Easily Capture Screenshots in Google Earth for Android | labnol.org


 

Technology Blog

The Google Earth app for Android includes a handy screen capture feature that allows you to capture and share screenshot images of the current view inside Earth with a click. You may capture screenshots of aerial imagery as well as 3D buildings.

You may wonder why would anyone need this when Android itself include screen-capture capabilities? Well, compare these two images.

Google Earth Screenshot

This screenshot was captured using Google Earth – clutter free image.

This screenshot of Google Earth was captured with Android

This screenshot of Google Earth was captured with Android

The big advantage with Google Earth’s built-in screen capture feature is that it adds none of the on-screen clutter to your screenshot.

How to take Screenshots in Google Earth >>>  Leer más “Easily Capture Screenshots in Google Earth for Android | labnol.org”

See all your Google Contacts on a Google Map | labnol.org


 

Google Contacts on a World Map

If you have been using Google Contacts (or any other address book*) to store the postal addresses of your friends and colleagues, you can easily create an online Google Map with all these address or even view them inside Google Earth. Here are the steps: Leer más “See all your Google Contacts on a Google Map | labnol.org”

How to Apply Eames’s Legendary “Powers of 10” to Real-life Problems

Since our technical systems are wholly mixed up with our natural systems, that creates additional levels of complexity. In order to design within these confounding contexts, we need to be able to scale up and scale down as we design: to consider both the granularity of the things we are designing as well as the much larger contexts within which they exist.

Here’s what I mean. A designer considering urban mobility may start at the level of 10^1and consider only the automobile. But zoom out a bit, and you realize that it’s essential to think not just of the automobile, but also of other competing modes of transportation — buses, bicycles, pedestrians, skateboards — that may determine the speed and feasibility of movement. Zoom out to 10^3, and you must understand the dynamics of the neighborhood, and the impact that automobile traffic has on livability, public health, or retail viability.


Full Article:
http://www.fastcodesign.com/1662461/how-to-apply-eamess-legendary-powers-of-10-to-real-life-problems

This October 10, 2010 is Powers of Ten day — 10/10/10, a milestone on the design thinking calendar. It’s named for the film Powers of Ten, made by Charles and Ray Eames in 1968. And for designers, it’s an opportunity to both celebrate the Eames Office’s groundbreaking film as well as a chance to recognize the power of scale in shaping our understanding of the world around us. There will be festivities around the world. Check out the Powers of Ten website, as well as the powersof10 blog that lists some events.

If you haven’t yet seen the film, take a moment to watch it.

Powers of Ten is arguably more relevant now than it was the year it was released. The simple idea executed in the film has become a powerful construct for thinking through design problems today. In it, Charles and Ray Eames guide us through a deceptively straightforward exercise — zooming out to 10^24 and then back in to 10^-16 — re-framing a simple scene by showing it within ever-larger and then smaller contexts. Leer más “How to Apply Eames’s Legendary “Powers of 10” to Real-life Problems”

Giant Shout-Out to Ayn Rand Scrawled on Google Earth via GPS [PIC]

Ayn Rand is getting some pretty heavy endorsement via GPS of late, as one man — Nick Newcomen — recently drove 12,328 miles across 30 American states to scrawl “Read Ayn Rand” via GPS data inputted into Google Earth.

Newcomen — who explained to Wired that he undertook this mission simply because he is a Rand fan — took more than 30 days to execute this task, using a GPS logger (Qstarz BT-Q1000X) to create the letters. He started in Marshall, Texas, where he began writing out “Rand,” and then drove on (turning off the GPS whilst not writing) until the entire, “Reading Is Fundamental” sentiment was complete.

You can check out more info on the site World’s Biggest Writing, which also features David Lynchian videos of locations Newcomen visited, most ending with a shot of his almost expressionless face (see below).


Brenna Ehrlich

Ayn Rand is getting some pretty heavy endorsement via GPS of late, as one man — Nick Newcomen — recently drove 12,328 miles across 30 American states to scrawl “Read Ayn Rand” via GPS data inputted into Google Earth.

Newcomen — who explained to Wired that he undertook this mission simply because he is a Rand fan — took more than 30 days to execute this task, using a GPS logger (Qstarz BT-Q1000X) to create the letters. He started in Marshall, Texas, where he began writing out “Rand,” and then drove on (turning off the GPS whilst not writing) until the entire, “Reading Is Fundamental” sentiment was complete.

You can check out more info on the site World’s Biggest Writing, which also features David Lynchian videos of locations Newcomen visited, most ending with a shot of his almost expressionless face (see below). Leer más “Giant Shout-Out to Ayn Rand Scrawled on Google Earth via GPS [PIC]”

Consumer Watchdog wants to know what the FBI and DEA are using Google Earth for

By Shane McGlaun

Consumer advocacy group Consumer Watchdog claims that the FBI and the DEA are making extensive use of Google Earth according to federal spending records. What those spending records don’t say is exactly what the agencies are using Google Earth for.

According to the records, the FBI spent over $600,000 on Google Earth while the DEA has spent $67,000 on the application.


Google Earth
Image via Wikipedia

By Shane McGlaun

Consumer advocacy group Consumer Watchdog claims that the FBI and the DEA are making extensive use of Google Earth according to federal spending records. What those spending records don’t say is exactly what the agencies are using Google Earth for.

According to the records, the FBI spent over $600,000 on Google Earth while the DEA has spent $67,000 on the application. Leer más “Consumer Watchdog wants to know what the FBI and DEA are using Google Earth for”

Android Phones Go to War

Reports this week revealed that U.S. defense contractor Raytheon, maker of the Patriot missile defense system, is developing software for soldiers that runs on Google’s Android operating system. The software, called the Raytheon Android Tactical System, or RATS, has already been tested by some members of the U.S. Special Forces. It involves a social-networking type of display where soldiers interact as “buddies” and track each others’ movements on the battlefield.
There’s an App for That! Social Networking for Soldiers, Military-Grade Satellite Images


Reports this week revealed that U.S. defense contractor Raytheon, maker of the Patriot missile defense system, is developing software for soldiers that runs on Google‘s Android operating system. The software, called the Raytheon Android Tactical System, or RATS, has already been tested by some members of the U.S. Special Forces. It involves a social-networking type of display where soldiers interact as “buddies” and track each others’ movements on the battlefield.

There’s an App for That! Social Networking for Soldiers, Military-Grade Satellite Images Leer más “Android Phones Go to War”

Google Earth Shows Real-Time Weather

While we certainly don’t expect you’ll begin planning your days around the new feature, Google has added a new layer to Google Earth that makes it feel even more like you’re taking a live, real-time look at the earth from a satellite above – real-time weather.

Just added to the latest version of Google Earth, the feature offers a live view of the weather, from radar to raindrops.

Weather has been available in Google Earth since 2007, but now “the latest version projects images of rain and snow over the areas with those weather patterns as it’s actually happening”.


Written by Mike Melanson

While we certainly don’t expect you’ll begin planning your days around the new feature, Google has added a new layer to Google Earth that makes it feel even more like you’re taking a live, real-time look at the earth from a satellite above – real-time weather.

Just added to the latest version of Google Earth, the feature offers a live view of the weather, from radar to raindrops.

Weather has been available in Google Earth since 2007, but now “the latest version projects images of rain and snow over the areas with those weather patterns as it’s actually happening”.

On a macro level, the weather layers offer a way to get a bird’s eye view of weather events like hurricanes. When you zoom in, Google takes it one step further and offers an animated view of the rain or snow for that area. The precipitation data currently only covers some areas in North America and Europe

hurricane texas.jpg

The added layer is available in the latest version of Google Earth, which was released in early June with enhanced functionality for both free and pro users.

http://www.readwriteweb.com

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