HubSpot Launches Free Tool to Analyze the Shareability of Your Tweets – by Dan Zarrella vía @hubspot


 

twitterI love data. I’ve spent the last 5 years of my career dedicated to doing research on huge datasets of hundreds of thousands and millions of rows to reach best practice conclusions. And those conclusions are great for experimentation with specific brands and audiences.

But the real power comes when you begin analyzing your own, individual sets of data so you can find out what kinds of content, timing, and behaviors work best for your specific audience.

Enter RetweetLab.com! Using this free tool, you can analyze any Twitter account — including your account or a competitor’s account — to unearth the data you need to get more retweets. The tool works by allowing you to compare your current behaviors (the small graphs in the text) with the behaviors that are correlated with your account getting more retweets. Here’s how you can use this new, free tool to analyze and improve your own Twitter presence.

How to Use RetweetLab to Analyze Your Twitter Marketing

Let’s start with something we’re all familiar with — the Twitter hashtag. Ever wonder how important it is to spreading your Twitter content? RetweetLab can help you understand that.

The graph above details the effect of hashtags on retweets for my account, @DanZarrella. You’ll notice that the vast majority (93.4%) of my tweets do not contain a hashtag; but those tweets thatdo contain a hashtag tend to get more retweets. I may want to think about experimenting with more hashtags in light of this data, right?

Time of day, especially in the cluttered Twitter stream, can have a huge impact on your effectiveness, too. Take a look at what the hour of day breakdown shows us, this time from an example using the @HubSpot account:

We see that our account sends the most tweets at 2 p.m., but that tweets at that time seem to get fewer retweets than the rest of the day. Based on this, maybe we should experiment with more tweets in the morning, rather than afternoon — as you can see, around 8 a.m. we do quite well with retweets, and even much later in the night, around 10 p.m. Leer más “HubSpot Launches Free Tool to Analyze the Shareability of Your Tweets – by Dan Zarrella vía @hubspot”

If Facebook Introduces Hashtags are you Ready? – thnxz to @socialbakers


1. Keep it Short and SweetIf Facebook Introduces Hashtags are you Ready? image

When choosing a hashtag, make sure that it´s easy for users to remember and that it´s easy to spell. Short and concise hashtags are more effective and compelling than #verylongones­thatarehardto­read.

2. Pay Attention to Formatting

Hashtags should consist of a word or phrase with no spaces or punctuation in between in order for them to be clickable by users. The #underscore_is_an_ex­ception but why would you do that when you can make hashtags more readable by starting each word with an uppercase letter like #PayAttention­ToFormating? It looks neat and it will definitely eliminate the chance that your audience will forget to type the underscore and will therefore get lost in the conversation.

3. Create Unique Hashtags

Try to create one that will stand out of the crowd and differentiate you from your competition. Using hashtags like #conference or #webinar are too general to trigger conversations related exclusively to your company.

4. Promote Your Hashtag

To trigger the buzz and the volume of conversations you are aiming for, help your hashtag out with promoting it anywhere you can. Stick it on to your website, to all your social media channels, to your email signature and even to your marketing materials.

Leer más “If Facebook Introduces Hashtags are you Ready? – thnxz to @socialbakers”

Hashtag Basics: How They Work – Why They Fail | via blog.myprgenie.com


 

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Nearly every marketer uses Twitter – and the vast majority of us also use hashtags – the letters that follow the pound or number sign (#) in a tweet. But here are five things you might not know about hashtags that could help you boost your Twitter results dramatically.

For example, did you know that Twitter didn’t invent hashtags? Twitter users did. Google employee Chris Messina is credited as the “hashtag Godfather” for an August, 2007 tweet in which he suggested using the pound sign as a way to organize groups on Twitter. His original idea was that like minded people could find and follow each other more easily if they self-identified their interests with hashtags.

Also, hashtags can be used in two different ways – to group tweets into categories, so they’re easier to find, and also to indicate that the person tweeting is adding an ironic comment to the message. Most of the time, people use them to add personality to a tweet, and reach people who might be searching for a particular topic.

A lot of entertainment marketers use hashtags to build communities around television programming, celebrities, books or movies – and so do smart brand marketers. They’re especially useful during natural disasters — hurricanes, earthquakes, blizzards and the like — when people want to know what’s happening in a specific location.

Of course, there are times when a hashtag is not appropriate. For instance, last year Entenmann’s was promoting its line of low-fat bakery products with the hashtag #notguilty. Unfortunately, on the day Florida mother Casey Anthony was found not guilty of killing her young daughter, the company’s ongoing social media campaign sent a scheduled tweet using that hashtag – and it wound up in the middle of the comments about the murder trial.

So the first rule of using a hashtag is to search for it before you use it, and make sure that you aren’t dropping a marketing message into the middle of something else that uses the same hashtag.  This is especially true if you schedule tweets in advance – check periodically to make sure that the hashtags you’ve added to pending tweets haven’t become associated with something you’d rather not be associated with.

Here are five times when you should definitely use hashtags.

Engaging Event Attendees Leer más “Hashtag Basics: How They Work – Why They Fail | via blog.myprgenie.com”

McDonald’s Twitter Campaign Goes Horribly Wrong #McDStories


A twitter campaign by McDonald’s backfired when people started sharing the wrong kind of #McDStories (via @bored2tears).

The burger company kicked things off last week by using the hashtag #MeetTheFarmers. But then it sent out a tweet with a more general hashtag, “When u make something w/ pride, people can taste it,” McD potato supplier #McDstories

People took this hashtag and started talking trash. The Daily Mail gathered some of the best:

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Don’t miss: 15 Facts About McDonald’s That Will Blow Your Mind >

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/mcdonalds-twitter-campaign-goes-horribly-wrong-mcdstories-2012-1#ixzz1kNbHvQcN

Top 10 Ways to Follow The Right People On Twitter

It is a commonly accepted fact that one of the best ways to grow your network on Twitter is to go out and follow new people. Assuming you’re following people with the same interests as you/your company, and that you have an engaging Twitter strategy, you are likely to get a follow back. So, how do you find these perfect people to follow? Below are the top ten ways to find the right people on Twitter.
1. Look through lists

Twitter lists are an awesome way to find people that talk about the same things you do. Start by looking at the lists you are on. Who else is on those lists with you? Clearly one of your followers thinks you have something in common with them. After going through all of your lists, try checking colleagues and other industry leaders’ lists. Any list they are on may be full of relevant people for you as well. You can also try searching for lists by category on Listorious.


follow5

It is a commonly accepted fact that one of the best ways to grow your network on Twitter is to go out and follow new people. Assuming you’re following people with the same interests as you/your company, and that you have an engaging Twitter strategy, you are likely to get a follow back. So, how do you find these perfect people to follow? Below are the top ten ways to find the right people on Twitter.

1. Look through lists

Twitter lists are an awesome way to find people that talk about the same things you do. Start by looking at the lists you are on. Who else is on those lists with you? Clearly one of your followers thinks you have something in common with them. After going through all of your lists, try checking colleagues and other industry leaders’ lists. Any list they are on may be full of relevant people for you as well. You can also try searching for lists by category on Listorious.

2. Mine TweetMeme buttons

(s_mestdagh)

If you publish content and have a TweetMeme button set up, check who is sharing your content. Often times people will share your information without using your handle in it. You already know they think you are interesting (or at least your content is) so you are likely to get a follow back. Take it one step further and give them a “thank you” for sharing the link. That way they make the connection that you are the producer of the content they enjoy. Leer más “Top 10 Ways to Follow The Right People On Twitter”

The Art of the Twitter Pitch

Over the past few weeks, we’ve highlighted some tips and tricks for polishing your elevator and email pitch. If a pitch is designed to deliver a succinct presentation of your product or service, then it may be that the 140 character limitation of Twitter makes it a great venue for a pitch.

Stowe Boyd is often credited with the idea of pitching via Twitter. He proposed the “Twitpitch” in order to help him schedule meetings with startups at the Web 2.0 Expo in 2008.


Over the past few weeks, we’ve highlighted some tips and tricks for polishing your elevator and email pitch. If a pitch is designed to deliver a succinct presentation of your product or service, then it may be that the 140 character limitation of Twitter makes it a great venue for a pitch.

Stowe Boyd is often credited with the idea of pitching via Twitter. He proposed the “Twitpitch” in order to help him schedule meetings with startups at the Web 2.0 Expo in 2008. Leer más “The Art of the Twitter Pitch”

Noise to Signal


Mommy, where do hashtags come from?

Mommy, where do hashtags come from?

You know those time-lapse videos that compress days, weeks or years into minutes? The ones with flowers budding, blooming and then withering in seconds? Or late-1990s Silicon Valley startups getting venture capital, blowing it on espresso bathtubs and Dr. Pepper fountains, and vanishing into receivership?

I think Twitter may be the same thing, except for language. In spoken English, it can take decades – even centuries – for new words to emerge, become part of common parlance, and then fade into disuse.

But on Twitter, hashtags can live that entire lifecycle in the course of a day or two. A news story breaks, and competing hashtags vie for dominance. Then a few influential folks adopt the same one. Suddenly the conversation coalesces around it, the term trends, the spammers start using it, and then the conversation peters out as we move on to the next topic.

Is that the pattern? And how closely does it map onto the ways that words and phrases earworm their way into spoken language?

Maybe some up-and-coming linguistics student is already mapping the ways hashtags rise and decay, and getting ready to publish a dissertation… in 140-character increments.

http://www.robcottingham.ca/cartoon/

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