IRIS Camera Concept Could One Day Let You Take Photos by Blinking


By KEITH WAGSTAFF | @kwagstaff | http://techland.time.com

Imagine a viewfinder that follows your eye, focuses wherever you look and then snaps a photo when you blink twice. That’s the idea behind IRIS, a new concept by Mimi Zou.

“I was thinking, ‘What’s the middle ground between the convenience of a cameraphone and the performance of a DSLR?’” says Zou, 24, who came up with IRIS as a master’s student at the Royal College of Art in London.

The camera pictured is an ideal version of what Zou hopes to build, although she has developed a slightly larger prototype that’s capable of eye-tracking and taking pictures when you blink. The biggest challenge will be moving the computing functions from her computer to the device itself.

So, what will the finished version hopefully be capable of? >>>   Leer más “IRIS Camera Concept Could One Day Let You Take Photos by Blinking”

Architects and Designers Illuminate the Future with OLEDs

OLEDs have been hailed as the Next Big Thing in lighting for years now. But beyond digital picture frames and bendy display screens that make Gumby look like a slab of concrete, we haven’t seen a whole lot from the tech that’s supposed to revolutionize the way we illuminate our world.

That’s slowly changing, and to that end, Konica Minolta has enlisted a handful of architects and designers to envision the future of OLEDs, from floating bus maps and giant public lighting “vessels” to glowstick-like jewelry that can double as safety reflectors. They’re only concepts, but they do offer a foretaste of the expanded role artificial lighting will play if and when OLEDs finally deliver on their promise.

First a primer on OLEDs: They stand for organic light-emitting diodes, and, instead of flashing light from a single-point bulb (like incandescents and even LEDs), they glow at the surface, enveloping their surroundings in a diffuse, ghostly halo. Environmentalists go gaga for them because they stay cooler than LEDs, and they’re more energy-efficient than fluorescents — plus they don’t contain mercury. And architects and designers go gaga for them because they can be bent, rolled, and otherwise manipulated into any shape imaginable.


OLEDs have been hailed as the Next Big Thing in lighting for years now. But beyond digital picture frames and bendy display screens that make Gumby look like a slab of concrete, we haven’t seen a whole lot from the tech that’s supposed to revolutionize the way we illuminate our world.

That’s slowly changing, and to that end, Konica Minolta has enlisted a handful of architects and designers to envision the future of OLEDs, from floating bus maps and giant public lighting “vessels” to glowstick-like jewelry that can double as safety reflectors. They’re only concepts, but they do offer a foretaste of the expanded role artificial lighting will play if and when OLEDs finally deliver on their promise.

First a primer on OLEDs: They stand for organic light-emitting diodes, and, instead of flashing light from a single-point bulb (like incandescents and even LEDs), they glow at the surface, enveloping their surroundings in a diffuse, ghostly halo. Environmentalists go gaga for them because they stay cooler than LEDs, and they’re more energy-efficient than fluorescents — plus they don’t contain mercury. And architects and designers go gaga for them because they can be bent, rolled, and otherwise manipulated into any shape imaginable. Leer más “Architects and Designers Illuminate the Future with OLEDs”