13 Beautiful Online Stores Created With Wix


Image representing Wix as depicted in CrunchBase
Image via CrunchBase

eCommerce websites are changing the way people shop. Shopping on online stores has many advantages: You get to save time and effort; you can easily compare different brands and vendors; not to mention that in many cases it will save you some money as well. But what started as a practical innovation is now becoming a huge market with intense competition.

Online stores are no longer considered attractive only for offering a more comfortable alternative to the shopping mall. They need to really grab clients’ attention with an outstanding design and a quality shopping experience.

In the past few months, we implemented many improvements and new features to our eCommerce platform, including the amazing Shopify app. Wix users now have more options than ever to create a stunning online store that really sells.

Want to see it with your own eyes? Have a look at these amazing eCommerce websites, all built by Wix users using the HTML5 website builder. Get inspired by these awesome online stores and then check out our eCommerce templates to get your own store running!

Online Store

Tuktu Paper Co.

Online Stores

The Kama Photography

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5 Great Social Networks Every Designer Should Know About


The emergence of niche-based social networks creates exciting new meeting points for people of similar interests and professionals. Designers are lucky enough to have a variety of social networks tailor-made especially for them. The web is full of opportunities for designers to connect, converse and increase the overall creativity-share. Check out the following list of awesome social talent hubs, where designers can explore, get inspired and share their feedback.

Dribbble

Social Networks Every Graphic Designer Should Know About

Once coined the “Twitter of designers”,  Dribbble is like show and tell for designers, developers and other creatives. Dribbble is a phenomenal hub of activity and inspiration. It hosts a growing group of talented and creative minds. Members on Dribbble share sneak peeks of their work in the form of “shots”- small screenshots of the designs they are currently working on. Other members then comment and give feedback on the work presented. You can sign up either as a prospect – a designer who would like to be invited to share work, or as a scout – if you are seeking designers for a project.

Threadless

Social Networks Every Graphic Designer Should Know About

Threadless is a social eCommerce network for artists. The designs posted on Threadless are created by a community of skilled designers. Each week, different shirt or product designs are submitted online and put to a vote. The site staff reviews the top-scoring designs and selects the winners, which are then printed on clothing and other related products. The items are later sold through an online store and at the retail store in Chicago. Printed artwork at Threadless ranges from beautiful and elegant to humorous and whimsical. Amazing creativity and talent are never short. Leer más “5 Great Social Networks Every Designer Should Know About”

Add the Shopify App to your Website & Supercharge your Sales!


When you create an online shop to start selling online, you want your store to be perfect. It needs to display your products in the most beautiful way, to be simple, user-friendly, maintain a high sales and retention rate. Shopify delivers all these, big time.
The new Shopify app means fantastic news for online store owners: you can now enjoy the integration between Wix’ stunning layouts and Shopify’s most advanced eCommerce platform.

Let’s see just how good this gets:

Ease of Use

With a simple click, you can add the Shopify app to your Wix HTML5 website. Customizing and editing is an intuitive and easy process. Just add your products with images, titles and descriptions and you’re good to go.

What the Shopify App Can Do for your Website

Great Product Display Leer más “Add the Shopify App to your Website & Supercharge your Sales!”

How to Set Up an Online Shop the Easy Way


How to Set Up an Online Shop the Easy Way

Building an eCommerce website may sound like a difficult task, but it can actually be quite simple and intuitive. If you have the right tools, you can have your online shop up and running in no time! And Wix has all the tools you need for the job.

Here’s a simple guide on how to create an eCommerce website, the easy way.

Step #1: Research

Before you launch your online shop, make sure you look around on the net and see what kind of competition you’re dealing with. What are similar stores doing right and what are they doing wrong? It will help you understand how your business can stand out, what are your competitors’ weak spots and what are their advantages.

Woman holding binoculars

Step #2: Choosing a Template

Wix has many eCommerce templates for you to choose from – both in HTML5 or Flash. When you look for the perfect template for your website, consider these points:

  • Style: Are you looking for a vintage look? A minimalist design to match your products? A professional cut maybe? Choose the template that has the closest style to what you have in mind.
  • Colors: If your brand already has distinct colors, go with a template that matches or compliments these colors.
  • Layout: Which template can display your products in the most appealing way? Would you like the homepage to be the store itself? Do you need a layout that has space for deals and discounts? How do you want the navigation menu to look like? Different templates have different layouts and you can choose the best one for you!
Wix eCommerce website Template

Step #3: Editing & Customizing

The best part about working with a Wix eCommerce template is that it is so easy to customize. Simply click on all elements in the Wix editor to edit them. You can change the texts, background image, fonts, contact information and more.

Of course, the most important part is customizing the store itself. As store manager you can:

  • Add several images for each product
  • Set displayed currency and weight units
  • Add a choice of colors and sizes
  • Write a full product description (overview and details)
  • Manage inventory and available stock
  • Add ribbons and badges for special announcements (sale, new, out of stock)
  • Split your products into different categories
  • And plenty more!
Product Options HTML5 Wix Website builder

Step #3: Using the Right Images Leer más “How to Set Up an Online Shop the Easy Way”

55+ Google Analytics Custom Alerts – The Check Engine Light For Your Data


Last month, Phil wrote a blog about five features of Google Analytics that you probably are not using, but there obviously are more than five, and here’s another one that you probably aren’t using, but you should. In fact, I think this is probably one of the KEY things you should do when setting up an account and a new website, and it’s my bet that the vast majority of people don’t do it at all.

Custom Alerts

Why use Custom Alerts? Because you don’t check your analytics every day. OK well some of you data geeks that read this blog do, and I do, but most people who are just regular people, they don’t. That guy who is wearing 20 hats, he doesn’t have time to go over his data every morning for an hour or two. You could argue he should, but maybe he doesn’t. Custom Alerts can let him know, in general,

if there is something that needs his or her attention. Is something significant, or at least possibly significant happening? Should someone take a look? it’s like a check oil or check engine light on your car. If the light doesn’t come on you probably (I hope) change the oil on your car regularly, but if something is going wrong with your oil, then you sure are glad that light is coming on to let you know to check it. Leer más “55+ Google Analytics Custom Alerts – The Check Engine Light For Your Data”

Herramientas para añadir tiendas virtuales a tu página de Facebook


 

Si quieres vender algo por Facebook, y no sabes muy bien como hacerlo, aquí teneis unas cuantas herramientas que os facilitarán la tarea.

Payvment E-commerce Storefront

Es quizás la aplicación de comercio electrónico más sencilla de utilizar. Dispone de gran variedad de opciones para montar una tienda online a medida de la compañía o el producto. Incluye un área de administración propia para gestionar productos y ventas. Por el momento sólo acepta pago vía paypal y Payvment.

Vendor – Free e-commerce Shopping Cart

Permite montar un carro de la compra en la página Facebook de modo que se puedan ir agregando productos y precios a través de la “store”. Esto permite que lo puedan ver los seguidores de la página pudiendo vender y cobrar usando PayPal.

InfusedCommerce Leer más “Herramientas para añadir tiendas virtuales a tu página de Facebook”

Getting Started With E-Commerce: Your Options When Selling Online

The world of online sales, whether of products or services, can be daunting at first; the options seem confusing and the information conflicted. Yet as the designer or developer of an online store, you will need to guide your client through the maze of choices in order to get it up and running.

I have developed many e-commerce websites during my career as a Web developer. I’ve used and modified off-the-shelf software and have also developed custom solutions — so I know from experience that there are a number of important questions to answer before presenting possible solutions to a client. Getting all the pertinent information up front is vital if such a project is to run smoothly, and it can save you from delays during the process. It can also help you advise the client on whether they need a full custom cart or an open-source or off-the-shelf product.

This article responds to some questions you should be asking of your client before putting together a proposal for the development of an e-commerce website. I’ll explain the most important things to think about in terms of taking payments and credit card security. It should give you enough information to be able to guide your client and to look up more detailed information about the aspects that apply to your particular situation.


The world of online sales, whether of products or services, can be daunting at first; the options seem confusing and the information conflicted. Yet as the designer or developer of an online store, you will need to guide your client through the maze of choices in order to get it up and running.

I have developed many e-commerce websites during my career as a Web developer. I’ve used and modified off-the-shelf software and have also developed custom solutions — so I know from experience that there are a number of important questions to answer before presenting possible solutions to a client. Getting all the pertinent information up front is vital if such a project is to run smoothly, and it can save you from delays during the process. It can also help you advise the client on whether they need a full custom cart or an open-source or off-the-shelf product.

This article responds to some questions you should be asking of your client before putting together a proposal for the development of an e-commerce website. I’ll explain the most important things to think about in terms of taking payments and credit card security. It should give you enough information to be able to guide your client and to look up more detailed information about the aspects that apply to your particular situation.

What this article doesn’t cover is the design and user experience side of creating an e-commerce website, because gathering this information would normally occur alongside the designing and branding of the website.

What You Need To Know

It is really tempting to select a solution based on something you have used before or perhaps after asking around to see what others recommend. But you can get stuck in a rut this way. Every online business has different needs, so one solution is unlikely to fit all. Before writing any code or trying an off-the-shelf package, you need to ask yourself or your client a few questions:

  • What are you selling?
  • What shopping functionality should you offer?
  • How will you take payment?
  • How will items be delivered?
  • What reporting and other functionalities are required?

What Are You Selling?

Your online store may be selling physical products that are shipped by the postal service or a courier to the customer after a completed purchase. Or it might be selling products that are delivered electronically, such as e-book downloads, MP3 music or software. Donations and subscriptions are types of transactions to consider as well.

What Shopping Functionality Should You Offer?

Will you be selling a single item, (such as an e-book) or will visitors need to be able to browse and add multiple items to their cart? Are these items associated with distinct options? If you’re selling t-shirts, for example, size and color might be options to include. Are categories needed to make ordering easier? Will a given item be listed in only one category, or could it be found in several? Would the ability to tag items be useful, or the ability to link them to related items (thus allowing the store owner to promote accessories for items that the customer has added to their cart)?

Sm-ecommerce-hicksmade-crop in Getting Started With E-Commerce: Your Options When Selling Online
Items on the Hicksmade website can be displayed in categories. (Large view)

Will there be special offers on the website? Standards ones are “Buy one, get one free,” “20% discount,” “two for one” and “buy item x and get item y at half price.” Setting up these kinds of offers can be quite complex if you are developing a custom system; and if you’re buying an off-the-shelf solution for the store, then you’ll need to know whether it supports them.

The devil (and the budget) is in the details. If your client is expecting particular functionality, find out about it now.

Accounts and Tracking Orders

Part of the user experience could include managing an account and tracking orders. Must users create accounts, or is it optional? Can they track their order and watch it move from “processing” to “shipped”? Account functionality must include basic management functions, such as the ability to reset a forgotten password and to update contact details.

How Will You Take Payment?

You’ll likely need to accept credit and debit card payments from customers. There are a number of options that range in complexity and expense.

PayPal

PayPal is a straightforward way to take payments online. The advantages are that creating a PayPal account is easy, it doesn’t require a credit check, and integration can be as simple as hardcoding a button on your page or as involved as full integration. Google Checkout offers a similar service (and a similarly low barrier to entry), as does Amazon (in the US) through Amazon Payments.

Using A Merchant Account

To accept card payments directly, rather than through services like PayPal, you will need an Internet Merchant Account. This enables you to take credit card payments and process the money to your bank account. If you have an existing merchant account for face-to-face or telephone sales, though, you will not be able to use it for online transactions. Internet transactions are riskier. So, to start trading online, you’ll need to contact your bank. The bank will require that you take payments securely, in most circumstances via a payment service provider (or PSP, sometimes called a payment gateway).

What you should definitely not do is store card details in order to enter them in an offline PDQ later. This would be against the terms of the merchant agreement. So, unless you have written permission from your bank saying you are allowed to do this, and you’re complying with the PCI DSS, just don’t.

The Payment Gateway

The purpose of the payment gateway is to take the card payment of your customer, validate the card number and amount and then pass the payment to your bank securely. You can interact with a payment gateway in two ways:

  • Via a pay page
    The user moves from your website to a secure page on the payment gateway server to enter their details.
  • Via API integration
    The user enters their card details on your website (on a page with a secure certificate installed, running SSL), and those details are then passed to the gateway. Your website acts as the intermediary; the user is not aware of the bank transaction happening, having seen it only via your website.

The advantage of pay page integration is that your website never touches the card details, so you are not liable for the customer’s security. The most significant disadvantage is that you lose some control over the payment process, because the final step requires gathering all the details to pass to the payment server. In addition, you are often unable to customize the payment screen, even if only to upload a logo.

Store owners are often concerned about this break in the user experience: they fear the user will bail before going to the payment page on WorldPay or another server. But transferring your user to a known banking website where they’ll enter their card details might actually give them confidence in the legitimacy of your website. When I deal with an unknown website (perhaps a small retailer) and it asks me to enter my card details, I immediately worry about how it will handle them. Does the website email my card details in clear text? Will the details be stored in a database somewhere by the website? Even if the page has a secure certificate and checks out, I still have no idea what happens to my details after I hit “Submit” on the form. If the final step of checking out takes me to a known PSP page, then I can be confident that my details are safe and the small website isn’t handling them at all. I trust WorldPay with my details far more than I trust Joe Blogg’s Widget Store.

Another useful argument for using a pay page is that, should there be any changes in card payment regulations, these will be handled by the PSP. For example, 3-D Secure (verified by Visa or MasterCard SecureCode) was instituted recently. It requires that users verify their payment on a page related to their bank before it can be authorized. If you had API integration, you would need to edit your code to ready it for 3-D Secure; whereas on payment page websites, those changes are done by the PSP.

These points have encouraged many website owners to reconsider their reluctance to use a pay page — most realize that being responsible for credit card details is more trouble than it’s worth.

Pay page integration should work with most off-the-shelf software. After payment is made, it typically sends back something that enables your website — which has a script running for this — to identify the user and the transaction and perform any post-purchase processing that may be needed (such as marking an order as “Paid” in the database or giving access to an electronic download).

The advantage of full API integration is that you control the payment process from beginning to end, including the look and feel of the payment pages. However, you are also responsible for the security of the user’s card details, and regulations require that you prove you are following best practices. Leer más “Getting Started With E-Commerce: Your Options When Selling Online”