Can Advertising Survive Digital? Yes—By Leaving ‘Mad Men’ Behind

“Advertising hasn’t changed since the 1960s,” says Rosenblum, 40, the cofounder of a 50-person agency called Questus that specializes in digital media and just won anAgency of the Year award from iMedia, a publication that tracks the online marketing industry. “But we’re on the verge of a revolution. People are starting to realize that there are more effective ways to build a brand than through advertising.”
Rosenblum is so passionate about this that he’s even made a documentary film, The Naked Brand, in which he bashes his own industry. “My father looked at it and said, `So what’s your master plan here? Because it looks like you’re going to get hoisted with your own petard,’” Rosenblum says. But the son disagrees: he thinks the revolution is coming whether people like it or not, so he might as well become part of the destruction.

In his film, he argues that companies for decades have behaved abominably and then used advertising to cover up their behavior. The Internet, by giving consumers a voice, has rendered that strategy useless because consumers can now sink a brand with a blitz of online complaints. His advice to big brands: instead of pumping millions of dollars into advertising, why not invest that money into actually fixing your company? Don’t just say you’re great—actually try to be great. Once you’ve done that, you can use social media to spread the word.


At a time when we can tune out commercials with a quick click, one cutting-edge Ad Man is finding ways to dump the old system and sell motorcycles—without ads.

by 
http://www.thedailybeast.com/

Jeff Rosenblum is drinking tea at Soho House, a private club in lower Manhattan, and explaining to me that most advertising doesn’t work, and that the entire advertising industry is stuck in the past and desperately needs to be blown up and reinvented—not exactly what I’d expected to hear from a guy who runs an advertising agency that counts Suzuki, Universal Theme Parks, Capital One, and General Mills among its clients.

jeff-rosenblum-questus-lyons
Courtesy of Questus Partners

“Advertising hasn’t changed since the 1960s,” says Rosenblum, 40, the cofounder of a 50-person agency called Questus that specializes in digital media and just won anAgency of the Year award from iMedia, a publication that tracks the online marketing industry. “But we’re on the verge of a revolution. People are starting to realize that there are more effective ways to build a brand than through advertising.”Rosenblum is so passionate about this that he’s even made a documentary filmThe Naked Brand, in which he bashes his own industry. “My father looked at it and said, `So what’s your master plan here? Because it looks like you’re going to get hoisted with your own petard,’” Rosenblum says. But the son disagrees: he thinks the revolution is coming whether people like it or not, so he might as well become part of the destruction. Leer más “Can Advertising Survive Digital? Yes—By Leaving ‘Mad Men’ Behind”

6 Key Innovation Insights

As part of MLC’s search for best practices in radical innovation (contact us if you have thoughts to share!), I attended the PDMA’s 2010 Global Innovation Conference last week.

One of my highlights was definitely playing with the Spotme networking devices that all attendees received. These hand-held gizmos represent the acceptable face of stalking, enabling you to browse a list of attendees and track relevant people as they move around. It then alerts you every time your target comes within a 25ft radius of you so you can catch them and exchange knowledge. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but it just might be the future of networking.

I also saw some great presentations from General Mills, Corning, Coach, Ashland, Mohan Sawhney, Dan Pink and others. Here are a few of my favorite takeaways:


by  Anna Bird
http://mlcwideangle.exbdblogs.com/2010/10/26/6-key-innovation-insights/

As part of MLC’s search for best practices in radical innovation (contact us if you have thoughts to share!), I attended the PDMA’s 2010 Global Innovation Conference last week.

One of my highlights was definitely playing with the Spotme networking devices that all attendees received.  These hand-held gizmos represent the acceptable face of stalking, enabling you to browse a list of attendees and track relevant people as they move around. It then alerts you every time your target comes within a 25ft radius of you so you can catch them and exchange knowledge. The technology isn’t perfect yet, but it just might be the future of networking.

I also saw some great presentations from General Mills, Corning, Coach, Ashland, Mohan Sawhney, Dan Pink and others.  Here are a few of my favorite takeaways: Leer más “6 Key Innovation Insights”

Cómo convertir las críticas negativas en algo bueno para tu negocio

A las empresas les encantan los comentarios positivos sobre ellas, los comparten en Twitter, los publican en sus webs y los utilizan en sus estrategias de marketing. Pero el problema aparece cuando se enfrentan a un feedback menos complaciente o a clientes enfadados.

No hay ninguna empresa que consiga que el 100% de sus clientes esté satisfecho, por lo que hay que entender qué estás haciendo mal y aprender de la experiencia que te ofrecen estos clientes descontentos. Susan Payton ha contado a Mashable algunas formas de conectar con estos clientes.


A las empresas les encantan los comentarios positivos sobre ellas, los comparten en Twitter, los publican en sus webs y los utilizan en sus estrategias de marketing. Pero el problema aparece cuando se enfrentan a un feedback menos complaciente o a clientes enfadados.

No hay ninguna empresa que consiga que el 100% de sus clientes esté satisfecho, por lo que hay que entender qué estás haciendo mal y aprender de la experiencia que te ofrecen estos clientes descontentos. Susan Payton ha contado a Mashable algunas formas de conectar con estos clientes. Leer más “Cómo convertir las críticas negativas en algo bueno para tu negocio”

Burger King Taps Coke Exec as Global CMO

– Elena Malykhina

Burger King has tapped former Coca-Cola executive Natalia Franco as its evp and global CMO.

Franco, who previously served as vp-global marketing and innovation for Coca-Cola, will oversee the fast-food chain’s product innovation, consumer insights and worldwide brand advertising, the company said in a written statement. She will report to Burger King’s chairman and CEO, John W. Chidsey.


– Elena Malykhina
Burger King has tapped former Coca-Cola executive Natalia Franco as its evp and global CMO.

Franco, who previously served as vp-global marketing and innovation for Coca-Cola, will oversee the fast-food chain’s product innovation, consumer insights and worldwide brand advertising, the company said in a written statement. She will report to Burger King’s chairman and CEO, John W. Chidsey.
Leer más “Burger King Taps Coke Exec as Global CMO”

Nine Tips for Open Innovation


March 14, 2010 Open Innovation
by Stefan Lindegaard
//

Last week, I attended an open innovation session led by General Mills. Among the distributed materials, I found nine tips for open innovation by Peter Erickson, their Sr. VP of Innovation, Technology and Quality.

The tips are based on General Mills’ successful collaborations with external innovators. I like them and since I believe they are universal, I want to share them with the open innovation community. Here they are:

• Create a differentiated opportunity. Be prepared to articulate how your product, idea or technology is unique and better than anything on the market.

Test your innovation. You’ll be able to speak to market interest and consumer or retailer reaction if you’ve previously placed your innovation before these audiences.

• Be selective. Avoid courting multiple corporate partners. Companies want to know you are as dedicated to them as they are to you.

• Find a contact to be your champion. Within a large company it’s essential to have a “tour guide” which is why all of General Mills’  external partners are matched with specific employees.

• Do your homework. Educate yourself on your partner’s key business line, strategies, industry and competitors.

Connect the dots. Make the connection between your innovation and the company’s business model and brand.

• Demonstrate you can deliver. Describe your team’s experience, your innovation’s scalability and any validation needs (e.g. health claims).

• Have a business model in mind. Communicate your desired opportunity but stay flexible.

• Part on good terms. If a company opts to pass on an opportunity, leave the door open to future collaboration.

http://www.15inno.com/2010/03/14/nine-tips-for-open-innovation/

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