Catch Me if You Can

You have a great candidate who seems ideal for the job you’re looking to fill and you start researching her online. You land on her Facebook page where you see a picture of her and your spouse or partner, which suggests that they’re more than friends. What do you do?

1. You shred the resume and delete it from your ATS
2. You make up a reason why she’s unqualified
3. You look up the classifieds in Soldier of Fortune magazine
4. You decide to interview her anyway

If you picked #4, you’d be in the minority.

In a recent survey by Microsoft 84 percent of U.S. recruiters think it is proper to consider personal data posted online when evaluating a candidate and do online research using search engines, social networking sites, photo- and video-sharing sites, personal Web sites and blogs, Twitter, online-gaming sites, and even classifieds, and auction sites like Amazon, eBay, Craigslist, etc. What they expect to find in that last category is a mystery, but I guess you never know. Now whether all this “research” does anything to improve the quality of hires, or it’s just an excuse for voyeurism, is something we’ll likely never know. The survey doesn’t address results or even ask about the respondent’s perception of results.


You have a great candidate who seems ideal for the job you’re looking to fill and you start researching her online. You land on her Facebook page where you see a picture of her and your spouse or partner, which suggests that they’re more than friends. What do you do?

  1. You shred the resume and delete it from your ATS
  2. You make up a reason why she’s unqualified
  3. You look up the classifieds in Soldier of Fortune magazine
  4. You decide to interview her anyway

If you picked #4, you’d be in the minority.

In a recent survey by Microsoft 84 percent of U.S. recruiters think it is proper to consider personal data posted online when evaluating a candidate and do online research using search engines, social networking sites, photo- and video-sharing sites, personal Web sites and blogs, Twitter, online-gaming sites, and even classifieds, and auction sites like Amazon, eBay, Craigslist, etc. What they expect to find in that last category is a mystery, but I guess you never know. Now whether all this “research” does anything to improve the quality of hires, or it’s just an excuse for voyeurism, is something we’ll likely never know. The survey doesn’t address results or even ask about the respondent’s perception of results. Leer más “Catch Me if You Can”

Network Launch is Dice Transition to Relationship Building

It’s a big day for Dice today. The IT specialty site officially opens its Dice Talent Network, while its parent company, Dice Holdings, reports its second quarter financial performance.

Analysts, reported by Yahoo Finance, expect the job board company to report earnings per share in the range of 5 to 7 cents a share, with the consensus at a nickle. Besides its flagship IT site, Dice also owns a few other boards, among them eFinancialCareers and ClearanceJobs and a company that produces job fairs.

The numbers will be the lead item on the financial conference call with analysts, but you can be certain that CEO Scott Melland is going to showcase the Talent Network release.

The network is a major step to integrating social recruiting into a job board environment. Like Facebook or LinkedIn, the Dice Talent Network program builds off a company profile that can be richly populated with external content, photos, even video. Recruiters can create their own profile page and invite potential candidates to connect with them.

It made sense for Dice to do this, Melland told me a few weeks ago, because of the nature of the visitors to the sites. (A similar service was rolled-out on ClearanceJobs.com in June.)

Most are employed, he explained. They come to the sites for the editorial content, the discussion groups, and to keep up with the kinds of jobs and companies that are hiring. Unlike a generic job board, Melland insists that a substantial number of visitors to Dice and ClearanceJobs are not actively seeking a new job, but are receptive to opportunities.

The new talent network has tools and features for them, and for employers and recruiters. Candidates or potential candidates can control access to their resume, choosing to focus only on certain companies, getting job and content updates delivered directly.


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It’s a big day for Dice today. The IT specialty site officially opens its Dice Talent Network, while its parent company, Dice Holdings, reports its second quarter financial performance.

Analysts, reported by Yahoo Finance, expect the job board company to report earnings per share in the range of 5 to 7 cents a share, with the consensus at a nickle. Besides its flagship IT site, Dice also owns a few other boards, among them eFinancialCareers and ClearanceJobs and a company that produces job fairs.

The numbers will be the lead item on the financial conference call with analysts, but you can be certain that CEO Scott Melland is going to showcase the Talent Network release.

The network is a major step to integrating social recruiting into a job board environment. Like Facebook or LinkedIn, the Dice Talent Network program  builds off a company profile that can be richly populated with external content, photos, even video. Recruiters can create their own profile page and invite potential candidates to connect with them.

It made sense for Dice to do this, Melland told me a few weeks ago, because of the nature of the visitors to the sites. (A similar service was rolled-out on ClearanceJobs.com in June.)

Most are employed, he explained. They come to the sites for the editorial content, the discussion groups, and to keep up with the kinds of jobs and companies that are hiring. Unlike a generic job board, Melland insists that a substantial number of visitors to Dice and ClearanceJobs are not actively seeking a new job, but are receptive to opportunities.

The new talent network has tools and features for them, and for employers and recruiters. Candidates or potential candidates can control access to their resume, choosing to focus only on certain companies, getting job and content updates delivered directly. Leer más “Network Launch is Dice Transition to Relationship Building”