To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose


 Gabriel Catalano human being | #INperfeccion® a way to find new insight & perspectives

Values must support your organization’s purpose and desired future. Ask first, “What are our values?” Then ask, “Do our values enable us to fulfill our purpose and our potential?

“Vision is a clearly articulated, results-oriented picture of a future you intend to create. It is a dream with direction.” In short, vision is a combination of three basic elements: 1) a significant purpose, reason for existence, 2) a clear picture of the future, and 3) the underlying core values.

In my last two posts, I discussed the elements of purpose and picture of the future. This post focuses on the third element – values.

Our values are our deeply held beliefs about what is right and good, evoking standards that we care deeply about. They drive our behaviors and decisions, trigger our emotions, and can fuel a passion that drives commitment, even in the face of obstacles and change.

An engaging vision, one that captures our hearts, does so because it clearly resonates with our core values. When a group of people discover they share the same values, there is a significant increase in energy, commitment and trust.

Values must support purpose…   Leer más “To Create an Enduring Vision, Values Must Support Purpose”

Four Innovation Predictions for 2011

For those of you who receive our newsletter, these predictions are the same ones we made in our December 2010 edition. For those who don’t know about the newsletter or our yearly predictions about innovation, please read ahead.

Keeping with the publishing traditions that demand that most articles in December relate to a “top ten” list from the year just past or predictions about the near future, each year we boldly stake out several predictions about the future of innovation. Each year we also recap the predictions we got right, and wrong, from the previous year. For 2011, we’re making the following predictions about innovation:

1. Ideas come from everywhere – “open” innovation is ubiquitous
2. Experience is more important than product – the outcomes change from new products to new experiences
3. Timeframes shorten – while organizations are getting better at generating ideas, the timeframe from idea to commercialization hasn’t changed.
4. Creativity re-enters the workforce.

Let’s look at each of these in turn and describe why we think they’ll occur and why they matter…


Thnxs to Blogging Innovation | http://www.business-strategy-innovation.com
Hosted by
Braden Kelley

 

by Jeffrey Phillips

Four Innovation Predictions for 2011For those of you who receive our newsletter, these predictions are the same ones we made in our December 2010 edition. For those who don’t know about the newsletter or our yearly predictions about innovation, please read ahead.

Keeping with the publishing traditions that demand that most articles in December relate to a “top ten” list from the year just past or predictions about the near future, each year we boldly stake out several predictions about the future of innovation. Each year we also recap the predictions we got right, and wrong, from the previous year. For 2011, we’re making the following predictions about innovation:

  1. Ideas come from everywhere – “open” innovation is ubiquitous
  2. Experience is more important than product – the outcomes change from new products to new experiences
  3. Timeframes shorten – while organizations are getting better at generating ideas, the timeframe from idea to commercialization hasn’t changed.
  4. Creativity re-enters the workforce.

Let’s look at each of these in turn and describe why we think they’ll occur and why they matter… Leer más “Four Innovation Predictions for 2011”

Design Thinking – The Future is unknown? By abaldaia.wordpress.com

Jump into the unknown

As We Know,
There are known knowns.
There are things we know we know.
Also we know
There are known unknowns.
That is to say
We know there are some things
We do not know.
But there are unknown unknowns Also,
The ones we do not know
We do not know.

Donald Rumsfeld

The widespread tendency of people to produce the future based on past data, it is a reality that has caused great disappointment. When we extrapolate from the past to predict the future and given the recent experiences, we cannot think of creating a different and better future.

The hard concept that “you cannot measure it does not matter, because it cannot be managed” disrupts and prevents imagination and the creation of new ideas.

The world is full of unknown things, of hidden needs that exist but that neither we nor the companies consumers or users know or articulate.

But innovation is only possible when we challenge and question the rule that the best way is to try to find the best possible answer to a problem. Finding opportunity becomes more important than solving problems, which leads to responses that did not exist before.

What are the most sensitive points in the day-to-day lives and how to get information about it?

The opportunity to respond to the whole rather than ad hoc answers is given to us by observation of routines that allows the tacit understanding of background conditions.

This observation should be viewed more like an expedition to the lifestyle of people and companies and held a second set of tracks including the emotional world, language or body language, if applicable.

How to articulate needs in enterprises where the requirements have not been thought of?

The notion of context must be present in the observations so as to identify needs and opportunities, not on the past, but based on what are already relatively in the future.


Por jabaldaia
http://abaldaia.wordpress.com/2010/10/28/design-thinking-the-future-is-unknown/#comment-213

Jump into the unknown

As We Know,
There are known knowns.
There are things we know we know.
Also we know
There are known unknowns.
That is to say
We know there are some things
We do not know.
But there are unknown unknowns Also,
The ones we do not know
We do not know.

Donald Rumsfeld

The widespread tendency of people to produce the future based on past data, it is a reality that has caused great disappointment. When we extrapolate from the past to predict the future and given the recent experiences, we cannot think of creating a different and better future.

The hard concept that “you cannot measure it does not matter, because it cannot be managed” disrupts and prevents imagination and the creation of new ideas.

The world is full of unknown things, of hidden needs that exist but that neither we nor the companies consumers or users know or articulate.

But innovation is only possible when we challenge and question the rule that the best way is to try to find the best possible answer to a problem. Finding opportunity becomes more important than solving problems, which leads to responses that did not exist before.

What are the most sensitive points in the day-to-day lives and how to get information about it?

The opportunity to respond to the whole rather than ad hoc answers is given to us by observation of routines that allows the tacit understanding of background conditions.

This observation should be viewed more like an expedition to the lifestyle of people and companies and held a second set of tracks including the emotional world, language or body language, if applicable.

How to articulate needs in enterprises where the requirements have not been thought of?

The notion of context must be present in the observations so as to identify needs and opportunities, not on the past, but based on what are already relatively in the future. Leer más “Design Thinking – The Future is unknown? By abaldaia.wordpress.com”

A radical pessimist’s guide to the next 10 years

From Saturday’s Globe and Mail

The iconic writer reveals the shape of things to come, with 45 tips for survival and a matching glossary of the new words you’ll need to talk about your messed-up future.

1) It’s going to get worse

No silver linings and no lemonade. The elevator only goes down. The bright note is that the elevator will, at some point, stop.

2) The future isn’t going to feel futuristic

It’s simply going to feel weird and out-of-control-ish, the way it does now, because too many things are changing too quickly. The reason the future feels odd is because of its unpredictability. If the future didn’t feel weirdly unexpected, then something would be wrong.

3) The future is going to happen no matter what we do. The future will feel even faster than it does now

The next sets of triumphing technologies are going to happen, no matter who invents them or where or how. Not that technology alone dictates the future, but in the end it always leaves its mark. The only unknown factor is the pace at which new technologies will appear. This technological determinism, with its sense of constantly awaiting a new era-changing technology every day, is one of the hallmarks of the next decade.

4)Move to Vancouver, San Diego, Shannon or Liverpool

There’ll be just as much freaky extreme weather in these west-coast cities, but at least the west coasts won’t be broiling hot and cryogenically cold.

5) You’ll spend a lot of your time feeling like a dog leashed to a pole outside the grocery store – separation anxiety will become your permanent state

6) The middle class is over. It’s not coming back

Remember travel agents? Remember how they just kind of vanished one day?

That’s where all the other jobs that once made us middle-class are going – to that same, magical, class-killing, job-sucking wormhole into which travel-agency jobs vanished, never to return. However, this won’t stop people from self-identifying as middle-class, and as the years pass we’ll be entering a replay of the antebellum South, when people defined themselves by the social status of their ancestors three generations back. Enjoy the new monoclass!

7) Retail will start to resemble Mexican drugstores

In Mexico, if one wishes to buy a toothbrush, one goes to a drugstore where one of every item for sale is on display inside a glass display case that circles the store. One selects the toothbrush and one of an obvious surplus of staff runs to the back to fetch the toothbrush. It’s not very efficient, but it does offer otherwise unemployed people something to do during the day.

8) Try to live near a subway entrance

In a world of crazy-expensive oil, it’s the only real estate that will hold its value, if not increase.

9) The suburbs are doomed, especially thoseE.T. , California-style suburbs

This is a no-brainer, but the former homes will make amazing hangouts for gangs, weirdoes and people performing illegal activities. The pretend gates at the entranceways to gated communities will become real, and the charred stubs of previous white-collar homes will serve only to make the still-standing structures creepier and more exotic.

10) In the same way you can never go backward to a slower computer, you can never go backward to a lessened state of connectedness

11) Old people won’t be quite so clueless

No more “the Google,” because they’ll be just that little bit younger.

12) Expect less

Not zero, just less.

13) Enjoy lettuce while you still can

And anything else that arrives in your life from a truck, for that matter. For vegetables, get used to whatever it is they served in railway hotels in the 1890s. Jams. Preserves. Pickled everything.


FOCUS
Douglas Coupland
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/a-radical-pessimists-guide-to-the-next-10-years/article1750609/singlepage/#articlecontent

From Saturday’s Globe and Mail
Coupland’s glossary of new terms (important)

The iconic writer reveals the shape of things to come, with 45 tips for survival and a matching glossary of the new words you’ll need to talk about your messed-up future.

1) It’s going to get worse

No silver linings and no lemonade. The elevator only goes down. The bright note is that the elevator will, at some point, stop.

 

2) The future isn’t going to feel futuristic

It’s simply going to feel weird and out-of-control-ish, the way it does now, because too many things are changing too quickly. The reason the future feels odd is because of its unpredictability. If the future didn’t feel weirdly unexpected, then something would be wrong.

3) The future is going to happen no matter what we do. The future will feel even faster than it does now

The next sets of triumphing technologies are going to happen, no matter who invents them or where or how. Not that technology alone dictates the future, but in the end it always leaves its mark. The only unknown factor is the pace at which new technologies will appear. This technological determinism, with its sense of constantly awaiting a new era-changing technology every day, is one of the hallmarks of the next decade.

4)Move to Vancouver, San Diego, Shannon or Liverpool

There’ll be just as much freaky extreme weather in these west-coast cities, but at least the west coasts won’t be broiling hot and cryogenically cold.

5) You’ll spend a lot of your time feeling like a dog leashed to a pole outside the grocery store – separation anxiety will become your permanent state

6) The middle class is over. It’s not coming back

Remember travel agents? Remember how they just kind of vanished one day?

That’s where all the other jobs that once made us middle-class are going – to that same, magical, class-killing, job-sucking wormhole into which travel-agency jobs vanished, never to return. However, this won’t stop people from self-identifying as middle-class, and as the years pass we’ll be entering a replay of the antebellum South, when people defined themselves by the social status of their ancestors three generations back. Enjoy the new monoclass!

7) Retail will start to resemble Mexican drugstores

In Mexico, if one wishes to buy a toothbrush, one goes to a drugstore where one of every item for sale is on display inside a glass display case that circles the store. One selects the toothbrush and one of an obvious surplus of staff runs to the back to fetch the toothbrush. It’s not very efficient, but it does offer otherwise unemployed people something to do during the day.

8) Try to live near a subway entrance

In a world of crazy-expensive oil, it’s the only real estate that will hold its value, if not increase.

9) The suburbs are doomed, especially thoseE.T. , California-style suburbs

This is a no-brainer, but the former homes will make amazing hangouts for gangs, weirdoes and people performing illegal activities. The pretend gates at the entranceways to gated communities will become real, and the charred stubs of previous white-collar homes will serve only to make the still-standing structures creepier and more exotic.

10) In the same way you can never go backward to a slower computer, you can never go backward to a lessened state of connectedness

11) Old people won’t be quite so clueless

No more “the Google,” because they’ll be just that little bit younger.

12) Expect less

Not zero, just less.

13) Enjoy lettuce while you still can

And anything else that arrives in your life from a truck, for that matter. For vegetables, get used to whatever it is they served in railway hotels in the 1890s. Jams. Preserves. Pickled everything. Leer más “A radical pessimist’s guide to the next 10 years”

Innovation does not start with idea generation

I’ve just finished reading a book called Intangible Capital (more on that in another post) by Mary Adams. The book does a good job describing the value and importance of knowledge, intellectual property and other intangible assets, and why innovation is key to the creation of those assets.

But that’s not the subject of today’s post. Today’s post deals with the fallacy that innovation “starts” with idea generation. I’m picking on Mary’s book because it was at hand and the latest to suggest that innovation starts with idea generation. I know this because it says so on page 85, but Mary’s writing does not stand alone. Far too often I hear people suggest or read that innovation starts with idea generation. Sorry, no – and my apologies in advance to Mary for calling out this small problem in what was otherwise a very good book.


Jeffrey Phillips

I’ve just finished reading a book called Intangible Capital (more on that in another post) by Mary Adams.  The book does a good job describing the value and importance of knowledge, intellectual property and other intangible assets, and why innovation is key to the creation of those assets.

But that’s not the subject of today’s post.  Today’s post deals with the fallacy that innovation “starts” with idea generation.  I’m picking on Mary’s book because it was at hand and the latest to suggest that innovation starts with idea generation.  I know this because it says so on page 85, but Mary’s writing does not stand alone.  Far too often I hear people suggest or read that innovation starts with idea generation.  Sorry, no – and my apologies in advance to Mary for calling out this small problem in what was otherwise a very good book.

Leer más “Innovation does not start with idea generation”

It’s not going to happen here?

In countries like Mexico, new ways of doing business don’t get adopted until very late in the game (years later!) where the approach has been turned into a winning algorithm by someone else on another part of the world (See Groupon). Being the first to market doesn’t mean you’ll win the game, building a better business model does. And this depends more on a unique insight you found that feeds your point of view and not someone else’s.

Saying that a certain trend won’t affect you is really saying that you and organization don’t care if you become irrelevant. Your role in the future is simply not important. Why not increase the rate of change where you are and force your competitors to adopt to you? Why not shape the ecosystem and position yourself as the apex? Why wait?


‘That’s not going to happen here’. This is one of the claims I hear a lot here in Mexico, whatever trends are happening elsewhere are not going to happen here anytime soon.

They talks as if Mexico were isolated from the rest of the trends of society. First of all if you’re in a country where there’s internet access, you’re going to be affected sooner than later. Saying ‘that’s not going to happen’ here is a clear signal that you or your organization has no point of view whatsoever about the future, you have a no-sight trap. You merely react to what happens, and by that time you’re way behind the times. Also by design, all your strategies will be copycats of others because your point of view stands for nothing more of the same. That’s why it’s important to have your own point of view instead of participating in mindless copycatting and doing what the guy next door does. Leer más “It’s not going to happen here?”

Using Networks to Find Knowledge

As you can see, effectively using the knowledge of the business means trying to get better connections to reduce the size of the “I don’t know who to ask” space.

So how can we do this? One possibility is that we direct our questions to people in the organization that we know are very highly connected. However, one simulaiton study of search in a real organizational network has found that this might result in more steps needed to find the right person. In this simulation, a slightly more efficient search could be conducted by going to the manager who is responsible for the subject area that is being investigated or by starting the search in the right department.


Last week Ralph Ohr left me with a challenge to think about how to use experts to get the best outcomes on making decisions under conditions of uncertainty. We constantly miss disruptive changes in the operating environment and I suppose if I really knew the answer, I wouldn’t be posting it on a blog.

Sometimes predictions are genuinely impossible because of true uncertainty. The future is the future and nothing in the past can help us predict some events. Rather than making predicitons, operational flexibility is probably the best response to this type of uncertaintly.

On the other hand, sometimes the emerging disruptions are right under our noses and the problem is getting over myopia. Experts can suffer from myopia as well as the rest of us so perhaps the issue is finding the right expert with the right interpretation of what is happening. Leer más “Using Networks to Find Knowledge”