Introducing Video Slides – thnxz @labnol


With Video Slides, you can quickly create a beautiful slideshow from one or more videos pulled from Youtube and Vimeo. Just past the raw video URLs in any format and the tool will bundle them into a presentation.

There’s a pretty interesting thread on Hacker News where people have shared links to their favorite technical talks. The thread includes dozens of links pointing to YouTube, Vimeo and other video websites.
With Video Slides, you can quickly create a beautiful slideshow from one or more videos pulled from Youtube and Vimeo. Just past the raw video URLs in any format and the tool will bundle them into a presentation.

Vía http://www.labnol.org

It’s a treasure trove and I want to click on every single video that’s mentioned on that page but the problem is that I will then end up having at least two dozen new tabs in the browser. And this isn’t just about Hacker News, you can open any popular thread on sites like Quora or Reddit and you’ll be overwhelmed with links pointing to interesting stuff.

How do you deal with such a large collection of raw links? I have written an app called Video Slides that some may find handy here. The app will scan the text for video URLs and put them all in a single slideshow without cluttering your browser.

Here’s a quick video demo.


Full article 🙂

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Piccsy replantea las Pitchdeck


http://lincinews.com | Autor: Lincinews

Los presentaciones de empresa hechas en Powerpoint casi siempre son muy aburridas y lo peor, es que, sin un buen diseñador, es difícil hacer algo diferente. Sin embargo, Piccsy, el agregador de fotos que compite directamente con Pinterest, realizó una invitación a revisar el preestreno online de su nuevo prototipo de Pitchdeck (nombre con el que se conoce este tipo de trabajos).  La sorpresa fue que resultó ser una presentación entretenida de leer… ¿Existe algo así?

Piccsy.com/investors contiene el pitchdeck público de la compañía. El formato te lleva a explorar sus contenidos de manera rápida y llamativa (bueno, Piccsy en general es así). El CEO Daniel Eckler admitió que no sabe cómo usar Powerpoint. “Creo que he abierto el programa una o dos veces en mi vida”, señaló. El hecho de desechar la idea de usar ese programa para realizar sus presentaciones, no se debió sólo a la falta de conocimientos, sino que al ser extranjeros, quisieron sobresalir.

Leer más “Piccsy replantea las Pitchdeck”

Lessons Learned Running a Small Business in 2011

As 2012 begins, I want to look back over the past year to see what can be learnt from it. Learning from your mistakes is less glamorous than a list of grand New Year’s Resolutions (Though I do like those too), but often more effective at ensuring the next year is even better than the last.

With that in mind, what follows are some of the lessons I have picked out from my own 2011. I would love to hear if these resonate with you.

When looking back at your own year, I’d encourage you not to look for when things went “wrong” as such, but simply to think of how things may have gone differently. That’s what I’ve done. If I were to go back, I may well do some of these things the same, but considering the alternatives is a great way to learn.


Small Business Working

As 2012 begins, I want to look back over the past year to see what can be learnt from it. Learning from your mistakes is less glamorous than a list of grand New Year’s Resolutions (Though I do like those too), but often more effective at ensuring the next year is even better than the last.

With that in mind, what follows are some of the lessons I have picked out from my own 2011. I would love to hear if these resonate with you.

When looking back at your own year, I’d encourage you not to look for when things went “wrong” as such, but simply to think of how things may have gone differently. That’s what I’ve done. If I were to go back, I may well do some of these things the same, but considering the alternatives is a great way to learn. Leer más “Lessons Learned Running a Small Business in 2011”

Karma as a Social Interaction Design Pattern in Websites

The principles of karma are understood worldwide. We all like to believe that the good deeds and actions we do will be returned to us in one way or another. At its core, karma encourages us to help others.

Most of us were introduced to systems that promote good behavior as early as elementary school. Kids who misbehaved would endure punishments such as restricted play times and detention, while those who excelled and conducted themselves properly received rewards and extra credit, even if it was simply a gold star sticker.


by Jason Gross
http://sixrevisions.com/user-interface/karma-design-pattern/

Karma as a Social Interaction Design Pattern in Websites

The principles of karma are understood worldwide. We all like to believe that the good deeds and actions we do will be returned to us in one way or another. At its core, karma encourages us to help others.

Most of us were introduced to systems that promote good behavior as early as elementary school. Kids who misbehaved would endure punishments such as restricted play times and detention, while those who excelled and conducted themselves properly received rewards and extra credit, even if it was simply a gold star sticker.

Karma as a Social Interaction Design Pattern in Websites

In consumerism, loyal patronage is rewarded at gas stations, airlines, grocery stores, and so forth through loyalty cards where customers receive special discounts and benefits once they collect enough points.

Karma as a Social Interaction Design Pattern in Websites

The Effectiveness of Karma Systems in Social Websites

Karma as a game mechanic works wonderfully in social systems. We see karma game mechanics in action most frequently for user contributions in sites like Reddit, Hacker News (HN), Stack Overflow, and Foursquare.

While each of these sites (along with the many more that have similar features) employ their own algorithms for determining a user’s karma standing, the general idea tends to be pretty consistent: Good actions (such as submitting good links or flagging link spam) increases your karma, while bad actions (like submitting spam or trolling) decreases karma.

In the social web, karma allows a community to self-regulate itself, which tremendously helps in scalability. For example, Reddit — one of the biggest websites in the world, garnering close to half a billion page views a month — is able to run with only 6 staff members, no doubt thanks to the help of the millions of people who use the site and the karma system Reddit has developed.

Karma as a Social Interaction Design Pattern in Websites Leer más “Karma as a Social Interaction Design Pattern in Websites”

A Periodic Table Guide to Google’s APIs [Infographic]

Whenever I see “Periodic table of,” I remember of this blog post by Rob Pike: http://commandcenter.blogspot.com/2010/08/know-your-science…. “Another sort of abuse is comedy periodic tables: periodic tables of the vegetables, period table of the desserts, periodic table of the presidents, and on and on. There are zillions of them. I believe the vegetables one was the first widely distributed example. What’s wrong with them? Again, they miss the point about the one true periodic table, Mendeleev’s periodic table of the elements. In fact, to put things with no structure into a periodic table not only misses the point of the periodic table, it misses the profound idea that some things have periods.


Sometimes a picture is the best way to see what a service offers.
That’s certainly the case with an infographic that shows Google’s APIs as a periodic table. The different APIs are organized by color category. Hover over the category and the table shadows the correlating APIs.

Each API in the table has a link to the page that details the API.

googleapistable.jpg Leer más “A Periodic Table Guide to Google’s APIs [Infographic]”

5 Tips for Aspiring Web App Developers

So, you’re not content with just using the social web; you want to be part of building it, too.

As a budding or beginning web app developer, you’ve got a difficult but rewarding path ahead of you. You have to master (or at least attempt to master) the intricacies of OOP and scripting languages, learn to build web apps the hard way (practice, practice, practice), and network your way into a few job opportunities. You must also decide whether you’d like to work as a solo/consultant/freelancer, a startup employee or founder, or a rank-and-file developer at an established company.

Here are a few tips and words of advice that might make your individual path a bit easier and hopefully a bit shorter. We’ve also compiled a gallery of 140-character tips from veterans at the end of this post.

If you’ve already found success as a front-end web dev, we welcome your suggestions in the comments, as well.


by Jolie O’Dell//mashable.com

So, you’re not content with just using the social web; you want to be part of building it, too.

As a budding or beginning web app developer, you’ve got a difficult but rewarding path ahead of you. You have to master (or at least attempt to master) the intricacies of OOP and scripting languages, learn to build web apps the hard way (practice, practice, practice), and network your way into a few job opportunities. You must also decide whether you’d like to work as a solo/consultant/freelancer, a startup employee or founder, or a rank-and-file developer at an established company.

Here are a few tips and words of advice that might make your individual path a bit easier and hopefully a bit shorter. We’ve also compiled a gallery of 140-character tips from veterans at the end of this post.

If you’ve already found success as a front-end web dev, we welcome your suggestions in the comments, as well.

1. Go Open Source

By far the most oft-repeated words of advice we heard from masters of the web dev trade were these: Put in some time on open-source projects. The hands-on experience will challenge you, educate you and help you build your body of work.

Aside from code for code’s sake, open source projects are a good way to meet other devs and do some networking. You’ll have the opportunity to work with people who are much more skilled and experienced than you are yet; take full advantage of this situation and be a sponge.

SourceForge and GitHub and good places to start looking for open source projects that appeal to you; also, as you follow various blogs around the web and see what projects might need a few extra hands. Sites like Code for America and organizations such as the Mozilla Foundation are always looking for good developers with free time.

Finally, when working on open source apps, not only will you get great practice and be able to learn from some really excellent engineers; you’ll also be giving back to the community. As some would say, creating and sharing free and open-source software is one of the best things you can do to help your neighbors as a developer.

2. Expand Your Web-Browsing Repertoire

“Fish where the fish are” is an old advertising axiom. Its meaning is fairly obvious: If you’re aiming to meet, influence or otherwise “catch” a particular group of people, you have to be seen and heard in the places (real or digital) where they congregate.

If you’re “fishing” for other developers — the people who will teach you, help you, and with any luck, hire you — you’ll need to add a new set of websites to your browsing and bookmarking repertoire.

Hacker News (Hacker News), while it occasionally deviates toward social media/Silicon Valley in-jokes and gossip, can be a wonderful resource for meeting other developers, getting advice and learning about the ecosystem, particularly where startups are concerned. The site is an offshoot of Y Combinator, the well-known startup incubator.

GitHub’s Gist, Forrst, UseTheSource and CodeSnipp.it are four places on the web where you can go to see and post brief code examples. Be open to critique, and don’t be a show off. For UseTheSource, we recommend lurking until you’re ready to post your most stellar hacks, as the site is intended to be a repository for beautiful code.

Other sites to check out include SourceForge, Stack Overflow (Stack Overflow), Google Code and Google Groups (Google Groups). There are literally hundreds of solid online resources for web app developers; which sites you follow and which communities you join really depends on your desired areas of expertise and spheres of professional interest.

Once you’re ready to move into the work force as a web dev, our readers have recommended Dice, ODesk, and even Craigslist (Craigslist) as good spots for job-hunting, particularly for freelance work.

3. Network Your Socks Off

Of course, along with all this new web-browsing activity, you’ll be seeing a horde of new and friendly faces: The developers and designers that make up the web app-building community.

Blogger (blogger), entrepreneur and developer Jesse Stay says, “Network, network, network! Find your future boss on Facebook (Facebook), LinkedIn (LinkedIn) and Twitter (Twitter),” and his advice rings true. If you can locate and befriend a few like-minded, highly skilled professional web devs, they might be able to guide and help you in your career as you broaden and deepen your skill set.

We recommend joining a few Facebook groups and checking out developer-oriented Twitter lists from Twitter users you already follow and respect. Once you’ve located the people you’d like to emulate, go back to Tip 1 and see how you can offer your time and skills to any open source projects those people might be involved in.

The golden rules of networking still apply: Give as much as you’d like to receive, and be a good resource and connector for others, not just a parasite.

4. Show Your Code

Once you’re practicing, networking, reading, working and generating piles of beautifully functional code, you’re going to want to show it off to the world. After all, as one reader said, “GitHub is the new résumé.”

Use a robust, accessible code repository such as GitHub or SourceForge, release your code into the wild. And don’t stop there; be sure to blog about any clever hacks or efficient new ways of doing things that you may discover along the way. Make sure your code samples show good architecture, documentation and versatility.

Showing others your code is equal parts giving back (by open-sourcing it) and self-promotion (if the code is good, that is). If the code you’re posting is worthy, then sharing it is a win-win scenario.

5. Market Yourself

For some devs, bragging is second nature. For others, self-promotion is an uncomfortable stretch. No matter which camp you fit into (and even if you’re somewhere in between), you’ll need to learn how to gracefully and effectively promote yourself as a web applications developer.

It goes without saying that you’ll want to put the full force of your coding skills into building an elegant website. We don’t mean elegant in the general sense of the term; we mean “elegant” as in “the intersection of simplicity and functionality” in form and function. And it goes without saying that the source code for your site should be immaculate, as well.

Focus on creating a good portfolio that shows a breadth of work on a variety of projects. Your apps could be entirely open-source; you could also include client work, if you’ve had the opportunity to develop web apps for others. Make sure this experience is attractively highlighted on your résumé, along with any languages or frameworks you know and your proficiency in each.

Once you have a great website that showcases your skills, make sure you and others link to it frequently in your email signature and from your other online profiles, and don’t be afraid to show your Twitter and Facebook friends when you add a new item to your portfolio or update a section of your website. Whether you use physical or digital business cards, make sure your website is the most prominent link the receiver will see.


Bonus Round: Little Things Mean a Lot


  • If you’re looking for full-time work, be a great developer and a well-rounded candidate with communication skills.
  • Always thoroughly comment your code.
  • Be as good at reading code as you are at writing it.
  • If you’re a developer, learn something about design, UX/UI, business and web economics (especially if you’re going into a startup).
  • Customize your personal growth: If you don’t get a job, ask why and what you can do to improve.
  • Remember the big picture — make sure your code is built with scalability in mind.
  • Commit to perpetual self-education.
  • Don’t give up.

10 Observations on Duct Tape Marketing’s Dirty Little Marketing Research Secret

“the one place I turn to keep myself rooted in how the world thinks and buys, you know, marketing research, is PEOPLE magazine.” – John Jantsch (Duct Tape Marketing)

Interesting. I was taking a gander at the book Duct Tape Marketing, and this advice about People magazine was kind of unique.

After all, often, we are what we read, and so as someone who helps run a company, writes software, does customer support, does marketing, writes more software, etc. I’m constantly reading the likes of Hacker News, Wired, Reddit, technology and marketing blogs.

But I’d probably bet a good majority of customers of popular software on the web (like say Basecamp) haven’t even heard of Hacker News. But I bet they’ve at least skimmed a People magazine more than once.



“the one place I turn to keep myself rooted in how the world thinks and buys, you know, marketing research, is PEOPLE magazine.” – John Jantsch (Duct Tape Marketing)

Interesting. I was taking a gander at the book Duct Tape Marketing, and this advice about People magazine was kind of unique.

After all, often, we are what we read, and so as someone who helps run a company, writes software, does customer support, does marketing, writes more software, etc. I’m constantly reading the likes of Hacker News, Wired, Reddit, technology and marketing blogs.

But I’d probably bet a good majority of customers of popular software on the web (like say Basecamp) haven’t even heard of Hacker News. But I bet they’ve at least skimmed a People magazine more than once. Leer más “10 Observations on Duct Tape Marketing’s Dirty Little Marketing Research Secret”