Top 10 Ways to Embed Video into a Web Page

Since digital camcorders and video editing software became accessible to the large audience, it’s no longer a challenge for anybody to make a video. This fact underlies a lot of web trends, namely the sky-rocketing popularity of video sharing portals and widespread use of video content across websites and blogs.

A good piece of video can help you deliver your message more effectively, educate readers, stimulate discussion and get your brand going far beyond your own domain.

Happily, it’s not a problem nowadays to integrate a video into a web page, as there’s a lot of different tools to assist with this task. Some of them are free, others are pricey. Here is a roundup of the most popular means of web video embedment.


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Since digital camcorders and video editing software became accessible to the large audience, it’s no longer a challenge for anybody to make a video. This fact underlies a lot of web trends, namely the sky-rocketing popularity of video sharing portals and widespread use of video content across websites and blogs.

A good piece of video can help you deliver your message more effectively, educate readers, stimulate discussion and get your brand going far beyond your own domain.

Happily, it’s not a problem nowadays to integrate a video into a web page, as there’s a lot of different tools to assist with this task. Some of them are free, others are pricey. Here is a roundup of the most popular means of web video embedment.

Embed Video into a Web Page

10 Ways to Embed Video into a Web Page… Leer más “Top 10 Ways to Embed Video into a Web Page”

Flash vs. HTML5: Adobe Weighs In

Much has been written about the next wave of web technologies, namely HTML5, JavaScript and CSS3. A big part of this conversation has surrounded the impact that these new technologies will have on older technologies like Adobe’s Flash.

We’ve written a lot abut the HTML5 vs. Flash “war,” primarily in the context of Flash’s use in mobile and Flash as a video wrapper. I personally have taken the position that at least when it comes to mobile devices, Flash is at a disadvantage in terms of its abilities and capabilities when compared to newer technologies that can better harness hardware and software optimizations.

Adobe, understandably, has a different position. It believes that Flash and HTML5 can exist side-by-side and that each has its own set of strengths and weaknesses. I had a chance to talk to Paul Gubbay, Adobe’s VP of design and web engineering, about HTML5, Flash, the emerging mobile landscape and how Adobe fits into this new world.

The world of technology moves really, really quickly. To give you an idea of just how fast things can move, when I started working on this piece last month, Apple was still anti-Flash as an IDE for iOS development and Adobe’s set of HTML5 authoring tools was limited to Dreamweaver.

In the last week and a half, Apple has updated its developer guidelines and Adobe has issued an HTML5 add-on pack for Illustrator CS5.

I point out these recent changes because it indicates just how fast this industry is moving and that speed, inevitably, can impact the choices that designers, developers and end-users end up making.


Christina Warren//mashable.com

Flash HTML5 ImageMuch has been written about the next wave of web technologies, namely HTML5, JavaScript and CSS3. A big part of this conversation has surrounded the impact that these new technologies will have on older technologies like Adobe’s Flash.

We’ve written a lot abut the HTML5 vs. Flash “war,” primarily in the context of Flash’s use in mobile and Flash as a video wrapper. I personally have taken the position that at least when it comes to mobile devices, Flash is at a disadvantage in terms of its abilities and capabilities when compared to newer technologies that can better harness hardware and software optimizations.

Adobe, understandably, has a different position. It believes that Flash and HTML5 can exist side-by-side and that each has its own set of strengths and weaknesses. I had a chance to talk to Paul Gubbay, Adobe’s VP of design and web engineering, about HTML5, Flash, the emerging mobile landscape and how Adobe fits into this new world.

The world of technology moves really, really quickly. To give you an idea of just how fast things can move, when I started working on this piece last month, Apple was still anti-Flash as an IDE for iOS development and Adobe’s set of HTML5 authoring tools was limited to Dreamweaver.

In the last week and a half, Apple has updated its developer guidelines and Adobe has issued an HTML5 add-on pack for Illustrator CS5.

I point out these recent changes because it indicates just how fast this industry is moving and that speed, inevitably, can impact the choices that designers, developers and end-users end up making. Leer más “Flash vs. HTML5: Adobe Weighs In”

The Video Encoding Guide: Codecs, Formats, Containers And Settings Explained

Video encoding is the science of codifying the bits of data that make up a digital video recording into a unified whole according to a set of specific standards and parameters. If it sounds techy, it should. In simpler words, video encoding is the process of taking your original movie, as recorded by your camcorder, mobile phone or webcam, and preparing it for delivery in a digital format according to specific technical standards. This MasterNewMedia guide brings you everything you need to know about the key differences between major video file formats / containers and codecs.
video_encoding_codecs_formats_containers_settings_by_canon.jpg
Photo credit: Canon

From .WMV to .MOV and from .AVI to .FLV, this guide presents the best information available online on what you need to know about the use and characteristics of the major video file formats, containers and relative codecs.

When you video encode a clip, you are saving your video into a specific “format” much like you can do with a Word document or a digital image. A Word document can be encoded in .RTF or in .TXT, just like an image can be encoded in .JPG or .BMP formats.

Obviously, different types of encodings are good for different applications and devices.

Broadcasting, live streaming, burning to DVD and archiving all require different video encoding parameters while your computer browser, an iPhone and your gaming console have all different expectations when it comes to playing back video files. And this is why knowing a bit about video encoding, video file formats and containers is quite important if you intend to publish and distribute digital video.
In the video universe it is easy to get lost, as the formats, codecs and file containers generate a universe of possibilities and variables that are initially not easy to understand.

If you want to upload and publish a video on YouTube, for instance, you would have to choose specific encoding settings and file formats, whereas your choice would be different if your video clips are to burned on a DVD.

As an online publisher you may already be familiar with some of these issues, but as new technologies like HTML5 and WebM are starting to make inroads, you are going to need to better understand the key differences and the pros and cons that such different formats entail for you.

To help you achieve this goal, the MasterNewMedia research team has prepared a comprehensive guide to bring together all of the “fundamentals” you need to master to fully understand the basics of video encoding, specifically:

* What is video encoding
* Video file formats and containers
* Comparison of video codecs
* Encoding settings for Internet video publishing
* Video publishing settings for YouTube

Here is the MasterNewMedia Video Encoding Guide in detail:


Video encoding is the science of codifying the bits of data that make up a digital video recording into a unified whole according to a set of specific standards and parameters. If it sounds techy, it should. In simpler words, video encoding is the process of taking your original movie, as recorded by your camcorder, mobile phone or webcam, and preparing it for delivery in a digital format according to specific technical standards. This MasterNewMedia guide brings you everything you need to know about the key differences between major video file formats / containers and codecs.
video_encoding_codecs_formats_containers_settings_by_canon.jpg
Photo credit: Canon

From .WMV to .MOV and from .AVI to .FLV, this guide presents the best information available online on what you need to know about the use and characteristics of the major video file formats, containers and relative codecs.

When you video encode a clip, you are saving your video into a specific “format” much like you can do with a Word document or a digital image. A Word document can be encoded in .RTF or in .TXT, just like an image can be encoded in .JPG or .BMP formats.

Obviously, different types of encodings are good for different applications and devices.

Broadcasting, live streaming, burning to DVD and archiving all require different video encoding parameters while your computer browser, an iPhone and your gaming console have all different expectations when it comes to playing back video files. And this is why knowing a bit about video encoding, video file formats and containers is quite important if you intend to publish and distribute digital video.
In the video universe it is easy to get lost, as the formats, codecs and file containers generate a universe of possibilities and variables that are initially not easy to understand.

If you want to upload and publish a video on YouTube, for instance, you would have to choose specific encoding settings and file formats, whereas your choice would be different if your video clips are to burned on a DVD.

As an online publisher you may already be familiar with some of these issues, but as new technologies like  HTML5 and  WebM are starting to make inroads, you are going to need to better understand the key differences and the pros and cons that such different formats entail for you.

To help you achieve this goal, the MasterNewMedia research team has prepared a comprehensive guide to bring together all of the “fundamentals” you need to master to fully understand the basics of video encoding, specifically:

  • What is video encoding
  • Video file formats and containers
  • Comparison of video codecs
  • Encoding settings for Internet video publishing
  • Video publishing settings for YouTube

Here is the MasterNewMedia Video Encoding Guide in detail: Leer más “The Video Encoding Guide: Codecs, Formats, Containers And Settings Explained”