Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company

Types of Facebook Deals:

Individual Facebook Deal – To claim this type of deal, users need to only check into a venue once. When the user checks in, they click “Claim Deal,” which changes their phone screen to say, “Show phone screen at register to redeem.” Any venue offering these giveaways should be sure that the staff is well-versed on how to fulfill the deal.

The individual deal is best for venues looking to attract new visitors. Each time a person redeems a deal, it’s posted to his/her Facebook wall, making your venue front and center for his/her 100-1,000 friends.

What to be aware of: Deals are new for most users, so messaging and staff training are a necessity. Also, a major challenge for new users of Facebook check-ins is that instead of waiting for their phone to auto-populate with nearby locations, they have the option to create their own venue if they can’t find yours. If they make their own, they’ll never see your official location or your deal.

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At the dismay of my friends that are not engulfed in social media, I’ve been doing quite a bit of research into LBS programs and what works and doesn’t work with each one. For the past month, I’ve been looking into Facebook Places, more specifically its new Deals program.

If you’re not up to speed, Facebook enables companies to claim their venue so when smart phone users check-in, the location is tied back to the official Facebook page (see The San Diego Museum of Art for example).

Once a company has claimed its venue, the admin of the official page can create a Facebook Deal. The challenge of marketers is to decide “which type of deal is right for my brand?” I’ve come to find there are some loopholes in some of the deals that marketers should be aware of before deciding. Leer más “Which Facebook Deal is Best for your Company”

Facebook in the real world – amazing case study

Each of the people with the bracelets were invited to swipe their bands at certain places to give a ‘Like’ to that particular product or activity. And they were also able to upload their own pictures to their Facebook profiles, where they were automatically tagged. Over 650 teenagers used the RFID bracelets over 3 days and over 35,000 ‘Likes’ were made. Pretty impressive, especially when you consider how many friends those people would have reached through their individual newsfeeds.


 

coca cola 200x200 Facebook in the real world   amazing case studyIt’s a rare moment when I see something being done online and instantly want to try it out for one of our clients. This however, is a great example of integrating Facebook with your offline marketing activity in a completely new way that I would love to try! It comes from Coca Cola in India Israel. At their amusement park in India Israel, an annual event called Coca Cola Village,  they issued customers with an RFID (radio frequency identification) bracelet that contained their Facebook details. Check out what they did with it in the video below :

 

Each of the people with the bracelets were invited to swipe their bands at certain places to give a ‘Like’ to that particular product or activity. And they were also able to upload their own pictures to their Facebook profiles, where they were automatically tagged. Over 650 teenagers used the RFID bracelets over 3 days and over 35,000 ‘Likes’ were made. Pretty impressive, especially when you consider how many friends those people would have reached through their individual newsfeeds.

This is the kind of thing that really gets me excited. Seeing social technology being used in a completely new way, but importantly integrating with ‘real world’ activity. There’s nothing better for a brand than having hundreds of people running around actually ‘Liking’ all your content and sharing it with your friends. And because it’s something completely new for the user, they go around swiping everything in sight! Leer más “Facebook in the real world – amazing case study”

Use of Geosocial Services is Underwhelming — for Now

Based on a Pew Internet survey released this morning, only 4 percent of American adults who go online on a regular basis are using any form of geosocial or location-based services like Foursquare. And on any given day, only 1 percent of internet users are taking advantage of these services. To complete the survey, Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, based in Washington, D.C., contacted 3,001 ages 18 and older between Aug. 9 and Sept. 13, 2010.

Not surprisingly, the report shows that those who are in the habit of sharing their immediate location with their friends — or “checking in” with acquaintances who might be in the immediate neighborhood — are more likely to be young and mobile adults between the ages of 18 and 29. These geosocial gadflies who go online with their mobile phones use a location-based service like Foursquare or Gowalla, according to the study.

But perhaps we should take a second to describe the geosocial service to those who might be unfamiliar with the concept. Location-based services, which run on standalone software applications, or “apps,” permit users of smartphones and other mobile devices to notify friends when the user is nearby


Based on a Pew Internet survey released this morning, only 4 percent of American adults who go online on a regular basis are using any form of geosocial or location-based services like Foursquare. And on any given day, only 1 percent of internet users are taking advantage of these services. To complete the survey, Pew Research Center‘s Internet & American Life Project, based in Washington, D.C., contacted 3,001 ages 18 and older between Aug. 9 and Sept. 13, 2010.

Not surprisingly, the report shows that those who are in the habit of sharing their immediate location with their friends — or “checking in” with acquaintances who might be in the immediate neighborhood — are more likely to be young and mobile adults between the ages of 18 and 29. These geosocial gadflies who go online with their mobile phones use a location-based service like Foursquare or Gowalla, according to the study.

But perhaps we should take a second to describe the geosocial service to those who might be unfamiliar with the concept. Location-based services, which run on standalone software applications, or “apps,” permit users of smartphones and other mobile devices to notify friends when the user is nearby Leer más “Use of Geosocial Services is Underwhelming — for Now”

5 Important New Trends in Location

Advancements in mobile phone location technology not only allow for automatic background location behaviors, but also facilitate real-time, private location sharing for more practical purposes of a personal variety.

Geofencing technology powers most of these features — a geofence is nothing more than a virtual perimeter for a geographic area. Simply put, newer location-based applications enable users to build virtual fences around areas of interest. Those fences can be static or dynamic in nature, and possess properties that trigger behaviors such as notifications and automatic location updates upon zone entry or exit.

In Neer, geofencing is used behind-the-scenes to update a user’s whereabouts and trigger follow-up behaviors. When a Neer user enters or leaves a pre-defined, geofenced region, the application will update accordingly. Friends and family will receive automatic notifications, should the user so specify.

Geoloqi offers another approach to private location-sharing. The full-featured mobile and web platform also taps into to geofencing technology so users can leave themselves geo-located notes and perform time-saving automatic location-specific activities — think sending and receiving SMS messages when you enter or leave designated areas.

These private location-sharing activities could come in handy if you want to automatically notify a friend that you’re on your way to their house, or auto-email your boss that you’re running late. The service is currently limited to beta testers, but it certainly highlights the practical potential of background location for personal and peer-to-peer use.


Jennifer Van Grove | //mashable.com

As Facebook enters into the location market with Facebook Places, the world’s largest social network will help to make the edgy concept of checkins and location-sharing a mainstream practice.

Facebook (Facebook) is just one company attempting to add location for context; there are countless others going above and beyond checkins to push the space forward. There’s also a noticeable uptick in consumer interest around applications and services that feature location for sharing or utility.

The geolocation space is the one to watch right now — celebrities are flocking to Foursquare (Foursquare), location is finding a unique purpose in many mobile apps, background location is becoming a commonplace feature on smartphones, geofencing is evolving in purpose and function, and location-based social networks are proving to be the perfect platforms for cause marketing. What follows is a more detailed look at these five huge trends in location and how they will influence consumer adoption and inspire developer creativity. Leer más “5 Important New Trends in Location”

Facebook is becoming real life

I’ve covered a few articles on the blog that show how Facebook is moving out of the confines of a typical social network and becoming more and more integrated with other parts of our lives. Delta Airlines turned it into a booking engine, Coca Cola took it into amusement marks with real-world Likes and we’re starting to see many other examples that show how the site is growing at an alarming pace and steadily diversifying. The latest addition comes from Target, who are introducing Facebook Credit gift cards into their stores.


Author of Facebook is becoming real lifeby Lauren Fisher

I’ve covered a few articles on the blog that show how Facebook is moving out of the confines of a typical social network and becoming more and more integrated with other parts of our lives. Delta Airlines turned it into a booking engine,  Coca Cola took it into amusement marks with real-world Likes and we’re starting to see many other examples that show how the site is growing at an alarming pace and steadily diversifying. The latest addition comes from Target, who are introducing Facebook Credit gift cards into their stores.

facebook gift cards Facebook is becoming real life

This is Facebook’s first foray into the retail world and it’s an important one. While the concept may not be all that new – we’ve had iTunes gift cards for a few years now – this has important implications for the way we consume our social content. While the iTunes card leads to one site and one purchase, the potential for Facebook gift cards is phenomenal.

The area of online purchases through games and social objects is ready to hit the mainstream and Facebook have just made this a little bit easier. By providing a physical purchase point they tap into common behaviour – purchasing a gift card – but use this for something completely new. I think it’s absolutely genius  and brings us one step closer to a unified shopping experience, where your real and virtual currency are no longer separated.

Leer más “Facebook is becoming real life”

Starbucks coloniza el marketing móvil y permite pagar con la Blackberry

Starbucks, una marca pionera en el uso de las redes sociales, la realidad aumentada y que se encuentra entre los primeros anunciantes en atreverse con los sistemas de pago en Twitter está probando un nuevo sistema de pago a través de la Blackberry en sus tiendas de Seattle y California.

Los sistemas de pago a través del móvil están muy masificados en Japón pero no han logrado integrarse en el resto del mundo y su implantación podría ser clave para el desarrollo del marketing móvil, ya que junto al pago se podrían incluir cupones de descuento y estrategias de fidelización.


Starbucks, una marca pionera en el uso de las redes sociales, la realidad aumentada y que se encuentra entre los primeros anunciantes en atreverse con los sistemas de pago en Twitter está probando un nuevo sistema de pago a través de la Blackberry en sus tiendas de Seattle y California.

Los sistemas de pago a través del móvil están muy masificados en Japón pero no han logrado integrarse en el resto del mundo y su implantación podría ser clave para el desarrollo del marketing móvil, ya que junto al pago se podrían incluir cupones de descuento y estrategias de fidelización. Leer más “Starbucks coloniza el marketing móvil y permite pagar con la Blackberry”