Infographic: What Consumers Want—And How to Give It to Them


By The Team | Yahoo Advertising

Online shoppers are comfortable receiving targeted ads and more prone to act on them, says new study

 

There are some misconceptions about online consumers that marketers must push aside to engage more effectively with them, says today’s infographic, based on a recent study by Sociomantic Labs.

For example, online shopping isn’t a leisurely, recreational pursuit for most consumers. Nearly half go to a specific site with a specific product in mind and purchase it, says the study. And far from being put off by personalized ads, the majority of consumers are comfortable receiving them on PCs, mobile devices, and social sites—and they’re much more likely to act on them, too.

Some interesting habits of online consumers:

  • 58% put an item in their shopping cart only when they’re planning to buy it
  • 70% are comfortable receiving ads and content specifically targeted to them
  • 52% are more likely to act on a targeted PC ad versus 26% for non-targeted ads
  • 67% are more likely to act on a targeted mobile coupon vs 35% for non-targeted coupons

The key takeaway is that online consumers have come to expect, appreciate and respond to personalized ads. That point was made loud and clear in our study “Smart Mobile: How Mobility Influences Category Shopping,” in which 49% of mobile shoppers said they preferred personalized ads. For more perspectives, see “For Online Travel Shoppers, Personalized Ads are the Only Way to Fly” and “Introducing New Opportunities With Yahoo! Stream Ads,” our new native ad format that matches the content of pages being viewed by online users.

 

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3 Things to Consider When Designing Your Business Signs | workawesome.com


 

Work Awesome

Designing your business signs

Everywhere you go, you see signs: billboards, road signs, aisle markers, window signs, and service and business signs.  They’re how we find our way through commercial and public places. Whether we’re just looking for a specific exhibit in a museum or for the cereal aisle in a grocery store, signs showcase where things are and they draw foot traffic.

That said, signs have to be clear and effective at conveying their message otherwise they stand the chance of being ignored or passed by in the search for the most easily accessible information.

There are many tips and tricks for designing your business signs and effective signage but if you simply follow basic design principles most of the problems disappear at the beginning.

So here are three things to consider when designing your sign before it’s sent off to print!

1. Too Many Good Things

At some point, every piece of media has to go through a cutting room.  Even something that had only a few ideas to begin with can blow up into a piece beyond its own scope.  The bright red text, green mascot, customer image, and product background may seem like a great way to show everything you offer at once but it’s too much too quickly. Remove some of it!

Pick your points and run with them.  Are you emphasizing a specific product? Then use the customer action shot with the product.  Use it only as a label and let the image speak for itself.  Is the sign a general piece for your brand or company? Then use the mascot and the letterhead or a logo.  Don’t bog things down with images of your products when a quick image, your name, and a tagline can carry the message quickly and cleanly!

Use basic color theory.  There’s limited real estate on your sign so stick with two or three colors that mesh well.  There are plenty of online resources that give advice on color theory and how to apply it.  If you want, look up a color wheel to check for complimentary colors.  You can also take your main color for the sign and look for specific color themes that match it to help your sign pop out among the crowd. Leer más “3 Things to Consider When Designing Your Business Signs | workawesome.com”

Social Media Insider: CheckPoints Makes An End-Run Around Location

Consider ShopKick, for example. In a recent Q&A on MediaPost, I was willing to peg Shopkick as the most overhyped mobile technology. As Shopkick has been the subject of stories in major media outlets from here to Botswana, it’s easy to call it overhyped. The gist of the app is that you earn points by walking into select stores, which the app confirms by using the microphone to pick up an inaudible audio tone played by a speaker placed near a retailer’s entrance. More points, dubbed “kickbucks,” kick in when users take specific actions within the store such as scanning select products. Location is central to the app. The kickbucks only matter so much here, as I’ve made it to level six with over 400 kickbucks (in other words, I’ve used this app a lot) and still haven’t earned a $2 Best Buy gift card. The app is still very new and can play a role in having consumers engage with locations and products, but it’s not fully baked yet. [Más…]

Yesterday, a new location-centric application called CheckPoints was announced that’s designed to shift the framework of the experience. Instead of focusing on locations, CheckPoints works with brands, including launch partners Belkin, Energizer, Seventh Generation, and Tyson Foods. While users can check in at various shopping locations, the focus is on the apps’ featured products. Scanning those products unlocks custom content and rewards. Here, the rewards are designed to be more tangible so it doesn’t take too long to understand the benefits. Rewards can include airline miles and other offers not necessarily related to the items scanned.

Brands will be rooting for this app to work. I work with a number of consumer packaged goods brands, and I’m sure this will come up in conversation with several of them. If this app starts influencing users’ purchase decisions, especially in ways brands can readily track, then brands will promote the app themselves. In essence, it will mark a transition of slotting fees to scanning fees. It’s also worth noting that despite the differences between CheckPoints and Shopkick today, Shopkick can just as easily be used to promote products across a wide range of locations.

The limitations of product-scanning apps are numerous, and they’re worth keeping in mind. The technological hurdles will be overcome within several years, but consumer behavior may not change as fast.


//www.marketersstudio.com | by David Berkowitz, Senior Director of Emerging Media & Innovation for agency 360i.


Today’s column, which originally ran in MediaPost

Checkpoints1

I’ve got a riddle for you: What’s the hardest part about location-based marketing? Here’s a hint: It’s not the marketing.

The challenge tends to lie in dealing with locations. This comes up all the time. Can locations accept mobile coupons? Does a brand have the right to run marketing around locations they don’t own? For locations that are part of a chain, is the marketing the responsibility of the store owner or the corporate marketing group? While locations now offer compelling digital marketing opportunities thanks to advances in mobile media and devices, locations also cause a few wrinkles in some otherwise solid marketing plans.

Consider ShopKick, for example. In a recent Q&A on MediaPost, I was willing to peg Shopkick as the most overhyped mobile technology. As Shopkick has been the subject of stories in major media outlets from here to Botswana, it’s easy to call it overhyped. The gist of the app is that you earn points by walking into select stores, which the app confirms by using the microphone to pick up an inaudible audio tone played by a speaker placed near a retailer‘s entrance. More points, dubbed “kickbucks,” kick in when users take specific actions within the store such as scanning select products. Location is central to the app. The kickbucks only matter so much here, as I’ve made it to level six with over 400 kickbucks (in other words, I’ve used this app a lot) and still haven’t earned a $2 Best Buy gift card. The app is still very new and can play a role in having consumers engage with locations and products, but it’s not fully baked yet. Leer más “Social Media Insider: CheckPoints Makes An End-Run Around Location”

Ja-Naé Duane Thoughts On Grocery Social Media Marketing

Ja-Naé Duane answers my questions about the U.S. grocery store number of social media followers. Ja-Naé Duane is a colleague from Boston, author of “how to start your business with $100,” and social media maven:

John: What does this chart say about the state of social media adoption among large grocery chains?

JD: There is a huge gap in the way national brands are adapting to social media as a channel verses the regional brands. However, no matter what the brand, these numbers are drastically low.

John: Why do you think national chains have a more active social media presence than regional supermarkets?

JD: The national brands extend from coast to coast and reside within heavily influenced social areas. I would guess that some of these brands are in more rural areas of the United States, where the consumers have yet to adapt to social media themselves, so those brands are waiting to spend the money and invest in social media as a channel.


Ja-Naé Duane Ja-Naé Duane answers my questions about the U.S. grocery store number of social media followers. Ja-Naé Duane is a colleague from Boston, author of “how to start your business with $100,” and social media maven:

John: What does this chart say about the state of social media adoption among large grocery chains?

JD: There is a huge gap in the way national brands are adapting to social media as a channel verses the regional brands. However, no matter what the brand, these numbers are drastically low.

John: Why do you think national chains have a more active social media presence than regional supermarkets?

JD: The national brands extend from coast to coast and reside within heavily influenced social areas. I would guess that some of these brands are in more rural areas of the United States, where the consumers have yet to adapt to social media themselves, so those brands are waiting to spend the money and invest in social media as a channel. Leer más “Ja-Naé Duane Thoughts On Grocery Social Media Marketing”

In Recession, Drinking Moves from Bars to Home

Erin Ryan / Corbis

When the going gets tough, the tough, um, go drinking. That’s the word from a new Gallup poll showing that 67% of Americans are hitting the bottle, the most since 1985. Another sign of challenging economic times: more and more of those rounds are happening in the kitchen, not at the corner pub.

A new report by Mintel International, a market-research firm, shows that a growing number of Americans are guzzling down wine and spirits at home as opposed to in bars and restaurants, and many are trading down to cheaper brands as they seek fiscally conscious ways to party in a sluggish economy. (See pictures of booze under a microscope.)

“We used to say that [alcohol consumption] was recession-proof or at least recession-resilient, but the rules have changed in this recession,” says David Henkes, a vice president at Technomic, a research and consulting firm. [Más…]

Though the recession technically ended more than a year ago, high unemployment, stagnant wages, falling home prices and shrinking retirement savings have shattered consumer confidence and affected where and how much Americans imbibe, according to the Mintel report. Traffic to restaurants has plunged, with fine-dining establishments taking the biggest hit as businesses pull back on entertaining clients and consumers keep a tighter grip on their pocketbooks. (See a new generation of Mediterranean wine.)

Sales of alcoholic beverages at bars and restaurants fell 4.6% in 2009, while sales at liquor stores, supermarkets and other retailers for “at home” drinking rose 1.2%, the report said. Americans are gulping 10 drinks on average each month at home, compared with only 5.7 drinks in bars and restaurants, the report notes. (See the top 10 bad beverage ideas.)


Erin Ryan / Corbis

When the going gets tough, the tough, um, go drinking. That’s the word from a new Gallup poll showing that 67% of Americans are hitting the bottle, the most since 1985. Another sign of challenging economic times: more and more of those rounds are happening in the kitchen, not at the corner pub.

A new report by Mintel International, a market-research firm, shows that a growing number of Americans are guzzling down wine and spirits at home as opposed to in bars and restaurants, and many are trading down to cheaper brands as they seek fiscally conscious ways to party in a sluggish economy. (See pictures of booze under a microscope.)

“We used to say that [alcohol consumption] was recession-proof or at least recession-resilient, but the rules have changed in this recession,” says David Henkes, a vice president at Technomic, a research and consulting firm. Leer más “In Recession, Drinking Moves from Bars to Home”

Put All Your Club Cards on a Digital Key Ring

Quick Pitch: Never carry plastic loyalty cards again. Download “Key Ring Reward Cards” for free on your iPhone or Android device.

Genius Idea: Key Ring, a mobile loyalty card application for iPhone and Andriod made by Mobestream Media, serves the same purpose as other apps such as CardStar — mitigating loyalty card buildup.

Consumers tend to carry around cards for retailers or venues they frequent on a regular basis, including gyms, boutiques, drug stores and grocery stores. The Key Ring Rewards Card application makes a digital copy of those cards so that you can leave the physical cards at home.

You can download the free app and use it to scan the barcodes on your loyalty and club cards. To get started, select “Add Card” and click yes or no to specify whether or not the card in question has a barcode. If it does, the app will then let you scan the barcode, identify the retailer and create a digital copy. If the card doesn’t have a barcode, you can manually input the membership ID in lieu of the barcode scan.



Name:
Key Ring

Quick Pitch: Never carry plastic loyalty cards again. Download “Key Ring Reward Cards” for free on your iPhone or Android device.

Genius Idea: Key Ring, a mobile loyalty card application for iPhone and Andriod made by Mobestream Media, serves the same purpose as other apps such as CardStar — mitigating loyalty card buildup.

Consumers tend to carry around cards for retailers or venues they frequent on a regular basis, including gyms, boutiques, drug stores and grocery stores. The Key Ring Rewards Card application makes a digital copy of those cards so that you can leave the physical cards at home.

You can download the free app and use it to scan the barcodes on your loyalty and club cards. To get started, select “Add Card” and click yes or no to specify whether or not the card in question has a barcode. If it does, the app will then let you scan the barcode, identify the retailer and create a digital copy. If the card doesn’t have a barcode, you can manually input the membership ID in lieu of the barcode scan. Leer más “Put All Your Club Cards on a Digital Key Ring”

IKEA, ¿La gallina de los huevos de oro?


IKEA, una multinacional del mueble ¿respetada? y ¿que respeta los derechos de los trabajadores?

La decisión de la multinacional Ikea de convertirse en promotora de centros comerciales –a través de una empresa llamada InterIkea- está levantando una buena polvareda de reacciones en las últimas semanas.

Efectivamente, ésta y otras razones –protestas de las distintas asociaciones de comerciantes y fabricantes de muebles, la bajada de ventas, etc.- están complicando su relación con las administraciones regionales, obligándoles a replantarse varios de los proyectos que tenían en tramitación en España.

El momento no puede ser, por otro lado, más delicado para el sector de la fabricación y distribución del mueble en toda España, que está sufriendo el parón de ventas con gran dureza.

A tenor de estas informaciones, hay que estudiar cuáles son los pros y los contras de las instalaciones de grandes superficies comerciales de estas características.

El sector empresarial del mueble español, las telas para el hogar, los complementos de decoración, la iluminación, etc. está constituido por una pléyade de pequeñas y medianas empresas y debemos analizar, con sentido de la responsabilidad, el impacto socio-económico que se produce en nuestro tejido productivo.

El mito de la “creación de empleo  y riqueza” de Ikea.

En el argumentario de la multinacional sueca para lograr sus implantaciones con mayor facilidad sobresale el mito de la “creación de empleo”.

La horquilla de contrataciones viene estando entre los 200 y 450 empleados, dependiendo de la envergadura del centro. Bien es cierto que no todos son empleos a jornada completa, y que en el caso de contabilizarlos como tales estaríamos hablando de 100 a 200 personas.

Pero a continuación, tendríamos que  preguntarnos cuál es la destrucción de empleo que se provoca en la zona de implantación, tanto en la producción como en la distribución, servicios auxiliares, etc. En definitiva, ¿cuál es la “tasa de cobertura” en términos de creación/ destrucción de empleo?

Desde el lado estadístico, sería difícil dar cifras de la reducción de empleos que se provoca, porque los ceses de actividad y los despidos en las pequeñas empresas ni salen en los periódicos, ni coinciden en el tiempo, son ligeros movimientos sísmicos que no se registran en los grandes aparatos de medida del empleo, pero existen.

Y hablando de creación de empleo, en los últimos diez  meses Ikea ha recortado cerca de 5.000 puestos de trabajo, y reconocía que en los próximos meses podría realizar nuevos ajustes, según una información que recoge el periódico Cinco Días (martes, 14 de julio).

El argumento de la “creación de riqueza” es cierto sí, pero para Ikea, que obtiene siempre, al cabo de unos años, una revalorización astronómica de los terrenos. Es sabido que los proyectos de creación de grandes Centros  Comerciales son, primero que todo, operaciones financieras a medio y largo plazo.

Su base está en la explotación vía alquileres de los locales comerciales y, sobre todo, en la revalorización inmobiliaria de los terrenos en los que se asienta el centro y, también, en la venta o alquiler de las zonas anexas para otros usos (de hostelería, de vivienda, de servicios, etc.).

Es por ello que a los hipermercados y grandes superficies como Ikea, que se constituyen como las “locomotoras” de los centros comerciales, los promotores les dan siempre la posibilidad de comprar y no de alquilar – que es el caso de los pequeños comercios-. Así que, no hay nada de altruismo en la pretendida creación de riqueza.

Por otro lado, las empresas multinacionales consolidan balances en función de sus intereses de grupo y obligaciones fiscales. Cada país, dentro de la Unión Europea, observa tratamientos diferentes de fiscalidad, por lo que éstas tienen más posibilidades de “intercambiar” beneficios/pérdidas, según convenga.

En cualquier caso, no esperemos que los rendimientos del capital se queden aquí, o que las decisiones trascendentales tengan otro lugar que no sea su lugar de origen.

El marketing social de Ikea bajo sospecha.

Una de las banderas de la comunicación de la multinacional es lo que se conoce como “marketing social” o, también, como “marketing con causa”.

Entre otras variantes, una de ellas consiste en colaborar con comunidades desfavorecidas en países pobres de Asia o de África, estimulando las manufacturas autóctonas, utilizando materia prima infraexplotada, etc.
Hasta aquí todo muy bien, pero ya el pasado año aparecieron en la prensa mundial numerosas denuncias y la multinacional tuvo que salir al paso.

Concretamente, la Agencia Europa Press, remitía una nota en la que manifestaba que INTERMON OXFAM BÉLGICA había puesto en marcha una campaña en aquel país bajo el lema “Un modelo a desmontar”, en donde acusaba a Ikea de explotar a sus trabajadores en India, denunciando horarios de explotación.

El informe de INTERMON, bastante crítico, aludía a la imagen bien construida de la multinacional como empresa familiar, respetuosa con el medio ambiente… y señalaba – literalmente- “las serias grietas que se habían abierto en los últimos años”, en los que la compañía sueca…”ha explotado a menores en los países del Sur y ha trabajado con productos contaminantes”.

Ikea aseguró que paga los salarios que fija la ley de cada país y que cumple con las jornadas laborales y el mínimo de edad exigido para los trabajadores.

Los regalos de Ikea al sector del mueble español

Uno de los compromisos que asume la multinacional, en el Acuerdo-Carta de intenciones firmado con las patronales del mueble, es el de garantizar a las empresas del sector el ser suministradores de Ikea, de tal forma que se paliara un poco la situación de competencia con firmas de otros países.

Algo difícil de asegurar conociendo la política de aprovisionamiento de Ikea, muy centrada en países de bajo coste de mano de obra y derechos sociales en precario.

El otro “regalo” es, textualmente: “…  la realización de estudios y proyectos dirigidos a reducir el impacto de las nuevas fórmulas comerciales y la dinamización de la actividad comercial del área de influencia”. Algo que, además de no tener un contenido tangible, reconoce implícitamente que se van a producir daños colaterales de “impacto” en la actividad comercial presente.

Porque no olvidemos que Ikea logra su “valor añadido” en la deslocalización y globalización de sus producciones en países de bajo coste de mano de obra, y si tiene que encargar algo a los fabricantes españoles del mueble será por cuestión de pura diplomacia comercial.

Nosotros estamos en otra guerra: la de conseguir “valor añadido” con diseño y calidad en nuestros productos, la de aplicar tecnología punta e innovación en nuestros procesos de producción, la de mejorar precios, servicios, profesionalidad de nuestros comerciales y atractivo en nuestras tiendas para beneficio del consumidor, la de hacer verdaderamente competitiva y vendedora la “marca país” del mueble español.

¿Hay sitio para Ikea, hoy?

Es conocido que los españoles somos excesivamente permeables a la aceptación de productos extranjeros. Parece que todo lo que viene de fuera es mejor.

Pero no podemos decir que los artículos españoles corran la misma suerte en otros mercados. ¿Cuánto tiempo le ha llevado al jamón español entrar -todavía con grandes precauciones y reservas- en mercados como Japón o Estados Unidos? Y estamos hablando de un producto único, de una calidad  gastronómica excepcional.

A los productos españoles les están imponiendo dificultades administrativas todos los días, como forma de frenar su entrada en otros países, porque hay en éstos colectivos o sectores que se ven perjudicados. Son las reglas del juego, y una manera solapada de practicar hoy el proteccionismo por parte de los estados.

¿Por qué nosotros tenemos que dar la bienvenida sin más a un proyecto foráneo, sin hacer estudios de impacto sobre nuestra economía?

Por tanto, antes de tomar una decisión debemos promover un debate entre los diferentes protagonistas, porque hay muchas familias y colectivos implicados.

El sector del mueble de hogar, decoración, accesorios, etc. es un sector ampliamente representado en España y tiene un peso relevante en su PIB, a lo que hay que añadir la importancia de la industria auxiliar del mueble y la madera, y los servicios que comportan: montaje, transporte, embalajes, seguros, financieras… Hay que ver qué perdemos de nuestro tejido productivo y qué ganamos con la implantación de un proyecto así. Esto no es abrir una peluquería más.

La fabricación del mueble de hogar y todo lo que comporta, así como su propia distribución, están sufriendo en España una reconversión sin precedentes, con cientos de fábricas y tiendas cerradas a lo largo y ancho del país.

Hay un exceso de capacidad productiva y un exceso de oferta. Igualmente ocurre con el número de centros comerciales en funcionamiento, hay una saturación manifiesta en la mayoría de las zonas de alta densidad comercial, un exceso de metros cuadrados de superficie de venta que no aconsejan, ciertamente, la entrada de ningún operador más.

¿Hay sitio para IKEA, hoy?

http://winred.com/estrategias/ikea-la-gallina-de-los-huevos-de-oro/gmx-niv102-con15130.htm

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