Why Women Make Better Business Leaders | via One Minute MBA


There’s no question that women are making large strides in U.S. business and technology fields. Today’s generation of women professionals are more likely than any other to found, lead or advise a major U.S. firm. But while women continue to secure increasingly high-level leadership positions, there are still some glaring imbalances. For one, only twelve Fortune 500 companies are now headed by women. And numbers on the proportion of female tech startup founders are not any more encouraging; many high-profile incubators report that women founders receive less than 5% of their annual grant awards.

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But recent research from the Harvard Business Review and others suggests something that most of us already know–firms without women in high-level leadership positions are missing out on some meaningful growth opportunities. According to the research, women that excel in business often prove to have more highly developed communication skills than their male colleagues. Women are also often more likely to take initiative and make changes to the status quo. In fact, the study showed that firms with women on their boards saw 42% higher sales returns, a 66% higher return on invested capital and a 53% higher return on equity over firms that did not.

Learn more about the skills and perspectives that women bring to business by checking out Online MBA’s latest video.

Video Transcript Leer más “Why Women Make Better Business Leaders | via One Minute MBA”

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Mindfulness Helps You Become a Better Leader


See on Scoop.itGabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

To keep your equilibrium, practice meditation (or something like it) every day.

Ever since the financial crisis of 2008, I have sensed from many leaders that they want to do a better job of leading in accordance with their personal values. The crisis exposed the fallacies of measuring success in monetary terms and left many leaders with a deep feeling of unease that they were being pulled away from what I call their True North.

As markets rose and bonus pools grew, it was all too easy to celebrate the rising tide of wealth without examining the process that created it. Too many leaders placed self-interest ahead of their organizations’ interests, and ended up disappointing the customers, employees, and shareholders who had trusted them. I often advise emerging leaders, “You know you’re in trouble when you start to judge your self-worth by your net worth.” Nevertheless, many leaders get caught up in this game without realizing it.

This happened to me in 1988, when I was an executive vice president at Honeywell, en route to the top. By external standards I was highly successful, but inside I was deeply unhappy. I had begun to focus too much on impressing other people and positioning myself to become CEO. I was caught up with external measures of success instead of looking inward to measure my success as a human and a leader. I was losing my way. Leer más “Mindfulness Helps You Become a Better Leader”

How To Get Paid What You’re Worth & Other Negotiation Tips


 

by Sean Blanda | 99U.com

Ilustration: Oscar Ramos Orozco
For most us, the thought of bargaining over money is an awkward and painful affair, something we try to get over with as quickly as possible like a root canal or watching a slideshow of our in-laws’ vacation.

But if we skip a few minutes of haggling, we can leave some serious cash on the table and, more importantly, short-change our true value as creatives. One study found that negotiating a raise of $5,000 for your first salary can result in more than $600,000 in additional lifetime earnings.A Cautionary Tale

In 1912, Teddy Roosevelt’s campaign printed three million pamphlets with his picture featured prominently. It was only after the pamphlets were printed that his staff noticed a small line of text that read “Moffett Studios – Chicago” under the picture. The campaign did not own the rights to the photo and licensing a photo for reprinting usually cost $1 per reprint.

A campaign manager was tasked with calling the photo studio and negotiating a fair rate for the use of the image. Shrewdly, the campaign manager contacted the studio and simply asked how much it would cost use the picture, never revealing that the campaign had already printed millions of fliers using the photo. Without further inquiry, the studio quoted a price of $250, which the campaign promptly accepted.

Had Moffett Studios been savvy negotiators they would have taken the time to gather all of the information before offering $250 and proposed a much higher rate instead.

How To Become A Better Negotiator

While the Moffetts of the world might appear a little naive, oversights of this sort are extremely common: we often fail to consider the full impact of a deal in the long run.

To make sure you get a better deal, here are a few tips on mastering the dark art of negotiation:

1. Separate the person from their position. This is one of the primary points of the popular negotiation book Getting to Yes. When we argue over positions, our egos are attached to what we are proposing. Instead, focus on the other party’s underlying interests. Find where interests overlap and work to develop solutions with the other party as a partner not as a combatant. An example from the book…. Leer más “How To Get Paid What You’re Worth & Other Negotiation Tips”

Getting Strategy Execution Right – logs.hbr.org


by Video  |  blogs.hbr.org

Michael Jarrett, INSEAD professor, on the most important imperative for your business.

400.000 followers no significan poder | vía mandomando.com


437,356 followers on Twitter | 3 Secrets of a Twitter MadmanSuelo leerlo al bueno de Jeff Bullas. Me molesta lo demasiado simple de su lenguaje, pero lo leo.

Veo hoy vía RSS: 3 Secrets of a Twitter Madman | como consiguió 437,356 followers sin ser famoso

Frunzo el ceño. Me tiene harto la manía de hacer solo hincapié en la cantidad de followers (y recientemente, con la cantidad de contenido generado). Volvemos a las sumas en lugar de a la estadística, a aplaudir métricas en lugar de alcanzar objetivos, a los cañonazos publicitarios de los 90 en lugar de a la conversación digital del milenio. Otra vez con quien tiene mas grande la cifra de seguidores. Sigo. Pico y me pongo a ver el post.

Van 30 segundos

Ok. Dice Bullas:

Martin es casi un desconocido …bla bla bla … contenido de valor (ahá, la verdad revelada) … seguir a todo el mundo … filtrar y usar saludos automático (ya necesito un Alka-Seltzer)

*(Comparto ampliamente la opinión vertida por Armando…)*Gabriel Catalano

¿Hay algo de todo esto que en 2012 sea necesario decir y que no cause -minimamente- molestia? Leer más “400.000 followers no significan poder | vía mandomando.com”

The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time


HBR Blog Network

Tony Schwartz

TONY SCHWARTZ

Tony Schwartz is the president and CEO of The Energy Project and the author of Be Excellent at Anything. Become a fan of The Energy Project on Facebook and connect with Tony at Twitter.com/TonySchwartz and Twitter.com/Energy_Project.

 

 

 

 

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Why is it that between 25% and 50% of people report feeling overwhelmed or burned out at work?

It’s not just the number of hours we’re working, but also the fact that we spend too many continuous hours juggling too many things at the same time.

What we’ve lost, above all, are stopping points, finish lines and boundaries. Technology has blurred them beyond recognition. Wherever we go, our work follows us, on our digital devices, ever insistent and intrusive. It’s like an itch we can’t resist scratching, even though scratching invariably makes it worse.

Tell the truth: Do you answer email during conference calls (and sometimes even during calls with one other person)? Do you bring your laptop to meetings and then pretend you’re taking notes while you surf the net? Do you eat lunch at your desk? Do you make calls while you’re driving, and even send the occasional text, even though you know you shouldn’t? Leer más “The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time”

Case Study: When Key Employees Clash

The caller ID on Matthew Spark’s phone read “Kid Spectrum, Inc.” It was someone from the Orlando office, probably administrative director Ellen Larson. She had been in daily contact with Matthew since he purchased the company, a provider of in-home autism services for children, eight months ago. He appreciated Ellen’s eagerness to help him build the business, even if she was sometimes abrupt. Kid Spectrum’s previous owner, Arthur Hamel, had told Matthew that Ellen, with nearly two decades of experience in health services, would be one of his biggest assets.


HBR Blog Network
blogs.hbr.org

H. Irving Grousbeck

H. IRVING GROUSBECK

H. Irving Grousbeck is a consulting professor of management at Stanford Graduate School of
Business and a director of its Center for Entrepreneurial Studies.


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Editor’s Note: This fictionalized case study will appear in a forthcoming issue of Harvard Business Review, along with commentary from experts and readers. If you’d like your comment to be considered for publication, please be sure to include your full name, company or university affiliation, and email address.

The caller ID on Matthew Spark’s phone read “Kid Spectrum, Inc.” It was someone from the Orlando office, probably administrative director Ellen Larson. She had been in daily contact with Matthew since he purchased the company, a provider of in-home autism services for children, eight months ago. He appreciated Ellen’s eagerness to help him build the business, even if she was sometimes abrupt. Kid Spectrum’s previous owner, Arthur Hamel, had told Matthew that Ellen, with nearly two decades of experience in health services, would be one of his biggest assets.

“Matthew, it’s Ellen. I don’t want to bother you again, but we have a situation down here.”
Matthew sat back in his chair and readied himself. The “situation” could be anything from the copier running out of ink to the building catching on fire.

“I’m calling about Ronnie,” she said… Leer más “Case Study: When Key Employees Clash”