Ok, you’re a marketer, still trying to determine if Pinterest is right for you…


…and you heard a boogey man story about copyright problems. You’re asking,
Via http://marketingonpinterest.com

English: Red Pinterest logo
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Is Using Pinterest Going To Get Me In Trouble?”

(Although I’m not a lawyer, and this should not be considered legal advice…)

Let’s review the facts, and then you can decide…

Let’s say we did violate someone’s copyright. What happens next? The copyright holder has 3 choices, according to a great Electronic Frontier Foundation article on this issue. The copyright owner can:

  1. Let is slide.
  2. Sue you.
  3. Submit a DMCA Take Down Notice.

We think Youtube is a good case study for this issue, so it’s helpful to know what the common practice has been there when copyrights appear to be violated. As a general rule, again, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation Article, a DMCA Take Down Notice is the most common response because it is 1) Fast and 2) Inexpensive.

So, could you be sued if you make a mistake? Yes. Does that happen in real life? The Electronic Frontier People said they don’t know of ANY cases except a couple rare one’s involving leaked movie trailers.

[If the Copyright owner is getting massive referral traffic & brand exposure via Pinterest would they even want to file one of these notices? No. But still, they could. Let’s think worst case.] Leer más “Ok, you’re a marketer, still trying to determine if Pinterest is right for you…”

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Craigslist Pulls ‘Censored’ Label From Sex Ads Area

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Is Craigslist’s adult services section gone for good?

The classifieds site, which shut down the sex ads section last weekend and replaced the link with a “censored” bar, has now removed that label. The sex ads section is still gone. Craigslist has refused to discuss the move and on Thursday, Susan MacTavish Best, its spokeswoman, would not say anything beyond confirming that the ads were still blocked.

Analysts had speculated that Craigslist used the word “censored” to make a statement. Though Craigslist is not legally responsible for what people post on its site, state attorneys general and advocacy groups have been pressuring the company to shut down the adult services section. But analysts also said that the outpouring of attention that Craigslist’s sex ads have received in recent days would make it very difficult for the site to bring back the ads.


Image representing Craigslist as depicted in C...

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Is Craigslist’s adult services section gone for good?

The classifieds site, which shut down the sex ads section last weekend and replaced the link with a “censored” bar, has now removed that label. The sex ads section is still gone. Craigslist has refused to discuss the move and on Thursday, Susan MacTavish Best, its spokeswoman, would not say anything beyond confirming that the ads were still blocked.

Analysts had speculated that Craigslist used the word “censored” to make a statement. Though Craigslist is not legally responsible for what people post on its site, state attorneys general and advocacy groups have been pressuring the company to shut down the adult services section. But analysts also said that the outpouring of attention that Craigslist’s sex ads have received in recent days would make it very difficult for the site to bring back the ads. Leer más “Craigslist Pulls ‘Censored’ Label From Sex Ads Area”

Web Impostors May Face Prison in California

Internet users pretending to be others could be prosecuted—and sued—if Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signs an “e-personation” bill

By Olga Kharif

California Web impostors beware: You may soon be breaking the law, even if you aren’t one of the perpetrators targeted by the state’s “e-personation” bill.

The measure, which is awaiting Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature, carries fines of as much as $1,000 and a year in jail for anyone who poses as another person online with malicious intent. The law, which would take effect on Jan. 1, would also allow victims to file civil suits.

People other than criminals may be affected by the legislation, Bloomberg Businessweek.com reported today. Pranksters, writers of satire, and even activists living outside the state could be subject to legal action, some lawyers say. Fake accounts in the names of celebrities and politicians abound on microblogging site Twitter and social network Facebook.


Internet users pretending to be others could be prosecuted—and sued—if Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signs an “e-personation” bill

By Olga Kharif

California Web impostors beware: You may soon be breaking the law, even if you aren’t one of the perpetrators targeted by the state’s “e-personation” bill.

The measure, which is awaiting Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature, carries fines of as much as $1,000 and a year in jail for anyone who poses as another person online with malicious intent. The law, which would take effect on Jan. 1, would also allow victims to file civil suits.

People other than criminals may be affected by the legislation, Bloomberg Businessweek.com reported today. Pranksters, writers of satire, and even activists living outside the state could be subject to legal action, some lawyers say. Fake accounts in the names of celebrities and politicians abound on microblogging site Twitter and social network Facebook.

“The law is very vague,” Aaron Simpson, a privacy lawyer and partner at firm Hunton & Williams in New York, said in an interview. “Legitimate forms of speech could be caught within its grasp. This is going to be tough for the courts to process.”

The law applies to anyone who credibly impersonates “for purposes of harming, intimidating, threatening, or defrauding another person,” according to the language of the bill, whose author is state Senator Joe Simitian, a Democrat whose district includes parts of Silicon Valley. Leer más “Web Impostors May Face Prison in California”

How US Government Spies Use Facebook


The US Department of Justice this week released slides from a presentation deck titled Obtaining and Using Evidence from Social Networking Sites. The document was released in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

The DoJ presentation describes Facebook as much more co-operative with law enforcement requests for user information than Twitter and MySpace are. It also explains to officers what the advantages of going undercover on social networking sites are. The EFF posted IRS training documents for using various internet tools as well, including Google Street View, but those were much tamer than the Justice file.