3 Big CMO-Worthy Benefits of Landing Pages – Thanks to @ioninteractive


(…) landing pages require more resources? More content? More effort? Aren’t they more to manage? Isn’t it more to integrate?

Vía ioninteractive.com

To be honest, yes, they do.

Creating campaign-specific landing pages requires work. But the impact that a successful landing page can have on metrics such as cost to acquire a customer and ROI is tremendous.

These are the statistics executives care about and the reason why the lowly landing page should be elevated to a seat worth time and attention from everyone inside your marketing organization, including your CMO.

+INFO? Full article here 🙂

There are 3 primary benefits to landing pages:

1. Better User Experiences

When it comes to post-click marketing, first impressions are crucial. You have 1/20th of a second to impress your visitor after they click, so it’s up to you to make it count.

2. Easy Experimentation

All digital marketers know the value of testing when it comes to web pages, however sometimes it’s hard to conceive and execute a test of a a big idea on the website.

3. Increased Leads, Sales & Revenue:

We now know that landing pages can have a huge impact on the overall visitor experience, and we know that they make testing a breeze.

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Products that help you survive office life

When you are hired by a large company or corporation, you are shown a video on office harassment. The video looks like a 1970s porn film without the sex. Bad acting and rhythmic guitar rifts, but the common thread throughout the video is that even when you are in the right, if someone complains about you, then you are guilty and wrong. With a small cast of characters in this video, it’s always the same person being offended by the actions of coworkers. One might wonder why the old rules of society aren’t followed and the constant complainer isn’t just buried up to his or her neck and hit in turn by every other employee with a polo mallet until dead. The modern office has a strange political hierarchy and it will not bend or break to your will or common sense. Learn to deal with it safely and with a sense of good-natured flair!


At one of my first jobs, my lunch constantly disappeared from the community refrigerator. There were no clues and, being New York, “nobody saw nuttin!”

I tried marking my lunch. I tried notes pleading with people to not take my lunch. I tried hiding my lunch behind cans, etc. Nothing worked. One day, after my lunch disappeared, I shut the refrigerator door and laughed maniacally. Someone asked me what was so funny.

“Today is the day I find out who has been stealing my lunch,” I replied. “I put rat poison on my sandwich! We’ll find the thief in about an hour when he or she starts dying.”

Sure enough, a coworker screamed and ran around like she was on fire. As she was about to be taken to the hospital to have her stomach pumped, I laughed and admitted it wasn’t really poisoned. Naturally, I was fired. It didn’t matter that this woman had stolen my lunch for her mid-morning snack every day. It seems my “joke” was considered “dangerous” and I was chastised for possibly “giving (her) a heart attack.”

In one office, coworkers had small refrigerators in their cubicles to keep their lunch and drinks cold and safe. The energy bills must have been too much for the company so a memo went around informing people that these appliances were against the fire code. The kitchen refrigerator then became a repository of science experiments as people forgot half sandwiches and slabs of meatloaf for weeks and months. Sometimes you couldn’t even tell what was in the Tupperware it was so furry and moldy.

Being a smoker, I often found that people would pop into my cubicle to borrow my lighter, which sat out with my pack of cigarettes. Switching to gag lighter that gave those who pushed the button to light it a severe shock, I was once again chastised for a dangerous item that could “give someone a heart attack!”

Again, it would be a telltale sign of who was stealing my lighters. Sometimes there’s just no justice in the world and certainly not an office.

When you are hired by a large company or corporation, you are shown a video on office harassment. The video looks like a 1970s porn film without the sex. Bad acting and rhythmic guitar rifts, but the common thread throughout the video is that even when you are in the right, if someone complains about you, then you are guilty and wrong. With a small cast of characters in this video, it’s always the same person being offended by the actions of coworkers. One might wonder why the old rules of society aren’t followed and the constant complainer isn’t just buried up to his or her neck and hit in turn by every other employee with a polo mallet until dead. The modern office has a strange political hierarchy and it will not bend or break to your will or common sense. Learn to deal with it safely and with a sense of good-natured flair!

Save your lunch

And do it without the expense of poison and explosive booby traps that blow off human fingers! Try these sickening lunch bags with horrid mold or cockroaches printed on them.

Leer más “Products that help you survive office life”

Return on Failure: The Equation

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not). The key is ‘undesired’ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great! But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn. Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure? We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own. There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

1. Identification of the Failure(s)
2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping. That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP…





http://www.mills-scofield.com

What is failure? When things don’t go according to plan or expectations, ending up with unexpected and/or undesired outcomes (which we can argue could have been avoidable, or not).  The key is ‘undesired‘ – because if they were desired and not planned or expected, that would still be great!  But, as we will see, failure is a terrific way to learn.  Maybe we could measure learning as Return on Failure: ROF.

We’ve all heard the phrase “fail often, fail cheap, fail fast.” So, can we do a better job of learning from failure?  We’re not built to do this easily, either by learning from others’ failures or our own.  There are many ways to learn from failure, so what I’m suggesting is just one way.

One way we could start learning from failure is through a simple 3-step process (bear in mind, simple ≠ easy!):

  1. Identification of the Failure(s)
  2. Analysis of the Failure(s)
  3. Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping based on the learnings from the failures

So, and check my ‘math’, ROF is the sum of Failure Identification + Failure Analysis applied over (and over…) Iterative Experimenting & Prototyping.  That’s the framework (for now).

ROF = (FI + FA)/IEP… Leer más “Return on Failure: The Equation”

Multivariate Testing: Can you radically improve marketing ROI by increasing variables you test?

In response, one emerging MVT service model offers getting to a “lift” faster by using adaptive elimination of likely underperformers, in exchange for the test results providing limited information beyond identifying the winner. Such test results are not as useful as their full-factorial brethren for designing subsequent tests because adaptive elimination of treatments makes it difficult to extrapolate the psychological factors and consumer preferences responsible for the test outcome. The immediate business benefits, however, are more immediate.


As I was reading a few LinkedIn discussions about multivariate testing (MVT), I began to wonder if 2010 was going to be the year of multivariate.

1,000,000 monkeys can’t be wrong

Multivariate Testing (MVT) is starting to earn a place in the pantheon of buzzwords like cloud computing, service-oriented architecture, and synergy. But is a test the same thing as an experiment? While I am not a statistician (nor did I stay at the Holiday Inn last night), working at MarketingExperiments with the analytical likes of Bob Kemper (MBA) and Arturo Silva Nava (MBA) has helped me understand the value of a disciplined approach to experimental design.

MonkeyWhat I see out there is that a little knowledge is indeed a dangerous thing. Good intentions behind powerful and relatively easy-to-use platforms like Omniture® Test&Target™ and Google® Website Optimizer™ have generated a misleading sense that as long as a multivariate test is large enough (several hundred or more combinations being tested), at least one of the combinations will outperform the control.

This notion has become the value proposition of a growing number of companies offering services around either the big-name or their own (simpler, and often therefore easier to set up) MVT tools. They are ostensibly betting on the technology, and not on a systematic approach to experimental design or any particular UI/UX (user interface/user experience) optimization theory.

Even though, as Bob has pointed out to me, it is reasonable that an MVT setup with a billion combinations may not yield a lift over the control, my contention is that the risk-weighted business cost of a dissatisfied customer is low. Therefore, little stops the burgeoning MVT shops from safely offering a “100% lift guarantee.” Just like the proverbial million monkeys with typewriters, somewhere among thousands of spray-and-pray treatments their MVT tests are expected to produce one that’s better than the rest.

1 monkey with a stick Leer más “Multivariate Testing: Can you radically improve marketing ROI by increasing variables you test?”