Building your brand (and keeping your job)

By Josh Hyatt, contributor

FORTUNE — Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.”

Is somebody’s thinking due for a tune-up? Ford Motor Co. (F, Fortune 500) is, after all, the 107-year-old industrial brainchild of the iconic Henry Ford, birthplace of the Model T, originator of the modern assembly line. Scott Monty? He’s a 40-year-old father of two who coined the word used to describe a gathering organized on Twitter: tweetup. (Okay, so it’s hardly in the OMG category. But it beats “staycation.”)

As a former employee at a B-to-B ad agency and at a social-media strategy firm, Monty spent about three years making a name for himself in social networking by blogging about the convergence of marketing, advertising, and PR. When people at Ford approached him in December 2007 he waved them off, saying he didn’t want to leave Boston. Five months later he made a U-turn. By July, he had moved to Detroit. “I knew that I had the ability to leverage my personal brand on behalf of the company,” he says.

When Monty joined Ford, he brought with him 3,500 Twitter followers; he now counts 41,000, conceding that many of those came with the blue oval logo that now accompanies his tweets. But it has been a two-way street. Last year Ford CEO Alan Mulally signaled as much by joining Monty and taking questions from Twitter. “I brought with me a degree of credibility,” Monty says. “I was somebody who wasn’t going to be looked at as a corporate shill.” And he’s kept his Twitter handle as @scottmonty rather than adding the Ford brand. “I was Scott Monty before I came to Ford, and I’ll be Scott Monty after I leave Ford,” he says.


http://money.cnn.com/2010/07/30/news/economy/building_your_brand.fortune/index.htm

By Josh Hyatt, contributor

FORTUNE — Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.”

Is somebody’s thinking due for a tune-up? Ford Motor Co. (F, Fortune 500) is, after all, the 107-year-old industrial brainchild of the iconic Henry Ford, birthplace of the Model T, originator of the modern assembly line. Scott Monty? He’s a 40-year-old father of two who coined the word used to describe a gathering organized on Twitter: tweetup. (Okay, so it’s hardly in the OMG category. But it beats “staycation.”)

As a former employee at a B-to-B ad agency and at a social-media strategy firm, Monty spent about three years making a name for himself in social networking by blogging about the convergence of marketing, advertising, and PR. When people at Ford approached him in December 2007 he waved them off, saying he didn’t want to leave Boston. Five months later he made a U-turn. By July, he had moved to Detroit. “I knew that I had the ability to leverage my personal brand on behalf of the company,” he says.

When Monty joined Ford, he brought with him 3,500 Twitter followers; he now counts 41,000, conceding that many of those came with the blue oval logo that now accompanies his tweets. But it has been a two-way street. Last year Ford CEO Alan Mulally signaled as much by joining Monty and taking questions from Twitter. “I brought with me a degree of credibility,” Monty says. “I was somebody who wasn’t going to be looked at as a corporate shill.” And he’s kept his Twitter handle as @scottmonty rather than adding the Ford brand. “I was Scott Monty before I came to Ford, and I’ll be Scott Monty after I leave Ford,” he says. Leer más “Building your brand (and keeping your job)”

Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego

Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.”

I reckon the first paragraph about Scott Monty soured the audience to Josh Hyatt the writer. Here’s is the first paragraph.

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.””

Let’s dissect this paragraph step by step:

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer.”

This could mean that Scott cares so much for his ego, that he thinks he is more important than Ford.


My Photo

http://pr.typepad.com/pr_communications/2010/08/personal-branding-principles-not-ego.html

Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.”

I reckon the first paragraph about Scott Monty soured the audience to Josh Hyatt the writer. Here’s is the first paragraph.

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer. “I’m not somebody who can be accused of using Ford’s brand to benefit my own,” says Monty, the car giant’s first global digital and multimedia communications manager. “If anything, the opposite is true.””

Let’s dissect this paragraph step by step:

“Scott Monty’s personal brand doesn’t take a back seat to anyone else’s — not even that of Ford Motor Co., his employer.”

This could mean that Scott cares so much for his ego, that he thinks he is more important than Ford. Leer más “Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego”

Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego

Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.”


Josh Hyatt wrote an article about personal branding and working at a large company on money.cnn.com. The piece has caused a lot of controversy because Scott Monty, the social media guy at Ford, was featured in the article. To some, the article appears to paint Scott Monty as an egotist, and because they have so much respect for Scott many people have criticized Josh’s article.

In fact in reading through 5 pages of comments on the article, not one, except a piece of link bait is positive about the article or the writer, rather, overwhelmingly people are positive about Scott.

I must admit when I first read the article I had to read it twice to understand the nuance of what Josh was getting at. I was also slightly put off by a picture of a name badge stating, “Hello my name is Mr. Awesome.” Leer más “Personal Branding = Principles Not Ego”