GE Healthcare promueve la buena salud a través de redes sociales


La división de General Electric anunció el lanzamiento de una campaña digital que tiene por objetivo promover la buena salud entre los internautas.


Por: ALTONIVEL | altonivel.com.mx
Twitter: 
@altonivel

GE Healthcare dio a conocer una campaña de redes socialesque tiene por objetivo promover la concientización sobre laprevención del cáncer.

Durante las siguientes seis semanas la campaña «#GetFit”, alentará a los internautas a compartir por medio de Twitter susactividades en materia de salud y actividad física, además de las medidas que toman para reducir sus probabilidades de desarrollar cáncer.

“La prevención y la participación activa en nuestra propia salud son los primeros pasos para mejorar los resultados de la misma”, indicó John Dineen, Presidente y Directivo de GE Healthcare. “Aprovechar el poder de los juegos y de las redes sociales para fomentar estilos de vida que puedan ayudar a prevenir el cáncer no es sólo una buena idea, es parte de nuestro compromiso, por el cual ofrecemos contenido práctico sobre salud a nuestros consumidores y empleados». Continuar leyendo «GE Healthcare promueve la buena salud a través de redes sociales»

Forbes nombró a Steve Ballmer como el peor CEO entre las empresas públicas de EE.UU.


Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, presents his pre...


ieco.clarin.com

Para la revista, el CEO de Microsoft es el que menos merece su sueldo: «Sacó a Microsoft de los nichos de mayor crecimiento y rentabilidad en el sector tecnológico». Los gerentes de Cisco y de General Electric tampoco aprobaron el test.

Según la revista Forbes, el CEO de Microsoft, Steve Ballmer, es el que menos merece su sueldo entre las grandes empresas estadounidenses de capital público: «Sacó a Microsoft de los nichos de mayor crecimiento y rentabilidad en el sector tecnológico (música móvil, dispositivos móviles y tabletas). Mientras lo hacía sacrificó el crecimiento y los beneficios de su empresa y del ecosistema, en el que figuran empresas como Dell, Hewlett Packard y hasta Nokia». Continuar leyendo «Forbes nombró a Steve Ballmer como el peor CEO entre las empresas públicas de EE.UU.»

Experience Trumps Theory: Reviving the Apprenticeship Model

Once upon a time, we learned only by doing. A quality education meant finding an expert to take you under his or her wing. Whether you wanted to be a blacksmith or a shoemaker, the ultimate break was ultimately a relationship. In exchange, your capacity would be stretched. You would learn in real-time, soaking up the knowledge through trial and error. You would learn the trade in practice rather than theory. You would also build a network and gain respect based on your performance rather than any sort of degree.This era of apprenticeship is now largely a relic of history. Somewhere along the line we decided to economize and scale education. Given the time-intensive and intimate nature of apprenticeships, we sought to train more people at once with a streamlined curriculum. As we moved more and more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field. We traded experiential learning for a more standardized but less potent education.

I believe the classroom underserves us. We become dissuaded by theoretical lessons, disenchanted teachers, and a reward system that is all about the grade and not at all about the trade. If experiential education is so important, why don’t we give college credits for what happens outside the classroom?

As we moved more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field.

Unfortunately, undergraduate education is centered on the classroom experience and takes extracurricular activities (clubs, etc.) as an
afterthought. Many schools provide credit for internships, but they don’t stress them as an integrated aspect of the overall program. What’s more, the schools usually play little to no role in coordinating the internships, so it’s very hit or miss: A student could have a life-changing experience, or spend a semester fetching coffee and sitting on the sidelines.

Most of the passionate creative people I have met are motivated more by a genuine interest than by money. We are driven by our pursuit of an expertise in what fascinates us. The Holy Grail for most creative careers is becoming a leader in your interests and making an impact. Experiential on-the-job learning is the most natural conduit for developing such an expertise.


Once upon a time, we learned only by doing. A quality education meant finding an expert to take you under his or her wing. Whether you wanted to be a blacksmith or a shoemaker, the ultimate break was ultimately a relationship. In exchange, your capacity would be stretched. You would learn in real-time, soaking up the knowledge through trial and error. You would learn the trade in practice rather than theory. You would also build a network and gain respect based on your performance rather than any sort of degree.This era of apprenticeship is now largely a relic of history. Somewhere along the line we decided to economize and scale education. Given the time-intensive and intimate nature of apprenticeships, we sought to train more people at once with a streamlined curriculum. As we moved more and more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field. We traded experiential learning for a more standardized but less potent education.

I believe the classroom underserves us. We become dissuaded by theoretical lessons, disenchanted teachers, and a reward system that is all about the grade and not at all about the trade. If experiential education is so important, why don’t we give college credits for what happens outside the classroom?

As we moved more learning into the classroom, we compromised the intense learning that happened in the field.

Unfortunately, undergraduate education is centered on the classroom experience and takes extracurricular activities (clubs, etc.) as an
afterthought. Many schools provide credit for internships, but they don’t stress them as an integrated aspect of the overall program. What’s more, the schools usually play little to no role in coordinating the internships, so it’s very hit or miss: A student could have a life-changing experience, or spend a semester fetching coffee and sitting on the sidelines.

Most of the passionate creative people I have met are motivated more by a genuine interest than by money. We are driven by our pursuit of an expertise in what fascinates us. The Holy Grail for most creative careers is becoming a leader in your interests and making an impact.  Experiential on-the-job learning is the most natural conduit for developing such an expertise.
Continuar leyendo «Experience Trumps Theory: Reviving the Apprenticeship Model»

Building a Marketing Strategy for Innovation Efforts

We’ve covered features, and the spectrum of innovation initiatives in our previous posts, so now let’s touch on a topic central to successful idea or innovation challenges- marketing. Properly implemented, marketing will ensure a robust social community is developed and most importantly, sustained.

It’s important to define and understand the target audience of an individual campaign or idea generating initiative before beginning any marketing effort. In general, campaigns will be either internal, employee-facing campaigns, or externally-facing to customers, targeted groups, or the general public.

Used internally, campaigns leverage the collective wisdom of employees to drive innovation. This can happen among small, cross-functional, groups, entire departments, or company-wide. Marketing a campaign to an internal audience should be targeted, utilizing existing channels of communication such as intranet portals and direct email communications. Take into account the role and functions of employees to determine the most effective means of communication—the marketing approach for factory-floor workers, for example, might be different than for software product managers.

When using idea management tools to power a public-facing campaign or initiative, it’s important to narrow down who the audience will be (much like determining targeted vs. broad-spectrum campaigns) to focus efforts and still stay as broad as possible to encourage maximum participation. Identifying where the audience can be reached—social networks, blogs, through print advertising, etc. – setting a budget, and setting and communicating expectations internally are all key factors to developing a productive community with active, sustained participation.

Here are some ways to think about how to market an ideation site campaign, and real-world examples of successful initiatives, broken down into three categories: Big Splash, Continuous Communication, and Get Creative.


by James Pasmantier

Marketing StrategyWe’ve covered features, and the spectrum of innovation initiatives in our previous posts, so now let’s touch on a topic central to successful idea or innovation challenges- marketing. Properly implemented, marketing will ensure a robust social community is developed and most importantly, sustained.

It’s important to define and understand the target audience of an individual campaign or idea generating initiative before beginning any marketing effort. In general, campaigns will be either internal, employee-facing campaigns, or externally-facing to customers, targeted groups, or the general public.

Used internally, campaigns leverage the collective wisdom of employees to drive innovation. This can happen among small, cross-functional, groups, entire departments, or company-wide. Marketing a campaign to an internal audience should be targeted, utilizing existing channels of communication such as intranet portals and direct email communications. Take into account the role and functions of employees to determine the most effective means of communication—the marketing approach for factory-floor workers, for example, might be different than for software product managers.

When using idea management tools to power a public-facing campaign or initiative, it’s important to narrow down who the audience will be (much like determining targeted vs. broad-spectrum campaigns) to focus efforts and still stay as broad as possible to encourage maximum participation. Identifying where the audience can be reached—social networks, blogs, through print advertising, etc. – setting a budget, and setting and communicating expectations internally are all key factors to developing a productive community with active, sustained participation.

Here are some ways to think about how to market an ideation site campaign, and real-world examples of successful initiatives, broken down into three categories: Big Splash, Continuous Communication, and Get Creative. Continuar leyendo «Building a Marketing Strategy for Innovation Efforts»

Should You Fire Innovation Managers? | 15inno


Paul Hobcraft tries to avoid this option of suggesting moving on until he understands the more often than not complex issues surrounding these lack of commitments seemingly laid at the door of top management. He argues that this advice of leaving is perhaps a little offhand and too easy to offer.

This is a valid point and Paul backs it up with several other good insights. You should check out his comments. However, I still think many people stay at companies too long for the wrong reasons that most often are financially driven.

Of course, it is hard to just quit a job when you have mortgages to pay and kids to feed, but I believe many people would be happier in different places and a key reason for not moving on is that they get staid and stuck where they are. This is meant as a general thing that goes beyond frustrated innovation leaders.

Peter Kuyt argues that a culture that stimulates playing it safe and keeping the status quo is what prevents companies from opening up their innovation process. It is also the same culture that makes people stay too long on their job. It just becomes too hard for them to leave their own comfort zone and so they contribute to a culture of playing it safe.

Peter says that the funny thing is that if people manage to untie themselves from this environment and switch jobs anyway, they are doing their employer a favour as well, by forcing them to bring in fresh new people. These new employees usually influence the status quo much easier than the ‘veterans’.

I like the questions Peter also raised in his comment. Should a program to spin out employees be part of an open innovation strategy? Or even better, an exchange program?

I agree that it is too hard for people to leave their comfort zone and thus we should not always blame the company for creating a less dynamic culture. This got me thinking about Jack Welch, the very successful CEO at General Electric from 1981 to 2001, who fired the bottom 10% of his managers every year.

I don’t like such structured programs where you have to kick out people just to meet a number, but I think many companies can benefit by having programs that assesses the quality of their innovation managers and ensures that a necessary renewal takes place.

You might find better innovation managers internally which is one reason that I like the idea of exchange programs. If you expose your innovation managers to the challenges of other managers and vice versa you not only begin building a stronger innovation culture. You also identify more people who can play a key role on innovation.

If you want to go all the way, then you can also consider exchange programs with partners in your ecosystem…

vía Should You Fire Innovation Managers? | 15inno.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Employee Benefits


Domino's Pizza UK & IRL plc
Image via Wikipedia

– Noreen O’Leary
In the battle to win over consumers during difficult economic times, marketers are sending their employees to the front lines. The trend seems to be accelerating. Last week, Zappos introduced a new pitch with puppets fronting actual recordings of employee customer service calls. Last month, Lowe’s launched a campaign with store associates advising cash-strapped DIY consumers.

Those campaigns come after several others celebrating the rank and file. Over the past year or so, Southwest Airlines, Ford, Domino’s, Bank of America, General Electric, Exxon Mobile and Verizon have featured staffers or actors playing them.

The use of workers to humanize corporate entities has been a time-honored marketing tradition, of course. But in an era of Web 2.0 transparency, their visibility takes on greater meaning, signaling the higher importance of customer service in the marketing mix. More subliminally, as America’s battered consumers have lost faith in the institutions they hold responsible for the current economic mess—and anger toward corporations behind massive layoffs—staffers offer a kind of peer credibility as corporate advocates.

Companies whose images had taken a public flogging often made use of the tactic.  Bank of America used associates in blunt, no-frills ads with the unscripted spots addressing “stressed” consumers, those who had lost their jobs and others just trying to survive. “We weren’t there to sell to them, but just to let them know we were trying to work with them,” explained Meredith Verdone, BofA brand and advertising executive. “The reaction we got was how it humanized the bank, which was important to rebuilding trust.”

Last summer, General Electric employees personified CEO Jeff Immelt’s public remarks about the imperative for American manufacturing renewal. In commercials like “Wrench,” GE staffers from its aircraft, engine, healthcare and energy businesses participated in a relay toss of a wrench around their respective units, with a voiceover describing GE as a company creating “innovation today for America’s tomorrow.” Said Judy Hu, GE global executive director, advertising and branding: “We focused on the idea that we innovate with technological solutions to solve the world’s toughest challenges, but what we do everyday is just as important.” Continuar leyendo «Employee Benefits»

Big Biz Embracing Twitter


– Mark Dolliver, Adweek
Fortune 500 companies got into the Twittering act in a big way last year, according to a study released by the Society for New Communications Research.

Thirty-five percent of Fortune 500 corporations had an active Twitter account as of last year (i.e., one with a post within the past 30 days), according to the study. Among the top 100 companies on the roster, 47 percent had a Twitter account. Twenty-two percent of all Fortune 500 companies had a «public-facing corporate blog,» and more than eight in 10 of those linked directly to a corporate Twitter account.
Continuar leyendo «Big Biz Embracing Twitter»

GENTE COSMO

LIFESTYLE - by Esther Herrero

Being Your Brand

Branding and Strategy for Business and Life

Cruces, Sol y La Imaginación

Cuando la imaginación y la creatividad suman infinito

tranquicomix

fanzine bejarano de historietas hecho en los 80

A Stairway To Fashion

imagination is the key

Vinod833's Blog

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

Apasionada de las Redes Sociales

Compartir conocimientos 2.0 y Marketing Online

Zona de Promesas

Blog de Tecnología en Español - Internet - Redes Sociales - Entrepreneurship - Innovación

Top Master | Blog

LOS PROGRAMAS DE MBA Y POSTGRADO MAS INFLUYENTES DE TODO EL MUNDO

La realidad alterna

Poesías, relatos, diario de sueños

Unencumbered by Facts

Taking unsubstantiation to new levels

PsicoEmocions Blog

Un Pont entre la Psique i les Emocions

TEA PTLS NACHO

AUTISMO.TEA..PTLS

Comunicación & Marketing

De Lilian Lanzieri

Xtratexia

Dirección estratégica para la vida

StellarHIRE Partners

Founding Partner, StellarHire Partners - Executive Search Consultants. Recent engagements include Eloqua, SFDC, Tibco and Veeam.

ivanbrunpr's Blog

4 out of 5 dentists recommend this WordPress.com site

BLOGTEC

Noticias de Tecnologia.

T a l e n t o  en  E x p a n s i ó n

Gestión de personas y transformación digital para las organizaciones líderes de la Era del Conocimiento

Two Leaves Tea SPAIN

Great Organic Tea! ✫✫✫✫✫ Te Organico en Piramides

Ideas para la clase

Experiencias creativas en la clase de español.

Little Grey Box

Travel Well

No solo los 80's

La mejor música de la historia

Molly Balloon's Blog

Identity + Dressing + Colour

El OJO PUBLICO. / Глаз общественности

Ver para contar & contar para ver. / Чтобы рассказать

Think Creative Idea Growth Hacking

Expertos en estrategia y auditoria de marketing

The Coaching Alliance

El camino hacia el éxito

Erick Lovera

Mi Pasión en un Blog

Estampas de México.

“Un fotógrafo tiene que ser auténtico y en su obra, debe expresar emociones, provocar reacciones y despertar pasiones.” ~ Javier García-Moreno E.

Natalia Gómez del Pozuelo

Escritora y formadora en comunicación

aloyn

Alimentación, ocio y negocios, ALOYN, es un Grupo dirigido a Directivos y Propietarios de empresas, interesados en el mundo de la industria de alimentación y bebidas. Tanto por la parte de la industria productora como por la parte de la industria consumidora y/o distribuidora (Distribución Comercial, Horeca, Vending, Venta Directa, etc). También nos interesan las actividades ligadas al agroturismo y el enoturismo como magníficas actividades de promoción y difusión de la cultura gastronómica.

Blog de Jack Moreno

Un blog de Joaquín Moreno sobre recursos, literatura y ciencia ficción

Mashamour

Ensalada de Manjares

be.blog

be. Intelligent Multimedia Education

~~Mente en Gravedad~~

************************************************************************************************************

The Xtyle

Fashion Blog - Un Blog de Moda y Tendencias by Bárbara Sanz Esteban

aníbal goicochea

Tecnologías de la Información y Estrategia

A Waterfall of Sound

"Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words." Robert Frost

Health & Family

A healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit

Style & Design

Fashion Trends and News

U.S.

News, Headlines, Stories, Video from Around the Nation

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: