Falso Me Gusta | pedir UN ME GUSTA en FACEBOOK, la gente hace lo contrario…(yo no creo, propuesta de juego)

Un reconocido SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER, que desea permanecer anónimo, sostiene que cuanto más le pedís a la gente UN ME GUSTA en FACEBOOK, hace lo contrario.

Te prendés a jugar a esto, le vuelo un paradigma al demonio y hacemos algo piola con el resultado entrá acá http://t.co/gwP9DhHl y donamos $200 asumiendo q todos ganan más las 20 licencias para ONG o entidades médicas que las necesiten y no puedan garparlas!! VAMOSSS

Mi posición es la opuesta. APOSTAMOS $100 cada uno, ($200) los DONAMOS A UN ENTE QUE ELIJAN UDS Y DUPLICO MI APUESTA A 20 LICENCIAS SIN COSTO A MEDICOS PARTICULARES O DE ZONAS CARENCIADAS. YO LES PIDO EL ME GUSTA. EL SOSTIENE QUE NO LO VAN A HACER. LAS CARTAS ESTAN SOBRE LA MESA.

La causa y la comunicación, hacen VERDADEROS ME GUSTAN


Un reconocido SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER, que desea permanecer anónimo, sostiene que cuanto más le pedís a la gente UN ME GUSTA en FACEBOOK, hace lo contrario.

Te prendés a jugar a esto, le vuelo un paradigma al demonio y hacemos algo piola con el resultado entrá acá
http://t.co/gwP9DhHl y donamos $200 asumiendo q todos ganan más las 20 licencias para ONG o entidades médicas que las necesiten y no puedan garparlas!! VAMOSSS…

EL de la foto soy yo bailando BUM BUM MARACAS!! luego vamos por las clases de baile >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Mi posición es la opuesta. APOSTAMOS $100 cada uno, ($200) los DONAMOS A UN ENTE QUE ELIJAN UDS Y DUPLICO MI APUESTA A 20 LICENCIAS SIN COSTO A MEDICOS PARTICULARES O DE ZONAS CARENCIADAS. YO LES PIDO EL ME GUSTA. EL SOSTIENE QUE NO LO VAN A HACER. LAS CARTAS ESTAN SOBRE LA MESA.

La causa y la comunicación, hacen VERDADEROS ME GUSTAN

Nissan Leaf Falls on the Side of ‘Innovation’

Earlier this year, when Toyota was facing its PR disaster over recalls of faulty anti-lock brakes and accelerator pedals, Rob Schwartz said Nissan looked at the situation and asked, “Why do we have to be No. 3?”

Nissan, which Schwartz dubbed an “alternative” Japanese brand that formerly stood for performance and design, is attempting to change that with a big boost in ad spending and a new campaign built around the theme, “Innovation for all.”

Schwartz, chief creative officer at TBWA\Chiat\Day, said the Toyota episode “opened our minds” to the fact that an opportunity existed. The strategy, outlined in the agency’s new campaign, is to own “innovation” in the auto category by using Leaf, the brand’s electric car, as a halo.

The “Innovation for all campaign” soft launched in July with a TV spot featuring Lance Armstrong bemoaning all the tailpipes he’s followed over the past 20 years of biking. Then Armstrong lauds the Leaf, which he notes is “100 percent electric, no tailpipe.”

Nissan is breaking five more spots echoing the theme, including one called “Innovations” that celebrates new technologies the brand is introducing, like smart phone apps and the use of recycled materials in the cars. On Sept. 9, the brand plans to introduce “Polar Bear,” which takes on global warming by showing the threatened species hugging a consumer who bought the Leaf.

Jon Brancheau, vp, marketing at Nissan North America, said the Leaf is meant to be the “poster child of innovation” for the brand. Brancheau acknowledged that the model, which goes on sale in December at $32,780 (not including a $7,500 federal tax credit), is not for everyone. He said communication at the dealer level will stress that the model only gets about 100 miles per charge, so it wouldn’t be ideal for long trips.


– Todd Wasserman
Earlier this year, when Toyota was facing its PR disaster over recalls of faulty anti-lock brakes and accelerator pedals, Rob Schwartz said Nissan looked at the situation and asked, “Why do we have to be No. 3?”

Nissan, which Schwartz dubbed an “alternative” Japanese brand that formerly stood for performance and design, is attempting to change that with a big boost in ad spending and a new campaign built around the theme, “Innovation for all.”

Schwartz, chief creative officer at TBWA\Chiat\Day, said the Toyota episode “opened our minds” to the fact that an opportunity existed. The strategy, outlined in the agency’s new campaign, is to own “innovation” in the auto category by using Leaf, the brand’s electric car, as a halo.

The “Innovation for all campaign” soft launched in July with a TV spot featuring Lance Armstrong bemoaning all the tailpipes he’s followed over the past 20 years of biking. Then Armstrong lauds the Leaf, which he notes is “100 percent electric, no tailpipe.”

Nissan is breaking five more spots echoing the theme, including one called “Innovations” that celebrates new technologies the brand is introducing, like smart phone apps and the use of recycled materials in the cars. On Sept. 9, the brand plans to introduce “Polar Bear,” which takes on global warming by showing the threatened species hugging a consumer who bought the Leaf.

Jon Brancheau, vp, marketing at Nissan North America, said the Leaf is meant to be the “poster child of innovation” for the brand. Brancheau acknowledged that the model, which goes on sale in December at $32,780 (not including a $7,500 federal tax credit), is not for everyone. He said communication at the dealer level will stress that the model only gets about 100 miles per charge, so it wouldn’t be ideal for long trips. Leer más “Nissan Leaf Falls on the Side of ‘Innovation’”

Springwise | New business ideas from around the world


We’ve seen a couple of different initiatives to provide drivers of electric vehicles with free power for their cars—both at a McDonald’s and at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport—but as such vehicles become more widespread, efforts like that are unlikely to remain sustainable. Recognizing the need for a formal charging infrastructure, SemaConnect has developed an automated solution that lets parking operators build, scale and manage a network of vehicle-charging systems.

SemaConnect offers a range of both pedestal-mounted and wall-mounted charging stations that enable electric cars and plug-in hybrids to connect effortlessly to a power source. Smart card authentication gives only authorized users access to charging, while cellular connectivity transmits transaction information to a remote server. The SemaCharge Network Management System, meanwhile, is a web-based system that allows infrastructure operators such as municipalities, utilities, commercial parking lot operators and apartment building managers to monitor and manage their network of charging stations, including metering, billing and demand response. The SemaCharge network also gives consumers the ability to track their usage and pay online.

As company founder Mahi Reddy recently told the Washington Post, “the notion that your landlord would install a socket so that you could get free juice is a fantasy. This is not like charging a cellphone.” Maryland-based SemaConnect recently installed one of its first devices at the Loews Annapolis Hotel, the Post reports. Parking-lot operators around the globe: one to get in on early…? (Related: Parking operator launches car-sharing service.)

Website: www.semaconnect.com
Contact: en quiries@semaconnect.com

Spotted by: Susanna Haynie

We’ve seen numerous social networks for travellers in recent years, including KLM’s location-specific Club China and Club Africa for connecting people who do business in those parts of the world. Taking a slightly different tack is British Airways’ Metrotwin, which focuses on comparing and contrasting city “twins” instead.

New York and London are the cities paired on the main Metrotwin site, which provides recommendations for the best neighbourhoods, businesses, attractions and places to visit on both sides of the pond. Rather than connecting travellers, it strives to be more of a social utility for time-starved, novelty-seeking urbanites living in or travelling between the two cities. Same goes for Metrotwin Mumbai, a like-minded arm of the effort that pairs London and Mumbai instead. The site explains: “Do you know where to find the Breach Candy of London? What about the Tate Modern of Mumbai? Metrotwin makes these cross-references useful by asking people like you to suggest Mumbai and London ‘twins’ for neighbourhoods, businesses, attractions, places and people.” Rather than reviewing any and every cafe in those cities, then, it focuses on comparable “best of” destinations, drawing from local online communities and bloggers—who, incidentally, get rewarded for their content with British Airways miles.

Now in beta, Metrotwin puts an interesting spin on travel review sites by focusing on equivalent attractions in very different cities. That’s how people often learn about new things, after all—by comparing them with what they already know—so the approach makes intuitive sense. One to emulate for travellers in your part of the world, or to apply to a different product category?

Website: www.mumbai.metrotwin.com
Contact: support@metrotwin.com

Spotted by: Louisa Redshaw

Image credits: Deepa and obo-bobolina

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