen que estos productos de marcas de fabricante se conviertan en genéricos.

Dada dicha realidad, las marcas deben de centrarse en aumentar el valor añadido de sus productos funcionales, así como dotar mayores partidas en cuánto a la estrategia de comunicación de sus marcas, creando mayor interacción con el consumidor/cliente, y en definitiva, experiencias únicas.


http://joseantonioantequera.blogspot.com

Hoy en día, la sociedad española está inmersa en la búsqueda de nuevos valores hacia lo sano, natural. La predisposición

Español: Logo de PULEVA.

a tener un mayor estila de vida, se ha impregnado en nuestras vidas y buscamos aquellos productos cuyo posicionamiento satisfaga nuestras necesidades, de tal manera, que nos reporte esa satisfacción que buscamos a la hora de consumirlos. Como no, hablo de los productos funcionales (productos enriquecidos).
Hoy en día podemos encontrar en cualquier establecimiento de la distribución alimentaria, un amplio abanico de productos funcionales tanto de marcas de fabricantes como de marcas blancas.

Este hecho no pasa inadvertido y tiene sus consecuencias para las marcas, porque hacen que estos productos de marcas de fabricante se conviertan en genéricos.
Dada dicha realidad, las marcas deben de centrarse en aumentar el valor añadido de sus productos funcionales, así como dotar mayores partidas en cuánto a la estrategia de comunicación de sus marcas, creando mayor interacción con el consumidor/cliente, y en definitiva, experiencias únicas. Leer más “La Prevención, clave en Puleva Omega 3”

Why You Don’t Have Time NOT To Exercise

It’s so easy to put off exercising. Long work hours, chores to do at home, friends and family to see … hitting the gym ends up being yet another forgotten item on an overwhelming to-do list.

After all, “I don’t have time” seems like a decent enough excuse. You’ve got other priorities. You might not even like exercise much. And those folks who do spend an hour or two every day walking, cycling or working out? They’re clearly not very focused on their work or the other “should do”s in their life.

The thing is, if you’re busy, you can’t afford not to exercise.
Exercise Gives You More Energy

Maybe you’re put off exercising because you’re worried about being tired. If you hit the gym at lunch, you’ll be exhausted all afternoon, won’t you?

Actually, probably not. Sure, if you overdo things and push yourself too hard, you might feel tired – but moderate exercise will get your blood pumping and leave you more alert and energetic.

If you’re struggling with just getting through the day, then try taking some exercise. Sitting at the computer for ten hours straight might feel productive (“I got into work at six this morning…”) but you’re probably slowing down, making mistakes and missing out on creative insights.
Exercise Lowers Your Stress Levels

It’s hard to work when you’re feeling anxious, upset or angry. Yes, you might be able to pour some of that negative energy into your work (“I’m going to get this $%”& report done!”) – but overall, you’re going to find that it’s hard to concentrate.

Being stressed out isn’t good for you or for the people around you. How often have you snapped at a colleague or family member, just because you were in a bad mood? How often have you had to spend time patching up that relationship?

When you’re stressed, you might feel that the last thing you want to do is summon up the motivation to get some exercise. Get moving anyway. Once you’ve been jogging or cycling for a few minutes, you’ll find the stress melting away – almost miraculously. Exercising has a proven effect on our mental state, so much so that doctors now “prescribe” exercise for milder cases of depression.
Exercise Prevents Health Problems…


It’s so easy to put off exercising. Long work hours, chores to do at home, friends and family to see … hitting the gym ends up being yet another forgotten item on an overwhelming to-do list.

After all, “I don’t have time” seems like a decent enough excuse. You’ve got other priorities. You might not even like exercise much. And those folks who do spend an hour or two every day walking, cycling or working out? They’re clearly not very focused on their work or the other “should do”s in their life.

The thing is, if you’re busy, you can’t afford not to exercise.

Exercise Gives You More Energy

Maybe you’re put off exercising because you’re worried about being tired. If you hit the gym at lunch, you’ll be exhausted all afternoon, won’t you?

Actually, probably not. Sure, if you overdo things and push yourself too hard, you might feel tired – but moderate exercise will get your blood pumping and leave you more alert and energetic.

If you’re struggling with just getting through the day, then try taking some exercise. Sitting at the computer for ten hours straight might feel productive (“I got into work at six this morning…”) but you’re probably slowing down, making mistakes and missing out on creative insights.

Exercise Lowers Your Stress Levels

It’s hard to work when you’re feeling anxious, upset or angry. Yes, you might be able to pour some of that negative energy into your work (“I’m going to get this $%”& report done!”) – but overall, you’re going to find that it’s hard to concentrate.

Being stressed out isn’t good for you or for the people around you. How often have you snapped at a colleague or family member, just because you were in a bad mood? How often have you had to spend time patching up that relationship?

When you’re stressed, you might feel that the last thing you want to do is summon up the motivation to get some exercise. Get moving anyway. Once you’ve been jogging or cycling for a few minutes, you’ll find the stress melting away – almost miraculously. Exercising has a proven effect on our mental state, so much so that doctors now “prescribe” exercise for milder cases of depression.

Exercise Prevents Health Problems… Leer más “Why You Don’t Have Time NOT To Exercise”

How I Downsized Myself

Dean Ornish made this point too in “Change or Die.” He found that “radical, sweeping, comprehensive changes are often easier for people than small, incremental ones. For example, he says that people who make moderate changes in their diets get the worst of both worlds: They feel deprived and hungry because they aren’t eating everything they want, but they aren’t making big enough changes to quickly see an improvement in how they feel.” Yes, Ornish’s program is radical — but it comes in the form of highly detailed recommendations that are easy to execute.

3. Success breeds success. This may be my least surprising conclusion, but it’s the one I experienced time and again. It’s striking how losing a few pounds generates the enthusiasm to keep going and lose a few more pounds. In part that’s because little victories inspire greater confidence, in part it’s because outsiders begin to notice and offer positive feedback, which creates even more commitment to keep going. When it comes to change, big victories are the results of lots of little wins.

That’s a point HBS change guru John Kotter has made for years, including in the “Change or Die” essay. “It’s always important to identify, achieve, and celebrate some quick, positive results for the vital emotional lifts that they provide,” the article notes. “Harvard’s [John] Kotter believes in the importance of ‘short-term wins’ for companies, meaning ‘victories that nourish faith in the change effort, emotionally reward the hard workers, keep the critics at bay, and build momentum. Without sufficient wins that are visible, timely, unambiguous, and meaningful to others, change efforts invariably run into serious problems.'”

Here’s hoping your change efforts — personal or professional — don’t run into serious problems. And I hope I haven’t taxed your patience by sharing my personal case study in change.


I know, I know. There’s nothing more boring than when bloggers write about their own experiences as a way to make a broader point about life, work, or society. But I hope you’ll indulge me this one time, as I reflect on a small matter of personal improvement and ask what it might say about the bigger challenge of making change in organizations.

Now that Labor Day has come and gone, I can share the results of a project that has engaged me over the spring and summer — losing weight. I have lost 32 pounds over the last 22 weeks. This is a big deal for me, and not just because my new theme song is Bob Dylan‘s “Ballad of a Thin Man.” It’s a big deal because I achieved something I’ve been thinking about for years — getting to the weight I was in college, more than 25 years after I graduated.

As I reflect on what I learned over these last 22 weeks, I keep thinking back to a much-discussed article we published more than five years ago in Fast Company. Called “Change or Die,” it was a bracing reminder of how hard it is for people to make deep-seated changes in their habits, even when they know the price of failure may be death, in the form of a heart attack. Leer más “How I Downsized Myself”

Column: Redefining Failure

by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected.


by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected. Leer más “Column: Redefining Failure”

Health claims for chocolate shot through the heart

Fans of Turkish or Greek coffee have now been warned that their boiled coffee contains more bad cholesterol-bearing oil than filtered Italian coffee varieties.

The brutal news was delivered yesterday by the Heart Foundation following a review of more than 100 international studies on antioxidants from the past decade.

The Heart Foundation’s national director of healthy weight, Susan Anderson, said the benefits of dark chocolate, coffee and red wine had been overstated, and the review was conducted following concern that these popular beliefs were misleading the community.

”The evidence is just not there in terms of prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease,” Ms Anderson said.


BRIDIE SMITH


Generic pic of glasses of red wine and party food.Wishful thinking … That glass of red wine may not be as good for the ticker as previously thought.

YOU are not going to want to read this: chocolate cannot be relied upon as a source of antioxidants to boost cardiovascular health. But it gets worse: drinking coffee and red wine in the hope it will prevent heart disease doesn’t work either. Leer más “Health claims for chocolate shot through the heart”