How the generations use social media to job search (infographic) – pcworld.com


By Kristin Burnham, CIO.com

a new survey from Millennial Branding and Beyond.com looks at the similarities and differences among the three generations and compares how they each approach the job search.

“The most surprising statistic was that Boomers are using the internet as well as social networks more in their job search than younger generations,” says Dan Schawbel, managing partner at Millennial Branding. “Since Boomers are out of work longer and understand the fundamentals of networking, they are going to LinkedIn in order to find new opportunities.”

The study surveyed 5,268 job seekers, including 742 from Gen Y; 1,676 from Gen X (ages 30 to 47); and 2,850 Baby Boomers (ages 48 to 67).

While all generations rely on social networks for job leads to some degree, Schawbel says that none put enough emphasis on networking in-person  …   Leer más “How the generations use social media to job search (infographic) – pcworld.com”

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Introducing Generation C: The Connected Collective Consumer

From Nielsen’s Consumer 360 Indonesia conference presentation by Dan Pankraz, Planning Director/Youth Strategist, DDB Sydney

“I share, and therefore I am”

Just who, or what is Gen C? This question, posed by Mr. Dan Pankraz, Planning Director/Youth Strategist, DDB Sydney, speaking at Nielsen’s inaugural Consumer 360 Conference in Jakarta, Indonesia, drew curious looks and blank faces among participants. Mr. Pankraz highlighted the need for companies to understand and engage Generation C, a group he believes to be the most highly influential in the world due to their need to share their lives via social media platforms.

Unlike Gen Y or Gen Z, Gen C is not an age cohort. “Gen C are teens and 20-somethings that have been “hatched’ out of social media. What ‘C’ stands for has been widely debated. A few years ago it was about Generation ‘Content’ – now it’s about a multitude of things; constant connectivity, collaboration, change, co-creation, chameleons, cyborgs, curiosity. But most of all, Gen C is the ‘Connected Collective’ consumer,” Mr. Pankraz explained.

Gen C is not a target audience but a community of digital natives that will partner with brands. To successfully market to Gen C consumers, brands must create fresh, cultural capital for Gen C to talk about– a process which also gives them “status” within their cohorts or “tribes” and social networks.


From Nielsen’s Consumer 360 Indonesia conference presentation by Dan Pankraz, Planning Director/Youth Strategist, DDB Sydney“I share, and therefore I am”

Just who, or what is Gen C?  This question, posed by Mr. Dan Pankraz, Planning Director/Youth Strategist, DDB Sydney, speaking at Nielsen’s inaugural Consumer 360 Conference in Jakarta, Indonesia, drew curious looks and blank faces among participants. Mr. Pankraz highlighted the need for companies to understand and engage Generation C, a group he believes to be the most highly influential in the world due to their need to share their lives via social media platforms.

Unlike Gen Y or Gen Z, Gen C is not an age cohort.  “Gen C are teens and 20-somethings that have been “hatched’ out of social media. What ‘C’ stands for has been widely debated. A few years ago it was about Generation ‘Content’ – now it’s about a multitude of things; constant connectivity, collaboration, change, co-creation, chameleons, cyborgs, curiosity. But most of all, Gen C is the ‘Connected Collective’ consumer,” Mr. Pankraz explained.

Gen C is not a target audience but a community of digital natives that will partner with brands. To successfully market to Gen C consumers, brands must create fresh, cultural capital for Gen C to talk abouta process which also gives them “status” within their cohorts or “tribes” and social networks.

What makes Gen C “tick”: Leer más “Introducing Generation C: The Connected Collective Consumer”

Two Common Mistakes of Millennials at Work

Most if not all of the digital communities where Gen Y has spent time are highly egalitarian. They’re indifferent to pre-existing hierarchies and credentials, and sometimes even hostile to them. And these communities seem to Millennials to work really well; Wikipedia gives them good information on any topic under the sun, Intrade prediction markets tell them who’s going to win elections, Twitter lets them know what’s going on in the world better and faster than any other source, their Facebook friends answer their questions for them, and so on.

All this can make a strong case to Gen Yers that hierarchy and credentialism are passé as concepts, or should be. So when they show up after graduation at their first employer, some of them start acting this way.


A tag cloud (a typical Web 2.0 phenomenon in i...
Image via Wikipedia

Andrew McAfee

(…)

The first is simple oversharing. I wrote before how narrating your work is a very smart strategy because it lets you be helpful to others, and also increases the chances that they can help you. But narrating your every opinion, emotion, lunch, happy hour, hangover, etc. on your company‘s emergent social software platforms is just narcissistic clutter.

One of the knocks against Generation Y is that they’ve been encouraged to believe that everything they say and think is interesting, and should be aired and shared. This is simply not true for anyone, no matter what reality TV producers would have us believe. Periodically sharing bits of personal information is valuable because it humanizes you, lets others know what kind of person you are, and facilitates socialization and trust-building. But oversharing in the workplace just makes you annoying and immature.

The second not-so-smart practice of a digital native is to act as if all employees are equals, and equally interested in airing the truth. Leer más “Two Common Mistakes of Millennials at Work”

Work/Life Balance and Labor Day

Labor Day in the U.S. is almost here. Many other countries also celebrate a labor day, which has always seemed an unusual event to me. We didn’t celebrate such a day at all until Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City. Interestingly, this is a date that coincides well with the world’s entry into the impersonal and mechanistic 20th century.

I have been noodling for quite some time over the work/life balance movement. I call it a movement because it really came about unexpectedly around 15 years or so ago and has swept corporate America from coast to coast.

I can’t think of any organization that has not had to change policies or at least address its employees about the issue. The work/life balance movement is an interesting phenomenon. I don’t think there has been a previous era when there was such an emphasis on specifically setting aside time for non-work activities.

It is a logical outcome of decades of isolating work from other aspects of life. The idea of creating a balance is based on a set of assumptions that aren’t questioned, yet are very strange from the perspective of a Baby Boomer such as myself or from that of anyone who has studied the history of work.

This is rapidly changing and the work/life movement will wither away over the next few years as people begin to find ways to develop their passion and dreams into paid work that they can do at home or near home when and as much as they want.

Young folks, the Gen Y or Millenniums, are rejecting the work/life notions, much to the chagrin of their elder Gen X colleagues. Gen Y tends to look for work they are passionate about and then they tend to work in ways foreign to Gen X. They take any sense of balance away and may work for days without a stop or not work much at all for some time. They try to choose meaningful and interesting work and embrace it with a passion only seen once in a while with Gen X or Baby Boomers.


Labor Day in the U.S. is almost here. Many other countries also celebrate a labor day, which has always seemed an unusual event to me. We didn’t celebrate such a day at all until Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City. Interestingly, this is a date that coincides well with the world’s entry into the impersonal and mechanistic 20th century.

I have been noodling for quite some time over the work/life balance movement. I call it a movement because it really came about unexpectedly around 15 years or so ago and has swept corporate America from coast to coast.

I can’t think of any organization that has not had to change policies or at least address its employees about the issue. The work/life balance movement is an interesting phenomenon. I don’t think there has been a previous era when there was such an emphasis on specifically setting aside time for non-work activities.

It is a logical outcome of decades of isolating work from other aspects of life. The idea of creating a balance is based on a set of assumptions that aren’t questioned, yet are very strange from the perspective of a Baby Boomer such as myself or from that of anyone who has studied the history of work. Leer más “Work/Life Balance and Labor Day”

From Status to Access: Urban Millennials and Mobile

It was almost a rite of passage, but the rules that governed growing up in New York City in the late 80s/early 90s were unflinching: Once one hit adolescence, one needed a beeper.

Of course no one really “needed” one, but no one wanted to be deemed “disconnected” or “off the grid.” For most, beepers were desired less for their functionality (at least for us lawful citizens) and more as status symbols– there existed an inherent need to identify with the larger, connected group. Even if your social circle was restricted to your 8th grade classmates, we still had a way to get at them (or in modern digital social vernacular, “poke” them)… should they needed to get got at for whatever reason.

Since then, this underlying need of urban America to be constantly connected hasn’t changed much at all. As the technology has matured from archaic numerical pagers to chic two-ways (oh, how I miss my Timeport) to mobile phone ubiquity to the current smartphone craze, the underlying cultural drive has shifted as well.


It was almost a rite of passage, but the rules that governed growing up in New York City in the late 80s/early 90s were unflinching: Once one hit adolescence, one needed a beeper.

Of course no one really “needed” one, but no one wanted to be deemed “disconnected” or “off the grid.”  For most, beepers were desired less for their functionality (at least for us lawful citizens) and more as status symbols– there existed an inherent need to identify with the larger, connected group.  Even if your social circle was restricted to your 8th grade classmates, we still had a way to get at them (or in modern digital social vernacular, “poke” them)… should they needed to get got at for whatever reason.

Since then, this underlying need of urban America to be constantly connected hasn’t changed much at all.  As the technology has matured from archaic numerical pagers to chic two-ways (oh, how I miss my Timeport) to mobile phone ubiquity to the current smartphone craze, the underlying cultural drive has shifted as well.

You and Your Rockstar Resume

I admit that I have spent way too much time trying to find the “best post” for today, and after a long weekend, I am feeling overwhelmed by all my choices and ideas. So, I’m finally done talking, and have chosen to write about two alternative resume formats including a “Social Resume” and VisualCV – both are online tools aimed at helping candidates tell their best story through personal branding. These shouldn’t replace your “old school” resume format, but they may provide additional networking opportunities:

The Social Resume: Our friends at the Brazen Careerist Network launched a new platform this past March, aimed specifically at Generation Y’ers (those born after 1978). This tool is intended to get conversation started online in “real time” and bring the younger set to the forefront of ideas, strategy and thought. If you’re an entry to mid-level career person, this site is for you. The Social Resume is a one-of-a-kind, interactive showcase of your top ideas from around the web. According to Brazen, “this online tool provides a place to organize your thoughts and ideas so that employers, colleagues and friends don’t forget just how smart your really are.” Geared to the post 1978 crowd, the Brazen Careerist site attracts recruiters to its site as thousands of potential employees showcase their potential, strategic thinking and online branding effort.


I admit that I have spent way too much time trying to find the “best post” for today, and after a long weekend, I am feeling overwhelmed by all my choices and ideas.  So, I’m finally done talking, and have chosen to write about two alternative resume formats including  a “Social Resume” and VisualCV – both are online tools aimed at helping candidates tell their best story through personal branding.  These shouldn’t replace your “old school” resume format, but they may provide additional networking opportunities:

The Social Resume: Our friends at the Brazen Careerist Network launched a new platform this past March, aimed specifically at Generation Y‘ers (those born after 1978). This tool is intended to get conversation started online in “real time” and bring the younger set to the forefront of ideas, strategy and thought. If you’re an entry to mid-level career person, this site is for you. The Social Resume is a one-of-a-kind, interactive showcase of your top ideas from around the web. According to Brazen, “this online tool provides a place to organize your thoughts and ideas so that employers, colleagues and friends don’t forget just how smart your really are.”  Geared to the post 1978 crowd, the Brazen Careerist site attracts recruiters to its site as thousands of potential employees showcase their potential, strategic thinking and online branding effort. Leer más “You and Your Rockstar Resume”

From Status to Access: Urban Millennials and Mobile


Author Richie Cruz
It was almost a rite of passage, but the rules that governed growing up in New York City in the late 80s/early 90s were unflinching: Once one hit adolescence, one needed a beeper.

Of course no one really “needed” one, but no one wanted to be deemed “disconnected” or “off the grid.”  For most, beepers were desired less for their functionality (at least for us lawful citizens) and more as status symbols– there existed an inherent need to identify with the larger, connected group.  Even if your social circle was restricted to your 8th grade classmates, we still had a way to get at them (or in modern digital social vernacular, “poke” them)… should they needed to get got at for whatever reason.

Since then, this underlying need of urban America to be constantly connected hasn’t changed much at all.  As the technology has matured from archaic numerical pagers to chic two-ways (oh, how I miss my Timeport) to mobile phone ubiquity to the current smartphone craze, the underlying cultural drive has shifted as well.

The Motorola Timeport 2way pager by Stony2BroadwayThe Motorola Timeport

As technology and information become more accessible the role it plays in our lives is shifting dramatically.  We not only rely on our gadgets to simplify life or manage connections between individuals, but also to maintain a connection to information, even as we’re away from home or work. In this context, urban consumers’ mobile communication “need state” can be understood as having evolved from demanding status…to demanding access.

chart

Why Mobile: Traits of Urban Millennials

“This generation is always ‘on’ and strapped for time as they move through a life stage distinguished by unprecedented upheaval and personal change.”

-Mike Doherty, “Millennials Could Be Your Next Growth Opportunity

The Millennial Generation, defined by Pew Research first generation to come of age in the new
 millennium (1980- ), totals about 46 million Americans.  They are the first generation to experience the Internet as an omnipresent, culturally defining force.

The older end of the Millennial spectrum is finally coming into their own, after living through a historic economic downturn that forced many to cut back on spending.  (Worth noting, that although consumers economized on cell phone plans, the penetration of smartphones actually increased substantially during the recession.)  With the dust finally settling, and with the economy (fingers crossed) on the up and up, it’s these digital natives who are poised to lead the recovery albeit through adjusted purchasing habits & behavior.

Urban Millenials, for the sake of this argument, are generally considered to be more informed and discerning than their general market counterparts, and tend to prefer “premium” experiences, so long that they enhance their lifestyles. Understanding the growing segment of Millennials who subscribe to this sensibility has consistently been a challenge for brand marketers, and for good reason: the overall consumer landscape is traditionally volatile and the practice of looking to standard cultural drivers (entertainment, fashion, etc.) to forecast behavioral and consumer trends has become increasingly difficult with the traditional media landscape melting. Under the assumption that those of the urban mindset usually live at the forefront of cultural trends, the issue is compounded dramatically. This said, marketers’ strategies for reaching these consumers are in need of a fine-tuning- the capability is there, but the thinking has to catch up. One thing we understand as consistent with this group is their affinity for culturally-relevant, progressive content; this needs to be considered at the heart of any consumer-facing communications program.  In the ongoing quest for authenticity, the true value-add for consumers is in how constructive the brand (or its experience) is to their dynamic -their reality-, and not how intent said brand delivered was on delivering something comparable to a throwaway show flyer.

Consider the above as “exhibit A” in the case for mobile as a top-of-mind consideration to connecting with young, urban consumers. In a recent piece on Mobile Marketer reported that multicultural mobile consumption “outdistances the general market almost 2-to-1”, and that “they text more, have more unlimited plans, download and purchase more content, etc.” than their general market counterparts. A number of variables could be attributed to supporting this behavior, but the key here for brand marketers is to aggressively act on this reality and harness the growing power of this rapidly evolving medium to deliver the right messages in the appropriate context.

Reaching Out Leer más “From Status to Access: Urban Millennials and Mobile”