CHART OF THE DAY: How Google Invests Its Cash

Google (GOOG) has an astounding $26 billion in cash. Brent Callinicos is the guy responsible for investing it.

Brent runs a 30-person trading operation at Google and is developing a more agressive trading strategy by the day, reports Douglas MacMillan at Bloomberg BusinessWeek.




Google (GOOG) has an astounding $26 billion in cash. Brent Callinicos is the guy responsible for investing it.

Brent runs a 30-person trading operation at Google and is developing a more agressive trading strategy by the day, reports Douglas MacMillan at Bloomberg BusinessWeek.

Yahoo! desiste de competir con Google y Microsoft


Image representing Yahoo! as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

La presidenta ejecutiva de la empresa, Carol Bartz, dijo que Yahoo! seguirá modernizando sus sitios hasta mediados del 2011. La compañía perdió usuarios a pesar de una millonaria campaña de publicidad

Bartz dijo a analistas en una conferencia que Yahoo! está enfocado en incorporar a su red de más de una docena de sitios más medios sociales, video y contenidos locales. La red incluye sitios de compras, deportes y finanzas.

La ejecutiva agregó que Yahoo! no planeaba seguir a rivales como Google y Microsoft, que han desarrollado sus propios aparatos o sistemas operativos para teléfonos inteligentes.

“No quiero tener un equipo móvil. No quiero estar de ese lado del negocio”, dijo Bartz. “Queremos tener las mejores aplicaciones”, añadió. Leer más “Yahoo! desiste de competir con Google y Microsoft”

Breaking the Rules: How to Effectively Break the “Rules” of Good Web Design

By Cameron Chapman

We’ve all seen articles devoted to the various web desing “rules” out there. In fact, they’ve probably been drilled into all of our heads ad nauseum. And for many, they serve as a comforting set of guidelines that make our lives easier, at least when it comes to design.

But what about those occasions when you have an idea that doesn’t quite fit in the rules? Or what if you’re just sick and tired of doing everything by the book and you want to challenge yourself creatively? Are the rules really set in stone?

The answer to that is of course not. For one thing, a lot of the rules are outdated. So while they might have been true at one time, they’re not anymore. The other thing is that there are almost always circumstances that demand that the rules be bent or broken entirely. And as designers, we need to learn to recognize those times.

Below are a bunch of commonly-accepted web design rules, along with the reasons you might want to break them, and how to do so effectively. We’ve also included examples for each and the one unbreakable rule.
Your Web Page Layout and Design Should be Consistent Throughout the Site

Consistency can help make your visitors feel at home on your site right away. This makes them more likely to look around and spend more time there. Comfort is a good thing. Most of the time.

But there are two problems with this rule. First, some designers interpret it to mean that every page should be virtually identical. They use the same basic template for every page on your site, regardless of the content present. This almost always results in a site that’s boring and no fun to look at.

The other problem is that different content often calls for different design treatment. Removing most of the consistency on your site can make for a much more interesting user experience. Note that I said “most” of the consistency, though. You’ll want to choose one or two anchor points to keep your visitor from feeling like they’re visiting a different site entirely every time they go to a different page. Consider keeping either a design element like your header or color scheme or something as simple as your logo the same on every page on your site.
Case in Point: Jason Santa Maria

Jason Santa Maria’s website uses a different page design for a large number of his articles. It’s refreshing and shows just how much thought he puts into the content he provides. At the same time, it’s worth clicking through to multiple posts just for the designs alone. Always a good thing if you’re looking for deep engagement from your visitors.

The unifying element that keeps you feeling like you’re on the same site is the top navigation.


By Cameron Chapman

We’ve all seen articles devoted to the various web desing “rules” out there. In fact, they’ve probably been drilled into all of our heads ad nauseum. And for many, they serve as a comforting set of guidelines that make our lives easier, at least when it comes to design.

But what about those occasions when you have an idea that doesn’t quite fit in the rules? Or what if you’re just sick and tired of doing everything by the book and you want to challenge yourself creatively? Are the rules really set in stone?

The answer to that is of course not. For one thing, a lot of the rules are outdated. So while they might have been true at one time, they’re not anymore. The other thing is that there are almost always circumstances that demand that the rules be bent or broken entirely. And as designers, we need to learn to recognize those times.

Below are a bunch of commonly-accepted web design rules, along with the reasons you might want to break them, and how to do so effectively. We’ve also included examples for each and the one unbreakable rule.

Your Web Page Layout and Design Should be Consistent Throughout the Site

Consistency can help make your visitors feel at home on your site right away. This makes them more likely to look around and spend more time there. Comfort is a good thing. Most of the time.

But there are two problems with this rule. First, some designers interpret it to mean that every page should be virtually identical. They use the same basic template for every page on your site, regardless of the content present. This almost always results in a site that’s boring and no fun to look at.

The other problem is that different content often calls for different design treatment. Removing most of the consistency on your site can make for a much more interesting user experience. Note that I said “most” of the consistency, though. You’ll want to choose one or two anchor points to keep your visitor from feeling like they’re visiting a different site entirely every time they go to a different page. Consider keeping either a design element like your header or color scheme or something as simple as your logo the same on every page on your site.

Case in Point: Jason Santa Maria

Jason Santa Maria’s website uses a different page design for a large number of his articles. It’s refreshing and shows just how much thought he puts into the content he provides. At the same time, it’s worth clicking through to multiple posts just for the designs alone. Always a good thing if you’re looking for deep engagement from your visitors.

The unifying element that keeps you feeling like you’re on the same site is the top navigation.

Jasonsantamariahome in Breaking the Rules: How to Effectively  Break the Rules of Good Web Design Leer más “Breaking the Rules: How to Effectively Break the “Rules” of Good Web Design”

Usar las fuentes de Google Font API en nuestras páginas web

Google Font API es una de las nuevas herramientas anunciadas ayer en el evento I/O 2010. Esta herramienta nos permite incluir tipografías open source en nuestros desarrollos web de una forma sencilla simplemente añadiendo una línea de código.

Google se encargará de almacenar estas tipografías en un directorio de fuentes que podremos utilizar con tres sencillos pasos:


Illustration of different font types and the n...
Image via Wikipedia

Google Font API es una de las nuevas herramientas anunciadas ayer en el evento I/O 2010. Esta herramienta nos permite incluir tipografías open source en nuestros desarrollos web de una forma sencilla simplemente añadiendo una línea de código.

Google se encargará de almacenar estas tipografías en un directorio de fuentes que podremos utilizar con tres sencillos pasos: Leer más “Usar las fuentes de Google Font API en nuestras páginas web”

Google TV realiza su puesta de largo

Ya es oficial. El gigante de internet Google extiende también sus tentáculos al sector de la televisión. Con Google TV, cuya puesta de largo tuvo lugar ayer en San Francisco, la frontera entre internet y televisión se diluye.

El nuevo servicio de Google, basado en el sistema operativo Android y el chip Atom de Intel, permitirá al usuario ver la televisión y navegar por la red de manera simultánea. Es decir, será posible seguir un programa televisivo y al mismo tiempo buscar vídeos en la plataforma de vídeos YouTube o conectarse a la red social Facebook.

Los espectadores de Google TV podrán minimizar la pantalla de la emisión televisión que están viendo en ese momento para comenzar a navegar con internet y comentar el programa, por ejemplo, con sus amigos en Twitter. Tendrán la oportunidad, asimismo, de generar subtítulos de manera simultánea.


Ya es oficial. El gigante de internet Google extiende también sus tentáculos al sector de la televisión. Con Google TV, cuya puesta de largo tuvo lugar ayer en San Francisco, la frontera entre internet y televisión se diluye.

El nuevo servicio de Google, basado en el sistema operativo Android y el chip Atom de Intel, permitirá al usuario ver la televisión y navegar por la red de manera simultánea. Es decir, será posible seguir un programa televisivo y al mismo tiempo buscar vídeos en la plataforma de vídeos YouTube o conectarse a la red social Facebook.

Los espectadores de Google TV podrán minimizar la pantalla de la emisión televisión que están viendo en ese momento para comenzar a navegar con internet y comentar el programa, por ejemplo, con sus amigos en Twitter. Tendrán la oportunidad, asimismo, de generar subtítulos de manera simultánea. Leer más “Google TV realiza su puesta de largo”

Where Does Google TV Fit Into Search?

By Chris Crum
Considerations if Google TV Takes Off

It’s time to start optimizing your web content for the big screen. Here at Google I/O, as I’m sure you’ve heard, Google announced the much-anticipated Google TV. Naturally, search plays a big role in the service, particularly in the form of the Quick Search Box.


Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

It’s time to start optimizing your web content for the big screen. Here at Google I/O, as I’m sure you’ve heard, Google announced the much-anticipated Google TV. Naturally, search plays a big role in the service, particularly in the form of the Quick Search Box. Leer más “Where Does Google TV Fit Into Search?”

Google Looks To Hire “Social” Chief

Google’s track record in terms of social media is not pretty. Consider the facts: Orkut never caught on in the U.S., Lively was killed after about six months, and so far, Buzz hasn’t done much besides make people freak out. Still, Google’s reportedly forging ahead by looking to hire a “Head of Social.”

GoogleLiz Gannes obtained a recruiting letter describing this position, and Google was at least realistic in terms of expectations. Part of the letter acknowledged, “This is a new and very strategic position, as Google knows it is late on this front and is appropriately humble about it.”


Company acknowledges problems, but wants to “tackle social”

//

Google‘s track record in terms of social media is not pretty.  Consider the facts: Orkut never caught on in the U.S., Lively was killed after about six months, and so far, Buzz hasn’t done much besides make people freak out.  Still, Google’s reportedly forging ahead by looking to hire a “Head of Social.”

GoogleLiz Gannes obtained a recruiting letter describing this position, and Google was at least realistic in terms of expectations.  Part of the letter acknowledged, “This is a new and very strategic position, as Google knows it is late on this front and is appropriately humble about it.” Leer más “Google Looks To Hire “Social” Chief”

El abecedario de Google Earth

El diseñador gráfico y diseñador web Thomas de Bruin se sentó frente al ordenador y empezó a sobrevolar Holanda. Viajó por todo el país, desde Google Earth, en busca de letras, números y signos de puntuación. Y los encontró. El resultado: este abecedario de Google Earth.

El fundador de Studio Lomox se empeñó en buscar las letras en paisajes naturales o construcciones arquitectónicas. Para encontrarlas vale todo. Edificios, autopistas, estadios de fútbol, arboledas… que hallaba en imágenes de satélite.


por Mar Abad

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El diseñador gráfico y diseñador web Thomas de Bruin se sentó frente al ordenador y empezó a sobrevolar Holanda. Viajó por todo el país, desde Google Earth, en busca de letras, números y signos de puntuación. Y los encontró. El resultado: este abecedario de Google Earth.

El fundador de Studio Lomox se empeñó en buscar las letras en paisajes naturales o construcciones arquitectónicas. Para encontrarlas vale todo. Edificios, autopistas, estadios de fútbol, arboledas… que hallaba en imágenes de satélite. Leer más “El abecedario de Google Earth”

Facebook Finding More Ways to Compete with Google

Google has its fair share of competition from a variety of angles. Apple is getting a great deal of the attention in this regard (making two big moves yesterday), but Facebook is up there as well. Facebook is already a key competitor in terms of where people spend their time online. Facebook expanding its presence all over the web only increases that, and will likely play a big role in the diversification of how people obtain information – in other words, maybe a little less Googling. Some of us have even speculated on the possibility that Facebook could one day create it’s own AdSense-like network.


Google Analytics: SML Pro Blog Traffic Sources...
Image by See-ming Lee 李思明 SML via Flickr

How Big is This Facebook Thing Going to Get?
By Chris Crum

Apparently Facebook is not content with only taking over the web, but wants to get some penetration into the physical world as well. Taking a cue from another dominant company, Google, Facebook is now giving brick and mortar businesses decals to put in their windows. While Facebook tells WebProNews the decals are currently only a test with a small number of businesses, I would expect this to be expanded in the future.


Is Facebook a worthy competitor to Google?

Increasing Competition with GoogleLeer más “Facebook Finding More Ways to Compete with Google”

Google vs. Facebook, la batalla por el futuro de Internet

Antes de extraer esta conclusión, deberíamos echar un vistazo a los números del negocio. Así, descubrimos un abismo entre estas empresas. Google, a través de su sistema de publicidad Adwords, ha sabido construir un modelo de negocio viable (lo que no es trivial en el mundo de Internet). En 2009, reportó ingresos por más de 23.000 millones de dólares y beneficios por más de 6.500 millones.


Facebook está alcanzando a Google en cantidad de usuarios. ¿Cuál se quedará con la mayor tajada del pastel de la publicidad online?
Por Federico Ast

Algunos años atrás, Google navegaba bajo un cielo despejado. Era el líder indiscutible, el rey de la web. Esta empresa fundada en 1998 por dos estudiantes de Stanford concentraba la mayor parte del tráfico online.

En 2006, se incorporó el verbo “to google” al prestigioso Oxford English Dictionary. Y, lo más importante, Google había encontrado un modelo de negocio viable basado en la venta de publicidad para monetizar su fabuloso caudal de usuarios.

Pero, de pronto, en el imprevisible universo online todos empezaron a hablar de las redes sociales. Y así fue como una compañía fundada en 2004 en el campus de la Universidad de Harvard empezó a ganar tráfico a ritmo frenético. Nos referimos, por supuesto, a Facebook.

El siguiente gráfico, extraído de la firma de inteligencia online Alexa, nos muestra la evolución comparada del tráfico de Google y Facebook. Y vemos claramente cómo la red social más famosa ha ido alcanzando al rey de los buscadores.

Leer más “Google vs. Facebook, la batalla por el futuro de Internet”

A pesar de aumentar ganancias Google baja en Wall Street

Google, que manejha casi dos tercios de todas las bùsquedas en Internet, ha tenido uno de los trimestres más ajetreados de toda su historia. Escaló su conflicto con el gobierno chino por la censura a su motor abandonando sus operaciones en el continente y direccionando a los usuarios chinos hacia su motor de búsquedas instalado en HongKong.


Más allá de sus batallas con Apple, Microsoft y China, Google obtiene siempre muy buenos resultados con su negocio de publicidad online. Pero los analistas quieren más.

Ayer jueves superò las expectativas al informar que su ingreso neto en el primer trimestre creció más de 37% con respecto al mismo perìodo el año pasado. Las ventas crecieron 23%, también en comparacion con 2009.

Sin embargo, la acción cayó 5% después del cierre de ayer porque los resultados fueron inferiores a los que esperaban los analistas.
Jordan Rohan, analista de Thomas Weisel Partners, dijo que las cifras publicadas por Google “carecían del elemento sorpresa” y que, dada el alza reciente del mercado, “los inversores están buscando papeles con gran impulso ascendente”.

Uno de los factores que limitan el crecimiento de las ganancias de Google es la expansión de sus propias operiaciones. Contrató 800 empleados en el trimestre, el mayor aumento en dos años.

Google, que manejha casi dos tercios de todas las bùsquedas en Internet, ha tenido uno de los trimestres más ajetreados de toda su historia. Escaló su conflicto con el gobierno chino por la censura a su motor abandonando sus operaciones en el continente y direccionando a los usuarios chinos hacia su motor de búsquedas instalado en HongKong. Leer más “A pesar de aumentar ganancias Google baja en Wall Street”

Avanza la computación en “la nube”


Poco a poco las empresas comienzan a trasladar a “la nube” la tecnología web que alojan sus servidores. Suponen que es más conveniente usar la capacidad de computación de terceros que manejar sus propios centros de datos.

Por su parte, los proveedores de “nube” están tratando atraer a las grandes corporaciones ofreciéndoles servicios flexibles y atrayentes. Porque si bien éstas se van aventurando con pasos cautelosos hacia la nube, muchas se preocupan por posibles pérdidas de datos y entrega lenta en la red. También temen que su información confidencial pueda ser vulnerable a los sistemas de otras compañías, o que se les vaya de control.

Para tranquilizar esas preocupaciones, Google organizó una conferencia en sus oficinas para vender sus servicios de computación en la nube – como software comercial o de e-mail – a ejecutivos de grandes empresas.

Empleados de servicios web Amazon, están realizando una gira para convencer a las compañías de que abandonen el intento de crear sus propios centros de datos y los muden, en cambio, s a los servidores de Amazon. En su modelo de negocios, las empresas pagan sólo por los ciclos de computación que usan. Los clientes eliminan así costos de equipos y pueden comprar tanto tiempo en el centro de datos de Amazon como necesiten.

http://www.mercado.com.ar/nota.php?id=364963

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The raison d’être of a business/ Google and political reform


Google in 1998, showing the original logo
Image via Wikipedia

by Shefaly

What is the raison d’être of a business*? To serve a societal or consumer need? To make profits for the shareholders? To keep the stakeholders happy? To create jobs? To realise the vision of the entrepreneur? Any combination of these?

What about social and political reform? Can that be the raison d’être of a commercial business? Would that not be called “profiteering” since any profits will necessarily be about taking advantage of some people’s miseries.

Google, whose original justification for entering China and agreeing to censorship did not convince me, and whose recent strategic moves leave me less than impressed, is now publishing a report on Google service accessibility from within mainland China.

I don’t imagine it uses up much resource for Google to generate that report. But the question must be asked:

What is the point of this exercise and what, if any, strategic aims of Google are likely to be furthered by it?

I frankly find the exercise pointless. Those in the world, who passionately care about the issues of freedom of speech (yours truly included) and political freedom, have a fair idea about what information China blocks. Many of us have friends and business contacts, who straddle China and HK, and do not hesitate to share how their web experience changes in the mainland and the hoops they jump through to circumvent the Great Firewall of China. So Google’s report is quite likely to be preaching to the choir.

If the report is about naming-and-shaming China into something, I think Google is once again over-reaching its raison d’être as a business. Moreover, having lain once with the dogs and now woken with fleas, it can now hardly be a credible turncoat.

Further the timing of such a shaming exercise couldn’t be worse. One could say that Google is just trying to add its voice to the growing discontent in USA with China’s direct impact on the SME and the manufacturing sector, whether through trade and through protectionism. But in reality, China is holding the USA by the short & curlies. Any posturing at this time could only serve to damage diplomatic relations further, especially as the balance is no longer unquestionably favourable to the USA.

My money – and I daresay the smart money of those, who understand nuance and the complex dance of cross-cultural business – is on that Google should do its duty as a business and not try to bring about political or social reform in China. At the very least, any such action reeks of hubris; at the kindest, of naïveté. And when one hopes to do business across cultures, neither is very helpful.

What about the Chinese people and their freedom of speech then?

With a rich, if somewhat inscrutable to us, heritage, the Chinese are hardly a stupid or insentient people. When they are fed up enough, they will redeem themselves.

* n.b. The word “business” here is used to indicate a commercial, profit-making enterprise, funded by private individuals and/ or other commercial institutions. A body such as UNHCR or Amnesty International would not be a “business” by this definition.

Late edits (March the 25th): Links on the issue: My agreement is not a necessary condition for links to be included.

Google’s slow boat from China or slow death? (Telegraph);

Google’s Quixotic China challenge (Business Week);

Google, China and the Art of War (Guardian); via Salil who has commented below;

While you read an explanation of why Google’s move saves face for China, remember the flanking manoeuvre as applicable to diversified businesses.

China Unicom won’t allow Google on mobiles using Android

China reminds Sergey Brin of Russia and WSJ in a hilarious moment says he is using that experience to shape Google’s China strategy. Hilarious because Brin left Russia when he was 6!  His parents remained and tolerated Russia till they were good and ready. They redeemed themselves, when they were ready. Just as the Chinese will.

Google also censors elsewhere: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Burma, Cuba, Ethiopia, Fiji, Indonesia, India, Iran, Morocco, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, the UAE, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.

More on India’s “reasonable restrictions” on free speech here.

Rape, pillage and philanthropy: via Hemant, who has also commented below.

http://shefaly-yogendra.com/

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Will Google’s AdSense be in Trouble Because of Facebook?


Would Facebook Launch its Own AdSense?

Facebook is infiltrating sites all over the web. These sites are happy to add Facebook’s social plug-ins. What if Facebook launched an AdSense-like product – a product that lets publishers stick relevant ads from Facebook on their sites for a cut of the money? They would be HIGHLY, HIGHLY targeted because the more sites that use plugins like Facebook’s like button, the more users will share their likes with Facebook, which goes to the profile, which is where Facebook already draws its information from to serve its own ads today.

Should Google be worried?

These ads are already pretty well targeted, when the user has enough information in their profile. Social plugins like the like button will only facilitate the population of such information in the profile.

Apparently Mashable founder Pete Cashmore has a similar view on this, as he says in an article for CNN, “Google makes the vast majority of its money from ads — these ads typically match your search terms, or the content of the Web page you’re viewing. Google has certainly worked to personalize these ads, but its knowledge of your friends and interests is more limited than Facebook’s. The data gleaned from thousands of Facebook Like buttons around the web could make for an ad network that rivals Google’s AdSense.”

Ian Schafer at AdAge has also contemplated such a scenario. “It seems to be an inevitability that all of this intelligence will one day be applied to power a socially targeted ad network as big (or bigger than) Google’s AdSense,” he says. “It would be a network that would theoretically deliver even better results for advertisers, resulting in higher CPMs/CPCs/CP-whatevers that can deliver higher payouts to publishers, making a choice between the two platforms a not-too-difficult one for those publishers.”

The Like button is a game changer because all of a sudden you have the whole world wide web of content to “like” not just what’s within your immediate network within Facebook and what you may have taken the time to add to your profile two years ago. It keeps user interests current and enables an infinite amount of interest indication that advertisers would salivate for.

If Facebook were to launch an AdSense-like product, that doesn’t necessarily mean Google would completely lose out. I can certainly see a lot of sites going forward with both. When pressed to make a choice between the two, however, it could make things interesting for the industry at large.

http://www.webpronews.com/topnews/2010/04/22/is-googles-adsense-in-trouble-because-of-facebook

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