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How to Be a Successful Entrepreneur with the Right Mindset

Throughout my career I have met many different entrepreneurs starting out who have great ideas and visions for their company. They have all the right ingredients that make a successful entrepreneur: They know who their target market is, their problems and the solutions they seek, they know how to reach them and they have a sure-win marketing strategy to get them going.
However, some of these entrepreneurs don’t have the right mindset when starting out and this has a direct affect on their success. So how do you ensure you have a mindset geared for success?

It is said that 80% of the reasons holding us back from being successful are inside us and only 20% are on the outside – wow. . . I find this so interesting. How often do we take time to reflect on what is going on inside our minds and how this is affecting our outside world?
10 Habits of a Successful Entrepreneur…


 

Kirstin ODonovan | http://workawesome.com
Successful Entrepreneur

Throughout my career I have met many different entrepreneurs starting out who have great ideas and visions for their company. They have all the right ingredients that make a successful entrepreneur: They know who their target market is, their problems and the solutions they seek, they know how to reach them and they have a sure-win marketing strategy to get them going.

However, some of these entrepreneurs don’t have the right mindset when starting out and this has a direct affect on their success.  So how do you ensure you have a mindset geared for success?

It is said that 80% of the reasons holding us back from being successful are inside us and only 20% are on the outside – wow. . . I find this so interesting. How often do we take time to reflect on what is going on inside our minds and how this is affecting our outside world?

10 Habits of a Successful EntrepreneurLeer más “How to Be a Successful Entrepreneur with the Right Mindset”

7 Best Ways To Gain Confidence in 2011

Confidence is a characteristic that allows us to take risks in our lives. It is often through risk, we achieve great success in many aspects of our lives. It makes sense, therefore, to try to develop our own self-confidence as best we can in order to be successful and happy. Here are 7 best ways to do just that:

Create a Life Philosophy

The basis of your self-confidence will come from your having developed and followed a life philosophy. This life philosophy can grow out of a great thinker whom you admire, a convergence of ideas you’ve picked up in your education, or something unique to yourself that you’ve developed. The point is that you should have a philosophy that will guide your every action. If you have a solid philosophy on life, and it’s one that you’ve developed smartly, then you’ll always know how to act and think. That’s something you can be confident in.


Written by Barbara Jolie
http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/7-best-ways-to-gain-confidence/

Confidence is a characteristic that allows us to take risks in our lives. It is often through risk, we achieve great success in many aspects of our lives. It makes sense, therefore, to try to develop our own self-confidence as best we can in order to be successful and happy. Here are 7 best ways to do just that:

Create a Life Philosophy

The basis of your self-confidence will come from your having developed and followed a life philosophy.  This life philosophy can grow out of a great thinker whom you admire, a convergence of ideas you’ve picked up in your education, or something unique to yourself that you’ve developed. The point is that you should have a philosophy that will guide your every action. If you have a solid philosophy on life, and it’s one that you’ve developed smartly, then you’ll always know how to act and think. That’s something you can be confident in. Leer más “7 Best Ways To Gain Confidence in 2011”

Promote Failure, Fail Forward | by Stefan Lindegaard

Promote failure. Entrepreneurs understand that each small failure brings them closer to the solution. So find ways to demand lots of baby-step failures that promote learning and create a culture of action. This will get you to the finish line and keep fear of failure from locking up your innovation engine.

Fail forward. Get into the habit of creating many experiments and celebrating the learning. For example: “In this experiment we learned that people did not understand our offer.” “In this experiment we learned we were charging too much.” And “in this experiment we learned that the button had to be in a different place.”

Each “failure” is actually a success, because the team has learned something important and has moved one more step closer toward getting it right.

These are the only snippets directly related to smartfailing, but the article is still worth checking out if you are interested in innovation: The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare


http://www.smartfailing.com/2010/10/01/promote-failure-fail-forward/
I really liked the inspiration of promoting failure and failing forward as introduced by G. Michael Maddock and Raphael Louis Viton in their article, The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare.

The snippets:

Promote failure. Entrepreneurs understand that each small failure brings them closer to the solution. So find ways to demand lots of baby-step failures that promote learning and create a culture of action. This will get you to the finish line and keep fear of failure from locking up your innovation engine.

Fail forward. Get into the habit of creating many experiments and celebrating the learning. For example: “In this experiment we learned that people did not understand our offer.” “In this experiment we learned we were charging too much.” And “in this experiment we learned that the button had to be in a different place.”

Each “failure” is actually a success, because the team has learned something important and has moved one more step closer toward getting it right.

These are the only snippets directly related to smartfailing, but the article is still worth checking out if you are interested in innovation: The CEO’s Innovation Nightmare

Return on Failure: The Equation

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not). The key is ‘undesired’ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great! But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn. Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure? We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own. There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

1. Identification of the Failure(s)
2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping. That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP…





http://www.mills-scofield.com

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not).  The key is ‘undesired‘ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great!  But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn.  Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure?  We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own.  There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

  1. Identification of the Failure(s)
  2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
  3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping.  That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP… Leer más “Return on Failure: The Equation”

5 Essential Lessons on Success

By Mr. Self Development
http://thinksimplenow.com

Today I want to talk about the ingredients that cause success. Why do some people succeed, while others fail? what separates the two. I’m constantly intrigued with the concepts involved in success and failure. I’ve dedicated my life to discovering and explaining what separates one from the other.

I spend my days learning about the laws and the principles of success. I believe if we learn these laws and principles we will succeed. In fact, if anyone learns these laws and principles, they will succeed.

The laws of success will move your life from the pit to the palace, from ordinary to extraordinary. With that, let’s take a look at five essential lessons on the causes of success.

5 Must Read Lessons on What Causes Success:
1. Understanding the Success Formula

“Success is simply a matter of luck. Ask any failure.”
–Earl Wilson

Success is usually the result of concentrated focus in an area where you have a natural advantage. Concentrated focus multiplies your effectiveness seven-fold. Concentrated focus makes the difference.

One man with discipline, determination, and focus will accomplish more than a 100 men who are merely interested.

The use of concentrated focus in an area where you are talented, will in time, grant you the opportunity to succeed. Success has almost nothing to do with luck. What people call luck is usually the offspring of concentrated focus. Success may appear to be the result of luck, but appearances are often deceiving.
2. Passionate Energy and Drive


lessons on success
Photo by Aeschleah DeMartino

By Mr. Self Development
http://thinksimplenow.com

Today I want to talk about the ingredients that cause success. Why do some people succeed, while others fail? what separates the two. I’m constantly intrigued with the concepts involved in success and failure. I’ve dedicated my life to discovering and explaining what separates one from the other.

I spend my days learning about the laws and the principles of success. I believe if we learn these laws and principles we will succeed. In fact, if anyone learns these laws and principles, they will succeed.

The laws of success will move your life from the pit to the palace, from ordinary to extraordinary. With that, let’s take a look at five essential lessons on the causes of success.

5 Must Read Lessons on What Causes Success: Leer más “5 Essential Lessons on Success”

Column: Redefining Failure

by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected.


by Seth Godin

We think we know what failure looks like. Products don’t get purchased. Reorganizations make things worse. Shipments aren’t delivered. Speeches don’t get applauded. Things explode. These are the emergencies and disasters that we have nightmares about.

We think that failure is the opposite of success, and we optimize our organizations to avoid it. We install layers and layers of management to eliminate risk and prevent catastrophes. One surefire way we’ve found to avoid failing is to narrowly define what failure is—in other words, to treat almost everything that happens as a nonfailure. If the outcome of our efforts isn’t a failure, there’s no need to panic, is there? Failure creates urgency. Failure gets you fired. Failure cannot stand; it demands a response. But the status quo is simply embraced and, incredibly, protected. Leer más “Column: Redefining Failure”