4 Keys to a Great Non-Profit Website

Too often, NGOs settle for web presences that merely check-the-box without regard to whether or not the site is capable of meeting the organization’s goals. After all, every dollar not spent on programming is a dollar that isn’t directly contributing to the core mission. Furthermore, because the immediate ROI of a web presence is hard to calculate, unlike, say, events and mailers, justifying the expense can be difficult.

Regardless, a stand out website is an absolutely critical tool for any modern non-profit. It is often the only opportunity for the organization to explain their story and activate their supporters. If your site can’t demonstrate the power of your mission – if it can’t push a stranger over the hump of inertia to contribute their time, their money, or their voice, then it isn’t helping the cause.

Given the importance of the website, it’s important that it is done right. To help, we’ve narrowed down the key needs for any non-profit site and provided some best-in-class examples of sites that do a great job delivering against them.
1. Story

How do you get people excited about the mission?

No one needs to support a charity; they do it out of their personal morality and conviction. Obviously, there are many worthy causes competing for their resources so donors must select the ones they feel are most worthy. This process is largely an emotional decision, not a rational one. Since stories are how we communicate complex emotions and ideas, it is absolutely critical to make sure that your story comes across in an impactful way. Visitors need to feel the emotional force behind your cause.

Who are you trying to help? Why do they need you? Why have you, the charity or the founder, taken up this gauntlet?

FallingWhistles, a non-profit dedicated to speaking out against the Congolese war and the use of child soldiers does an excellent job communicating their story. Not only does the site open with a powerfully directed short film, but also an entire section is dedicated to the founder’s journal, a powerful first-hand account of his horrific journey through the Congo.

Falling Whistles uses an actual whistle as a symbol of both the plight of child soldiers and the group’s action to stop it.

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Too often, NGOs settle for web presences that merely check-the-box without regard to whether or not the site is capable of meeting the organization’s goals.  After all, every dollar not spent on programming is a dollar that isn’t directly contributing to the core mission.  Furthermore, because the immediate ROI of a web presence is hard to calculate, unlike, say, events and mailers, justifying the expense can be difficult.

Regardless, a stand out website is an absolutely critical tool for any modern non-profit.  It is often the only opportunity for the organization to explain their story and activate their supporters.  If your site can’t demonstrate the power of your mission – if it can’t push a stranger over the hump of inertia to contribute their time, their money, or their voice, then it isn’t helping the cause.

Given the importance of the website, it’s important that it is done right. To help, we’ve narrowed down the key needs for any non-profit site and provided some best-in-class examples of sites that do a great job delivering against them.

1. Story

How do you get people excited about the mission?

No one needs to support a charity; they do it out of their personal morality and conviction.  Obviously, there are many worthy causes competing for their resources so donors must select the ones they feel are most worthy.  This process is largely an emotional decision, not a rational one.  Since stories are how we communicate complex emotions and ideas, it is absolutely critical to make sure that your story comes across in an impactful way.  Visitors need to feel the emotional force behind your cause.

Who are you trying to help? Why do they need you?  Why have you, the charity or the founder, taken up this gauntlet?

FallingWhistles, a non-profit dedicated to speaking out against the Congolese war and the use of child soldiers does an excellent job communicating their story.  Not only does the site open with a powerfully directed short film, but also an entire section is dedicated to the founder’s journal, a powerful first-hand account of his horrific journey through the Congo.

Falling Whistles uses an actual whistle as a symbol of both the plight of child soldiers and the group’s action to stop it.

Falling Whistles uses an actual whistle as a symbol of both the plight of child soldiers and the group's action to stop it. Leer más “4 Keys to a Great Non-Profit Website”

Surfing is the new career

by Seth Godin

Three months ago I wrote about farming and hunting. It seems, though, that the growth industry of our generation is surfing.

Talk to surfers and they’ll explain that the entire sport comes down to the hunt for that blissful moment that combines three unstable elements in combination: the wave is just a little too big to handle, the board is going just a little too fast, and the ride could end at any moment.


by Seth Godin

Three months ago I wrote about farming and hunting. It seems, though, that the growth industry of our generation is surfing.

This makes for a great sport (for some people, anyway) but until recently, it wasn’t much of a career path. (aside: Aimless web surfing is a waste of time, and that’s not the sort of surfing I’m referring to). That feeling of freedom and risk in equal measure was difficult to find at work, so we sought it out on the slopes or the ocean. Leer más “Surfing is the new career”