Six Ways to Avoid Blowing Your Job Interview

By Jay Hofmeister

handshake interview 150For nearly five months, I’ve been trying to fill a few positions at our human capital firm, and along the way I’ve learned quite a lot about the many ways job candidates can blow their job prospects—obvious and not so obvious. In this still-challenging economy, it is not what the company can do for you, but what value you bring to the company. You should focus addressing any issues that could keep your candidacy from moving forward, and try NOT to shoot yourself in the foot with one of these moves.
Being Arrogant

Hiring managers want people who are confident—but most also want team players who work well in groups. There is a very fine line when it comes expressing confidence in an interview and what hiring managers see as being arrogant or cocky. Candidates blow their chances when they continually refer to projects they were involved in with the word I. One candidate recently crossed himself off the list by saying he couldn’t stand working with people from West Virginia—obviously, he thought West Virginians were not as smart as he is.
Trying to reinvent the job…


handshake interview 150For nearly five months, I’ve been trying to fill a few positions at our human capital firm, and along the way I’ve learned quite a lot about the many ways job candidates can blow their job prospects—obvious and not so obvious. In this still-challenging economy, it is not what the company can do for you, but what value you bring to the company. You should focus addressing any issues that could keep your candidacy from moving forward, and try NOT to shoot yourself in the foot with one of these moves.

Being Arrogant

Hiring managers want people who are confident—but most also want team players who work well in groups. There is a very fine line when it comes expressing confidence in an interview and what hiring managers see as being arrogant or cocky. Candidates blow their chances when they continually refer to projects they were involved in with the word I. One candidate recently crossed himself off the list by saying he couldn’t stand working with people from West Virginia—obviously, he thought West Virginians were not as smart as he is.

Trying to reinvent the job… Leer más “Six Ways to Avoid Blowing Your Job Interview”

Why I Don’t Believe in Social Media

Jose Palomino is President of g2m Group, Inc, and author of Value Prop; he blogs at StrategicPropositions.com.

Some of my clients are smaller, more traditional businesses, not necessarily Fortune 500 companies. So, when it comes to discussing social media with them, their regular refrain to me is ‘I just don’t believe in that social media stuff’ or ‘I don’t see how it can benefit me’. This has nothing to do with their education or how savvy they are as business people – it’s a sincere belief which is really this question: ‘Can social media help us?’. So why don’t they believe they can benefit from social media? Read on to find out.

So why don’t they believe they can benefit from social media? Two reasons, I think:
1.) They think they are too small;
2.) They don’t think that they have anything interesting to share. In a broader sense they are asking ‘Would I even read about stuff that I’d write about?’


Posted by Neil Vidyarthi

JOSEPALOMINOLOGO Jose Palomino is President of g2m Group, Inc, and author of Value Prop; he blogs at StrategicPropositions.com.

Some of my clients are smaller, more traditional businesses, not necessarily Fortune 500 companies. So, when it comes to discussing social media with them, their regular refrain to me is ‘I just don’t believe in that social media stuff’ or ‘I don’t see how it can benefit me’. This has nothing to do with their education or how savvy they are as business people – it’s a sincere belief which is really this question: ‘Can social media help us?’.  So why don’t they believe they can benefit from social media? Read on to find out.

So why don’t they believe they can benefit from social media?  Two reasons, I think:
1.) They think they are too small;
2.) They don’t think that they have anything interesting to share. In a broader sense they are asking ‘Would I even read about stuff that I’d write about?’ Leer más “Why I Don’t Believe in Social Media”

How Social are the Fortune 100?


Two recent studies, with interesting visualizations, take a look at the sociability of the Fortune 100. (h/t Daniel Brenikov for the links)

Disclosure: Many of the more social companies are Ogilvy clients.

The consultancy iStrategy created an infographic to help visualize data on the Fortune 100’s social savvy.

NetProspex has another take with a chart of the top 50 companies on Social Media.

http://www.asiadigitalmap.com/

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Innovation Failure Points – Strangled in the Crib

Submitted by Blogging Innovation

by Jeffrey Phillips

Innovation Failure Points – Strangled in the CribI am going to start a multi-part post today thinking about innovation’s failure points. Too often all we hear about are the innovation successes, yet if the statistics are right, there are far more “failures” than successes. I believe it is more interesting and more informative to consider the failures rather than the successes, in that every failure is instructive, while most successes are situational.

So, rather than looking at a successful result and assuming the process was valid, let’s consider innovation as a series of interconnected links, and find the likely failure points for innovation in that chain. As we look at weak links in the innovation chain our first stop is at the beginning.


Submitted by Blogging Innovation

by Jeffrey Phillips

Innovation Failure Points - Strangled in the CribI am going to start a multi-part post today thinking about innovation’s failure points. Too often all we hear about are the innovation successes, yet if the statistics are right, there are far more “failures” than successes. I believe it is more interesting and more informative to consider the failures rather than the successes, in that every failure is instructive, while most successes are situational.

So, rather than looking at a successful result and assuming the process was valid, let’s consider innovation as a series of interconnected links, and find the likely failure points for innovation in that chain. As we look at weak links in the innovation chain our first stop is at the beginning. Leer más “Innovation Failure Points – Strangled in the Crib”

E-Mail Named Tops for ‘Targeting’


– Mark Dolliver, Adweek
A newly released Datran Media survey of executives at Fortune 500 companies, publishing companies, media agencies and ad agencies finds e-mail and search regarded as the digital channels that worked best last year.

Conducted in December in conjunction with the Direct Marketing Association E-mail Experience Council “and other media partners,” the survey asked respondents to identify the digital channels that “performed the strongest for your company in 2009.” E-mail got the most mentions (cited by 39 percent), followed by search (24 percent), offline (9 percent), affiliate marketing (9 percent), display (7 percent), direct mail (6 percent), social media (5 percent) and mobile (1 percent).

Another part of the survey inquired into the objectives these executives have for their online efforts. “Reaching a target audience” topped the list (cited by 84 percent), followed by “generating high-quality leads” (74 percent). Smaller majorities said they’re using online efforts for “converting leads into sales” (63 percent), “measuring and understanding our audience” (60 percent), “retaining existing customers” (57 percent) and/or “digitally transacting with customers” (54 percent). Consistent with the interest in reaching a target audience, respondents put “targeting” atop the list of online “marketing tactics” they’ll be using this year as part of their online strategy.

When it comes to measuring consumer response to their digital efforts, what do the respondents’ companies currently look at? “Clicks” got the most mentions (72 percent), trailed by “conversions” (59 percent) and “impressions” (58 percent). Lagging farther behind were “transactions” and “audience” (43 percent apiece).

Elsewhere in the survey, 67 percent of respondents said they’ll be “leveraging online video this year.” As for social media, opinion was mixed on the question of whether it will “generate quantifiable results in 2010.” Fifty percent of respondents said they think it will, but 12 percent said it won’t and the rest were unsure.

http://www.brandweek.com/bw/content_display/news-and-features/direct/e3ia1e34a9eb6562e5bdee985a9fa26607b

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Big Biz Embracing Twitter


– Mark Dolliver, Adweek
Fortune 500 companies got into the Twittering act in a big way last year, according to a study released by the Society for New Communications Research.

Thirty-five percent of Fortune 500 corporations had an active Twitter account as of last year (i.e., one with a post within the past 30 days), according to the study. Among the top 100 companies on the roster, 47 percent had a Twitter account. Twenty-two percent of all Fortune 500 companies had a “public-facing corporate blog,” and more than eight in 10 of those linked directly to a corporate Twitter account.
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