Google prueba con éxito autos robot


Desarrolladores del buscador lanzaron autos con cámaras y detectores de radar que no sólo conducen más seguro sino más rápido. Desde Google creen que así podrían circular el doble de autos que si conducen humanos

I Wish We Had Google Understand Not Google Instant Search

Earlier this week Google launched the latest iteration of the SERP’s, Google Instant. While I, like everyone else, had fun playing and finding some of the holes in it, it’s really not a product that I think will succeed. To Google’s credit, I can’t ever say that I’ve heard people complain that Google takes too long to serve them results. What I do hear and personally experience is that I wish Google understood what I was looking for …
Google didn’t learn that all this complexity isn’t what people want from the failed Google wave and Sidewiki experiments …

I understand why Google launched a product like Google instant search: they feel that, because they are smart enough at predicting what you are looking for, they can interpret your query after a word or two–or sometimes after just a few letters. They think they know you so well that they can guess what you want without being told. Without getting too involved in what’s going on behind the scenes, Google is using previous search volume to predict the most likely term(s) you are looking for. It’s a sophisticated leap forward in technology to be sure, but it’s not something that solves a problem I hear people complain about. (As a side, this does give a lot more context to the bizarre statement Eric Schmidt made a few weeks ago: “They want Google to tell them what they should be doing next.”)


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Michael Gray

By Michael Gray | //wolf-howl.com

Earlier this week Google launched the latest iteration of the SERP’s, Google Instant. While I, like everyone else, had fun playing and finding some of the holes in it, it’s really not a product that I think will succeed. To Google’s credit, I can’t ever say that I’ve heard people complain that Google takes too long to serve them results. What I do hear and personally experience is that I wish Google understood what I was looking for …

Google didn’t learn that all this complexity isn’t what people want from the failed Google wave and Sidewiki experiments …

I understand why Google launched a product like Google instant search: they feel that, because they are smart enough at predicting what you are looking for, they can interpret your query after a word or two–or sometimes after just a few letters. They think they know you so well that they can guess what you want without being told. Without getting too involved in what’s going on behind the scenes, Google is using previous search volume to predict the most likely term(s) you are looking for. It’s a sophisticated leap forward in technology to be sure, but it’s not something that solves a problem I hear people complain about. (As a side, this does give a lot more context to the bizarre statement Eric Schmidt made a few weeks ago: “They want Google to tell them what they should be doing next.”) Leer más “I Wish We Had Google Understand Not Google Instant Search”

Eric Schmidt (Google): “La publicidad móvil display será la próxima gran revolución”

En la entrevista, Schmidt se refiere a la seria amenaza que su compañía representa para el sector editorial, una amenaza que no se produce además entre iguales, puesto que las editoriales de periódicos y revistas tienen asumido que juegan en una liga inferior a la de la todopoderosa empresa de internet. En realidad, los directos competidores de Google, reconoce Schmidt en Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, son Facebook y Apple. Con ambas empresas, Google admite mantener ciertas disputas. Sin embargo, “yo no lo llamaría un guerra, sino una batalla estratégica”, aclara Schmidt. El consejero delegado del gigante de internet está convencido de que el sistema abierto de Google supera tanto a Facebook como a Apple. “El aperturismo es mi religión. La religión de Apple es todo lo contrario. Lo sé porque me he sentado en su consejo de administración”, sentencia el CEO de Google.


Apple es una “religión”, la publicidad móvil display será el killer las aplicaciones y Google está dispuesto a ayudar a las editoriales con un sistema de pago. Con estas jugosas declaraciones se despacha Eric Schmidt, CEO del gigante de internet Google, en una entrevista para Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

En la entrevista, Schmidt se refiere a la seria amenaza que su compañía representa para el sector editorial, una amenaza que no se produce además entre iguales, puesto que las editoriales de periódicos y revistas tienen asumido que juegan en una liga inferior a la de la todopoderosa empresa de internet. En realidad, los directos competidores de Google, reconoce Schmidt en Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, son Facebook y Apple. Con ambas empresas, Google admite mantener ciertas disputas. Sin embargo, “yo no lo llamaría un guerra, sino una batalla estratégica”, aclara Schmidt. El consejero delegado del gigante de internet está convencido de que el sistema abierto de Google supera tanto a Facebook como a Apple. “El aperturismo es mi religión. La religión de Apple es todo lo contrario. Lo sé porque me he sentado en su consejo de administración”, sentencia el CEO de Google. Leer más “Eric Schmidt (Google): “La publicidad móvil display será la próxima gran revolución””

Google CEO: The Next Great Stage of Search is Automatic

That sounds pretty interesting, as long as you can turn it off and exercise some control over what’s being sent. “What’s that ping notification you just received,” your mother in law might ask as you travel through town together. “Oh nothing,” you might reply, “just Google telling me there is a business establishment nearby related to some of my recent search queries.”

Seriously though, my long-term mobile search dream is this: dear phone, please tell me about the history, ownership, news coverage and other information about the building I am looking at in front of me. Make that automatic and ambient and I’m going to be one happy Google Mobile Search user.


Typing a search query into Google.com is such old news. Google CEO Eric Schmidt gave a much-hyped keynote talk at Berlin‘s IFA home electronics event today and said that his vision for the future of search looks very, very different.

Schmidt says he believes that in the future, your mobile phone will quickly and automatically deliver personalized information to you based on your physical location and interests. “Since you are in location X right now, and have interest Y, Google thinks you’d like to know information Z,” the search giant will effectively say to your phone.

Here’s the key quote, as captured by web industry publication PaidContent:
shmidtpic

“Ultimately, search is not just the web but literally all of your information – your email, the things you care about, with your permission – this is personal search, for you and only for you.”The next step of search is doing this automatically. When I walk down the street, I want my smartphone to be doing searches constantly – ‘did you know?’, ‘did you know?’, ‘did you know?’, ‘did you know?’.

This notion of autonomous search – to tell me things I didn’t know but am probably interested in, is the next great stage – in my view – of search.” Leer más “Google CEO: The Next Great Stage of Search is Automatic”

Google TV Set for Fall Launch

The basic Google TV service will be free, although we anticipate that the company will also be working on deals to bring premium subscription content to the device.

In addition to Apple, Google TV faces competition from the upcoming Boxee Box, the Roku streaming players and the connected offerings that many HDTV and Blu-ray manufacturers are already building into their devices.

Sony, which will be making some of the Google TV set-top boxes as well as integrating the service into some of its new devices, has put lots of effort into making the Playstation 3 a one-stop media center for movies, games and TV shows.


Christina Warren

The Apple TV refresh isn’t the only new connected device headed to living rooms this fall; Google CEO Eric Schmidt has reaffirmed his company’s plans to release the Google TV set-top box in the U.S. later this year, with launch in the rest of the world coming in 2011.

First officially announced at Google I/O, Google TV aims to bring internet video to the living room. Users will be able to search the web and switch back and forth between web video, TV and other content all from the remote control.

Google will be selling the device as a separate set-top box and partnering with manufacturers like Sony to build the features into HDTVs and other devices. According to Reuters, Samsung is also now looking into using the service. Leer más “Google TV Set for Fall Launch”

Google CEO Schmidt: “People Aren’t Ready for the Technology Revolution”

Eric Schmidt spoke at the Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe today and dropped some serious rhetorical bombs. “There was 5 exabytes of information created between the dawn of civilization through 2003,” Schmidt said, “but that much information is now created every 2 days, and the pace is increasing…People aren’t ready for the technology revolution that’s going to happen to them.”

The Techonomy conference is a gathering of people from around the globe seeking to use technology to solve the world’s big problems. Schmidt spoke there today and said that people need to get ready for major technology disruption, fast.

The bulk of what’s contributing to this explosion of data, Schmidt says, is user generated content. From that content, far more prediction than we’ve seen today is possible and will be a factor in the future.


By Marshall Kirkpatrick <!– –>

Eric Schmidt spoke at the Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe today and dropped some serious rhetorical bombs. “There was 5 exabytes of information created between the dawn of civilization through 2003,” Schmidt said, “but that much information is now created every 2 days, and the pace is increasing…People aren’t ready for the technology revolution that’s going to happen to them.”

The Techonomy conference is a gathering of people from around the globe seeking to use technology to solve the world’s big problems. Schmidt spoke there today and said that people need to get ready for major technology disruption, fast.

The bulk of what’s contributing to this explosion of data, Schmidt says, is user generated content. From that content, far more prediction than we’ve seen today is possible and will be a factor in the future. Leer más “Google CEO Schmidt: “People Aren’t Ready for the Technology Revolution””

Schmidt anuncia el lanzamiento de Google TV y pide más datos a los internautas

La más novedosa de ellas es la que ayudará a los usuarios a traducir las llamadas que recibe en otro idioma. Otra de ellas ayudará a localizar en el mapa a través de la voz.

El CEO no ha querido hablar del rumor sobre la creación de una nueva red social por parte de Google, pero sí confirmó que están trabajando para expandirse en el negocio de la música.


Unos días después de que Steve Jobs presentara la Apple TV, ahora es Eric Schmidt, consejero delegado de Google, el que ha presentado la televisión de su compañía. Google TV verá la luz este otoño en EEUU, mientras que Europa tendrá que esperar hasta 2011.

La televisión del buscador permitirá la navegación libre por internet, y ya están en conversaciones con distintos proveedores de contenidos. También tendrán que hablar con fabricantes de televisiones, pero de momento Sony ya ha anunciado que sus nuevos dispositivos serán compatibles con Google TV, mientras que Samsung dijo que estaba pensando en incluirla.

Durante su conferencia en la IFA, Schmidt anunció otras novedades de la compañía, como las aplicaciones móviles que están desarrollando. Todas ellas están centradas en la voz. Leer más “Schmidt anuncia el lanzamiento de Google TV y pide más datos a los internautas”