What do people really want from brands online?

The sometimes skewed approach that many brands have when they carry out activity in social media, is to think about what particular product or content they want to push onto consumers. It’s very tempting to become obsessed with how your brand appears that you try and push the boundaries of social media to the limit, until you end up with the most complicated campaign that uses all the latest technology. The only problem is that you’ve become so obsessed with how to portray your brand as a leader in social technologies that you’ve forgotten to ask what it is your customers actually want from you.

The first thing to remember is that people don’t actually want to be your friend. They’re not following you on Twitter or Facebook because they want to have a one on one conversation about the weather or your thoughts on who should have won X Factor. What people actually want from brands is a mixture of news, promotions and just generally to get a query sorted as quickly as possible. Indeed, a recent survey by emarketer found that while 25% of people wanted to follow a brand for promotions, just 4% wanted to feel part of that brand’s community. So as much as you can focus on building the coolest community around your brand with impressive apps and social tools, it’s the relatively unsexy things such as discounts and offers that customers actually want.


The sometimes skewed approach that many brands have when they carry out activity in social media, is to think about what particular product or content they want to push onto consumers. It’s very tempting to become obsessed with how your brand appears that you try and push the boundaries of social media to the limit, until you end up with the most complicated campaign that uses all the latest technology. The only problem is that you’ve become so obsessed with how to portray your brand as a leader in social technologies that you’ve forgotten to ask what it is your customers actually want from you.

The first thing to remember is that people don’t actually want to be your friend. They’re not following you on Twitter or Facebook because they want to have a one on one conversation about the weather or your thoughts on who should have won X Factor. What people actually want from brands is a mixture of news, promotions and just generally to get a query sorted as quickly as possible. Indeed, a recent survey by emarketer found that while 25% of people wanted to follow a brand for promotions, just 4% wanted to feel part of that brand’s community. So as much as you can focus on building the coolest community around your brand with impressive apps and social tools, it’s the relatively unsexy things such as discounts and offers that customers actually want. Leer más “What do people really want from brands online?”

Why Can’t Big Companies Solve Big Problems?

In fact, it’s that very question: “What is the question?” that seems to be the nub of the problem these days. In an increasingly turbulent and interconnected world, the ambiguity that surrounds us is rising to unprecedented levels. And that’s a serious problem that our current systems can’t handle. Fighting terrorism, fixing healthcare and restarting the economy aren’t just complex problems — they’re highly ambiguous ones.

It turns out that while large companies and organizations are phenomenally good at managing complexity, they’re actually quite bad at tackling ambiguity. A complicated problem is like playing a game of chess, an ambiguous problem is like having your in-laws over to dinner for the first time. In the latter situation, it’s not the number of variables that kills you. It’s what you don’t know that you don’t know.


By Edward Liu
http://www.fastcodesign.com/1662575/what-cant-big-companies-solve-big-problems

I completely agree. As a employee of a large conglomerate, I have fought hard to avoid becoming another cog in the system. The mentality is very conservative – that’s one part of the problem and it’s primarily due to the demographics of the company. At the same time, the great irony of being a large company and unable to fight large problems comes from the very political nature of a large company. Multiple “leaders” within the organization have their own agenda/goals. And when they all want different things, of course, it does not translate exactly into progress.

Utlimately, it’s true that it is the major leaders such as the CEO or Board of Directors which must make the right stand and not only encourage but ensure that hybrid thinking & solutions is implemented. However, going back to the demographics, it seems that unfortunately the inherent difficulties could mean that this may not happen for at least another generation. Let’s hope it is sooner than later. Leer más “Why Can’t Big Companies Solve Big Problems?”

15 Things Every PC User Should Know

Whether you’re a grizzled tech veteran or an uninitiated newb, here are 15 essential facts and tricks that you ought to know.

Patrick Miller

Think you know tech? If you don’t have a handle on every single one of these 15 tech facts, habits, and efficiency tricks, you’re not living up to your potential.

1. Don’t double-click everything. Windows 101: Double-clicking is how you open items in Windows. It’s not how you open links in your Web browser, click buttons in dialog boxes, or do pretty much anything else–and if you reflexively double-click, you might accidentally zip right past something important or submit a form twice. If you don’t need this reminder yourself, chances are you know someone who does.

2. Use slashes and backslashes in the appropriate situations. Let’s get it straight: / is a slash (or forward slash, if you must), and \ is a backslash. Backslashes are conventionally used for Windows file paths (C:\Program Files\Whatever), while slashes are used for Internet addresses (http://www.pcworld.com/howto.html).

3. Record the exact error message. When your PC crashes, it’ll usually try to tell you why it is doing so–albeit with a string of numbers and letters that you won’t understand. Write the message down in its entirety (or take a screenshot, if possible) so you can later plug it into Google or give it to your tech support agent. If your PC didn’t provide an error message, go to Action Center (in the Control Panel) and see if it shows up under ‘View archived messages’ or ‘View problems to report’.


Disk Cleanup; click for full-size image.Whether you’re a grizzled tech veteran or an uninitiated newb, here are 15 essential facts and tricks that you ought to know.

Patrick Miller

Think you know tech? If you don’t have a handle on every single one of these 15 tech facts, habits, and efficiency tricks, you’re not living up to your potential.

1. Don’t double-click everything. Windows 101: Double-clicking is how you open items in Windows. It’s not how you open links in your Web browser, click buttons in dialog boxes, or do pretty much anything else–and if you reflexively double-click, you might accidentally zip right past something important or submit a form twice. If you don’t need this reminder yourself, chances are you know someone who does.

2. Use slashes and backslashes in the appropriate situations. Let’s get it straight: / is a slash (or forward slash, if you must), and \ is a backslash. Backslashes are conventionally used for Windows file paths (C:\Program Files\Whatever), while slashes are used for Internet addresses (http://www.pcworld.com/howto.html).

3. Record the exact error message. When your PC crashes, it’ll usually try to tell you why it is doing so–albeit with a string of numbers and letters that you won’t understand. Write the message down in its entirety (or take a screenshot, if possible) so you can later plug it into Google or give it to your tech support agent. If your PC didn’t provide an error message, go to Action Center (in the Control Panel) and see if it shows up under ‘View archived messages’ or ‘View problems to report’. Leer más “15 Things Every PC User Should Know”