Why Women Make Better Business Leaders | via One Minute MBA


There’s no question that women are making large strides in U.S. business and technology fields. Today’s generation of women professionals are more likely than any other to found, lead or advise a major U.S. firm. But while women continue to secure increasingly high-level leadership positions, there are still some glaring imbalances. For one, only twelve Fortune 500 companies are now headed by women. And numbers on the proportion of female tech startup founders are not any more encouraging; many high-profile incubators report that women founders receive less than 5% of their annual grant awards.

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But recent research from the Harvard Business Review and others suggests something that most of us already know–firms without women in high-level leadership positions are missing out on some meaningful growth opportunities. According to the research, women that excel in business often prove to have more highly developed communication skills than their male colleagues. Women are also often more likely to take initiative and make changes to the status quo. In fact, the study showed that firms with women on their boards saw 42% higher sales returns, a 66% higher return on invested capital and a 53% higher return on equity over firms that did not.

Learn more about the skills and perspectives that women bring to business by checking out Online MBA’s latest video.

Video Transcript Leer más “Why Women Make Better Business Leaders | via One Minute MBA”

Biggest Kids on the Block Becoming Bigger Fans of Social Media | sloanreview.mit.edu


 

Fortune 500 firms are taking a leap forward in their use of social media, from Facebook to Pinterest.

By Robert Berkman

The very largest corporations in the country — those who make up the Fortune 500 — are showing “the first signs of really embracing a range of social media tools.”

That’s the finding of a study undertaken this past summer by the Charlton College of Business Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Nora Ganim Barnes, the Director of the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and a Chancellor Professor of Marketing, Ava M. Lescault, the Assistant Director / Senior Research Associate at the Center and Justina Andonian, the Social Media Coordinator / Research Assistant at the Center, examined how companies from the 2012 Fortune 500 list were using blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest.

Some of the more interesting findings include the discovery of many more Twitter accounts than blogs among Fortune 500 companies. Many companies are also doing specialty blogging and using their own YouTube channels.

Here are some details:

Blogging: A total of 139 companies, or 28% of the Fortune 500, had blogs. Those in the telecommunications industry had the most (40%); followed by commercial banks, specialty retail and utilities (25-30%). Several industries on the list — forest and paper products, railroads, tobacco, toys/sporting goods, real estate, building materials/glass and trucking and waste management — had no members with blogs.

What are these firms blogging about? While the purposes vary, Barnes says that her research shows that blogs are becoming more popular for branding and thought leadership, with some companies using the forums to discuss social concerns. For example, Exxon Mobil’s Perspectives blog often discusses environmental protection.

TechCrunch | 10 Reasons To Quit Your Job Right Now!


See on Scoop.ithuman being in – perfección

The game is over. That game where they get to hire you for 40 years, pay you far less than you create, and then give you a gold watch, and then you get bored, you get depressed, and you die alone.

It wasn’t that fun of a game anyway.

When I had a corporate job I would wake up depressed. I couldn’t move out of bed. The sun would be coming in. A cat on the fire escape staring at me through the window. Even it was more excited to be alive than me. And, by the way, I had the best job in the world. I interviewed prostitutes for a living at three in the morning.

But they were going to kill me in my cubicle.

In 2009 I asked about 10 Fortune 500 CEOs, “did you just use this crisis as an excuse to fire all the people you were afraid to fire before.” Only one said “of course” instantly. The others had to drink more. But then it was admitted: you’re all dead weight and there’s no loyalty.

We’ve entered the “Choose Yourself” era. The era without middlemen. Without The Other telling you your bonus, your salary, your movie can be made, your book published, your company funded, your life validated. The era where you have to always be planning your escape. Where you create your platforms on twitter, facebook, quora, pinterest, blogging, vlogging, itunes, and wherever else and every day you Create and you Innovate and you Sell for yourself. You Eat what you Kill. And your rewards are commensurate with how sharp your teeth are.

Most people need to begin planning their exit strategy RIGHT NOW: Leer más “TechCrunch | 10 Reasons To Quit Your Job Right Now!”

Infografía: Las 500 empresas de Fortune en Redes Sociales


http://www.informabtl.com

Imagen 7

Estados Unidos.- La empresa de diseño web GO-Gulfpublicó una infografía donde comparte las estadísticas clave de la actividad de las empresas de Fortune 500 en el terreno de Social Media.

Más noticias sobre Social Media:
Redes Sociales: más poderosas que los sites
Crunchéalo, una campaña logra más de 200 mil likes en tiempo récord

Fortune publica  cada año su listado Fortune 500, donde reconoce a las empresas más importantes de todos los sectores. Go-Gulf, empresa de comunicación y diseño web realizó esta infografía donde ofrece datos relevantes sobre el comportamiento de las 500 compañías más importantes del mundo en redes sociales.

En ella se informan datos interesantes:

  • 35% de las 100 compañías más importantes tuvieron un blog corporativo en 2011
  • 62% de las 500 Compañías tienen cuenta activa en Twitter
  • 56% de las empresas tienen página en Facebook

Aquí la infografía para más estadísticas: Leer más “Infografía: Las 500 empresas de Fortune en Redes Sociales”

Social Media: Quality or Quantity?

Quality – of information, of leads, of interactions – helps us focus our efforts and energy in the right places. It makes relationship development a more scalable activity, because we can reach one-to-one or one-to-few more personally than we can one-to-many. It provides a richness and depth of experience, or the feeling of a worthwhile investment, and helps us conceivably derive a better value-to-effort ratio for the things in which we invest our money or brain power.

Quantity, on the other hand, provides us with the field of information, leads, or interactions to draw from. More isn’t always better; 10 outstanding blog posts is arguably better than 50 mediocre ones, and a representative sample is better than a whole pile of garbage data. But some is often better than none, and quantity (even a minimal one) gives us a starting ground for most things. That can be the potential reach of an audience, a field of data with which to at least begin some analysis, or simply a diversity of perspectives upon which to make an informed choice or decision.


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Social Media: Quality or Quantity? - Brass Tack Thinking

In social media, is it quality or quantity that matters?

Yes.

Here’s what I mean.

Quality and quantity, in the cases of many goals and objectives, are inextricably linked. They’re relative, and one can outweigh the other or the scale can be different. But it’s a rare case in business when it’s actually only one or the other.

Quality – of information, of leads, of interactions – helps us focus our efforts and energy in the right places. It makes relationship development a more scalable activity, because we can reach one-to-one or one-to-few more personally than we can one-to-many. It provides a richness and depth of experience, or the feeling of a worthwhile investment, and helps us conceivably derive a better value-to-effort ratio for the things in which we invest our money or brain power.

Quantity, on the other hand, provides us with the field of information, leads, or interactions to draw from. More isn’t always better; 10 outstanding blog posts is arguably better than 50 mediocre ones, and a representative sample is better than a whole pile of garbage data. But some is often better than none, and quantity (even a minimal one) gives us a starting ground for most things. That can be the potential reach of an audience, a field of data with which to at least begin some analysis, or simply a diversity of perspectives upon which to make an informed choice or decision.

The key is to find the point of diminishing returns: when the quality of outcomes is offset or even negatively impacted effort of collecting additional quantity .

That’s not going to be the same for my business as it is for yours. It’s not going to be the same in B2B as it is in B2C or for a nonprofit as it is a Fortune 100 consumer brand. Questions to ask yourself might include:

  • What constitutes a valuable use of one hour of my time consuming content? Is it one big idea that I can implement in the next year? Three small actions I can take next week? Entertaining myself or taking a break from work to rest my mind?
  • What’s the cost (time, technology, or a combination of the two) for me to collect 1,000 email addresses, or 100? How much money do I need to make back from those addresses to have made it worth my while, or is there another outcome or cost savings that I can count as a return?
  • Can I further worthwhile discussions of my cause or point of view if I don’t have a platform upon which to spread them? How big does it need to be to gain traction? How small does it need to remain to feel focused?
  • How much “engagement” can I generate via my social profiles before maintaining that level of interaction won’t scale and will frustrate my community? If they had to choose, would my community prioritize individual attention over speed of information?
  • How many months of data do I need to track to know if my campaign is having the desired results? Am I tracking the data points that tell me something useful, or just tracking lots of them? Leer más “Social Media: Quality or Quantity?”

How To Use the “Seven Deadly Sins” to Turn Visitors into Customers

Since the beginning of time, people have exploited the human desire to sin so that they could achieve their goals. Finding out what causes people to sin helps us understand the triggers which prompt people to take an action. The Web has made it even easier to exploit these tendencies to sin, in order to build user engagement and excitement about your service or product. In this article we’ll show examples of how successful companies exploit the tendency to conduct all the famous Seven Deadly Sins, and in turn generate momentum with their website visitors. Ready? Let’s roll.
Sin #1: Pride

Pride is defined as having an excessively high opinion of oneself. You must remember someone from your school days who had an extremely high sense of their personal appearance or abilities. That’s pride at work. On the Web, this sin will help you sell your product. Every website visitor wants to be associated with a successful service that other people might find impressive.

People want to say: “Yes, Fortune 500 companies use this tool and I use it as well,” or “Yes, I got on the homepage of Dribbble in front of thousands of other designers; that’s the type of work I do.” In all these examples, people are proud of their achievements and the website helps them show their pride. Here are examples of this first sin in action:

Showing off your customers. People want to use tools that big brands use. SEOmoz does a great job of fronting up the logos of famous companies that pay for their tools, with a simple call to action prompting you to be as successful as these top brands. This entices users to try this tool: “I want to use something big brands use.”



Since the beginning of time, people have exploited the human desire to sin so that they could achieve their goals. Finding out what causes people to sin helps us understand the triggers which prompt people to take an action. The Web has made it even easier to exploit these tendencies to sin, in order to build user engagement and excitement about your service or product. In this article we’ll show examples of how successful companies exploit the tendency to conduct all the famous Seven Deadly Sins, and in turn generate momentum with their website visitors. Ready? Let’s roll.

Sin #1: Pride

Pride is defined as having an excessively high opinion of oneself. You must remember someone from your school days who had an extremely high sense of their personal appearance or abilities. That’s pride at work. On the Web, this sin will help you sell your product. Every website visitor wants to be associated with a successful service that other people might find impressive.

People want to say: “Yes, Fortune 500 companies use this tool and I use it as well,” or “Yes, I got on the homepage of Dribbble in front of thousands of other designers; that’s the type of work I do.” In all these examples, people are proud of their achievements and the website helps them show their pride. Here are examples of this first sin in action:

Showing off your customers. People want to use tools that big brands use. SEOmoz does a great job of fronting up the logos of famous companies that pay for their tools, with a simple call to action prompting you to be as successful as these top brands. This entices users to try this tool: “I want to use something big brands use.” Leer más “How To Use the “Seven Deadly Sins” to Turn Visitors into Customers”

The New York Times Is Dead Wrong

But the real issue, I’d submit, goes beyond a “gender gap” in the editorial offices of one newspaper. It speaks to basic questions of life, work, success, and how society (and all of us) measure those attributes.

For example, Who really matters? So much of how we continue to define impact (one reason to deserve a prominent obituary) involves people with high-profile positions in established organizations — big-time lawyers, Fortune 500 executives, investment bankers and money managers.

Yet in an age of huge problems and great flux, many of the people who have a real, game-changing impact are startup founders, social entrepreneurs, community activists, nonprofit leaders — the sorts of innovators to whom we pay plenty of attention today, but who have been flying under the radar for decades. I’d much rather read about the passing of a gifted educator, or a committed neighborhood leader, or a beloved nun, than yet another starched-shirt banker or lawyer. These unsung heroes and grassroots innovators don’t live forever — even if their ideas and impact do.

A related question is, What really matters? As a society and business culture, we still tend to equate money with success. If someone is rich, the thinking goes, he or she may or may not be a no-good SOB, but a fortune is evidence that someone is smart, or at least shrewd, and no doubt a success. Which helps to explain why so many wealthy males get New York Times obituaries, while women who died with smaller bank accounts, but who may have led richer lives, don’t get the attention they deserve.


Image representing New York Times as depicted ...
Image via CrunchBase

Bill Taylor

As a public speaker, I’m always looking for ways to engage my audience. One old trick — which I never use, precisely because it is so old — is to challenge executives and entrepreneurs to imagine their obituary in the New York Times. What impact did you have? What contribution did you make? What kind of life did you lead?

As it turns out, this audience-participation exercise requires a special act of imagination for women. Consider this amazing statistic, brought to you by a Web site called The NYTpicker, which pokes, prods, and otherwise critiques the world’s greatest newspaper. For the month of August, the New York Times ran 78 obituaries, but only six were of women. For 2010 as a whole, the Times has published 698 obituaries — and only 92 were of women.

What’s going on here? The question is especially vexing since the percentage of women in the paper’s 2010 obituaries is virtually identical to the percentage of women chronicled in Times obituaries back in 1990. “Are the world’s prominent women — the ones deserving of NYT obituaries — simply living forever?” the NYTpicker wonders. “In the last two decades, has there been zero growth in the number of notable women who’ve died? Does it stand to reason that no more women have worked their way into the limelight in the last twenty years than in the previous twenty?”

It’s always fun to challenge a powerful institution like the New York Times — especially when it is (ahem) dead wrong. Leer más “The New York Times Is Dead Wrong”